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Hannibal Rising: A Novel

by

Hannibal Rising: A Novel Cover

ISBN13: 9780385339414
ISBN10: 0385339410
Condition: Standard
Dustjacket: Standard
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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

He is one of the most haunting characters in all of literature.

At last the evolution of his evil is revealed...

Hannibal Lecter emerges from the nightmare of the Eastern Front, a boy in the snow, mute, with a chain around his neck.

He seems utterly alone, but he has brought his demons with him.

Hannibal's uncle, a noted painter, finds him in a Soviet orphanage and brings him to France, where Hannibal will live with his uncle and his uncle's beautiful and exotic wife, Lady Murasaki.

Lady Murasaki helps Hannibal to heal. With her help he flourishes, becoming the youngest person ever admitted to medical school in France.

But Hannibal's demons visit him and torment him. When he is old enough, he visits them in turn.

He discovers he has gifts beyond the academic, and in that epiphany, Hannibal Lecter becomes death's prodigy.

Review:

"When last seen in the novels of Thomas Harris, Dr. Hannibal Lecter — clinical psychiatrist, criminal mastermind and grisly gourmand — was dancing with former FBI agent Clarice Starling on a terrace in Buenos Aires. The discomforting finale of 'Hannibal' (1999), which suggested that Clarice had succumbed to Lecter's chemicals, if not his charm, was rejected in the movie version in favor of a more... Washington Post Book Review (read the entire Washington Post review)

Review:

"Hannibal Rising [is Harris's] final (please!) effort to cash in on a once-fine franchise that fell from grace....The reader who begins with this new book will have no idea why any of [Harris's] older ones are well regarded." Janet Maslin, The New York Times

Review:

"[W]hile it is not Harris's best book — that would still be Red Dragon — it comes in second....I read Hannibal Rising in one day, and I was entertained throughout. But when I put it down, I wasn't longing for more. What I wanted instead was to see what other kinds of stories this gifted storyteller has to tell." Newsweek

Review:

"[Harris] is ruining one of the great villain franchises of all time....Tom, that very profitable Hannibal franchise is played out. Come home." USA Today

Review:

"Harris' handling of the wartime violence is...impressive, as swift and vicious as the blitzkrieg itself....The Hannibal of this novel isn't the monstrously evil being who enthralled us in The Silence of the Lambs." Los Angeles Times

Review:

"Hannibal Rising is a book of gore, and while it means to explain how Hannibal's obsession with Clarice is rooted in the trauma of Mischa's death, there's just too much blood on the pages to see anything all that clearly." New York Daily News

Review:

"The violence, though stunning, is so poorly described it doesn't frighten....Harris should have stifled Lecter after Silence. Hannibal gave me indigestion, and Hannibal Rising didn't leave me hungry for more either. (Grade: D)" Entertainment Weekly

Review:

"Harris has fashioned a banal if violent revenge saga that owes more than a little to Jerzy Kosinski's The Speckled Bird....Harris has pretty well worn out the killer/epicurean dichotomy." Philadelphia Inquirer

Review:

"Hannibal Rising would have been truly interesting, and more disturbing, if Mr. Harris had presented us with a moment when Hannibal could have turned back — or even thought about stepping away from violence. But he doesn't." Dallas Morning News

Review:

"While Harris has explained, in gripping detail, Hannibal Lecter's mysterious origins, perhaps Lecter is a more frightening character in Silence of the Lambs, where his childhood traumas, his dark closet of memories remained tightly shut." Boston Globe

About the Author

Thomas Harris began his writing career covering crime in the United States and Mexico, and was a reporter and editor for the Associated Press in New York City. His first novel, Black Sunday, was published in 1975, followed by Red Dragon in 1981, The Silence of the Lambs in 1988, and Hannibal in 1999.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

Booklover46, January 14, 2007 (view all comments by Booklover46)
I do see why people did not find this book as good as the "Red Dragon" and "Silence of the Lambs", however I found the links between Hannibal's past and future interesting.

It is very easy to miss some of the fine points in this book, much as I did on my first reading of "Hannibal" that caused me to go back and read it a second time. I just had to figure out what, Harris, was getting at and on second reading things fell into place.

Here we see Hannibal as an extremely brilliant child with a deep attachment to both his family and those who were part of their household. What I registered most was his love for family and after their death, having only his sister, his utter devotion to her. His depth of feeling, his devotion, compassion and empathy do not signal the signes of a sociopath that so often show in the childhood of such people. No, Hannibal did not start out as a sociopath, he was a child with deep attachments, deep emotions and considerable courage. A child willing to die in place of his sister does not fit the profile of a sociopath; yet that is the label placed upon him throughout these books.

When he sets out to kill those murderous cannibals who ate children, ate his sister, and operated throughout as pure sociopath's with no conscience, it enlightens what he becomes. My next realization was when one of those responsible tells him that he too ate his sister to survive, he is torn apart, and his mind simply breaks along with his heart. Hearing that man tell him that the broth they fed him was made from his sister's body would be enough to drive an adult into madness.

When we see him as an adult other things begin to make sense. His time watching those people moving through the showing of torture instruments at the exhibition in ?Hannibal? puzzled me at first reading. Puzzled me until I realized he was watching the watchers, his interest had nothing to do with the exhibit and everything to do with people who could see these things, be excited by them and walk out sexually stimulated.

From Hannibal Rising I understand better than ever his fixation on the aspects of human behavior that he detests. His gentler attitude toward women becomes clearer when one realizes how important his stepmother was in those formative years.

Perhaps one needs to want to understand how he became what he became. Maybe, I find myself wondering if all that genius used for good in many cases, could be as easily used for evil. I cannot help but wonder if there will be a sequel where we discover if, as he realizes his desire to alter the past and bring his sister back to life, can be let go of. If he can let go of that, then were will his genius take him, where will it take Clarisse on this strange journey.

There is no doubting that true madness makes up an element of Hannibal however covered by the mask of sanity. If the insanity leaves, what then remains, what could possibly take place inside this man? These books take more close attention than most fiction or you pass right over the important things dragged along by the more obvious and bloody ones.
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Product Details

ISBN:
9780385339414
Author:
Harris, Thomas
Publisher:
Delacorte Press
Subject:
Thrillers
Subject:
Psychological
Subject:
Suspense
Subject:
Serial murderers
Subject:
Lecter, Hannibal (Fictitious character)
Subject:
Psychological fiction
Subject:
Suspense fiction
Copyright:
Series:
Hannibal Lecter Novels
Series Volume:
04
Publication Date:
December 5, 2006
Binding:
Hardback
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
336
Dimensions:
9.3 x 6.3 x 1.4 in 1.45 lb

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Related Subjects

Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z
Fiction and Poetry » Mystery » A to Z
Fiction and Poetry » Mystery » Sale Books
Fiction and Poetry » Popular Fiction » Contemporary Thrillers

Hannibal Rising: A Novel Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$7.95 In Stock
Product details 336 pages Delacorte Press - English 9780385339414 Reviews:
"Review" by , "Hannibal Rising [is Harris's] final (please!) effort to cash in on a once-fine franchise that fell from grace....The reader who begins with this new book will have no idea why any of [Harris's] older ones are well regarded."
"Review" by , "[W]hile it is not Harris's best book — that would still be Red Dragon — it comes in second....I read Hannibal Rising in one day, and I was entertained throughout. But when I put it down, I wasn't longing for more. What I wanted instead was to see what other kinds of stories this gifted storyteller has to tell."
"Review" by , "[Harris] is ruining one of the great villain franchises of all time....Tom, that very profitable Hannibal franchise is played out. Come home."
"Review" by , "Harris' handling of the wartime violence is...impressive, as swift and vicious as the blitzkrieg itself....The Hannibal of this novel isn't the monstrously evil being who enthralled us in The Silence of the Lambs."
"Review" by , "Hannibal Rising is a book of gore, and while it means to explain how Hannibal's obsession with Clarice is rooted in the trauma of Mischa's death, there's just too much blood on the pages to see anything all that clearly."
"Review" by , "The violence, though stunning, is so poorly described it doesn't frighten....Harris should have stifled Lecter after Silence. Hannibal gave me indigestion, and Hannibal Rising didn't leave me hungry for more either. (Grade: D)"
"Review" by , "Harris has fashioned a banal if violent revenge saga that owes more than a little to Jerzy Kosinski's The Speckled Bird....Harris has pretty well worn out the killer/epicurean dichotomy."
"Review" by , "Hannibal Rising would have been truly interesting, and more disturbing, if Mr. Harris had presented us with a moment when Hannibal could have turned back — or even thought about stepping away from violence. But he doesn't."
"Review" by , "While Harris has explained, in gripping detail, Hannibal Lecter's mysterious origins, perhaps Lecter is a more frightening character in Silence of the Lambs, where his childhood traumas, his dark closet of memories remained tightly shut."
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