We Need Diverse Ya Sale
 
 

Special Offers see all

Enter to WIN a $100 Credit

Subscribe to PowellsBooks.news
for a chance to win.
Privacy Policy

Visit our stores


    Recently Viewed clear list


    Lists | June 22, 2015

    Stephen Jarvis: IMG Robert Seymour — 13 Pictures



    1. Self-Portrait. My new novel, Death and Mr. Pickwick, tells the story of the origins of Charles Dickens's first novel, The Pickwick Papers. Its... Continue »
    1. $21.00 Sale Hardcover add to wish list

      Death and Mr. Pickwick

      Stephen Jarvis 9780374139667

    spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$6.95
List price: $29.95
Used Hardcover
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
Qty Store Section
1 Burnside Literature- A to Z

South of Broad

by

South of Broad Cover

ISBN13: 9780385413053
ISBN10: 038541305x
Condition: Standard
Dustjacket: Standard
All Product Details

Only 1 left in stock at $6.95!

 

 

Reading Group Guide

1. At the beginning of the novel, Leo is called on to mitigate the racial prejudice of the football team. What other types of prejudice appear in the novel? Which characters are guilty of relying on preconceived notions? Why do you think Leo is so accepting of most people? Why is his mother so condemnatory?

2. What do you think of the title South of Broad? How does the setting inform the novel? Would the novel be very different if it were set in another city or region?

3. As a teenager, Leo is heavily penalized for refusing to name the boy who placed drugs in his pocket. Why did he feel compelled to protect the boy's identity? Do you think he did the right thing?

4. When Leo's mother asks him to meet his new peers, she warns, “Help them, but do not make friends with them.” Do you think such a thing possible? Through the novel, how does Leo help his friends, and how do they help him?

5. Leo's mother tells him, “We're afraid the orphans and the Poe kids will use you,” to which he responds, “I don't mind being needed. I don't even mind being used.” Do you think this is a healthy attitude toward friendship? Do any of the characters end up “using” Leo? Does his outlook on friendship changed by the end of the novel?

6. Leo admits that the years after Steven's suicide nearly killed him. How was he able to cope? How do Leo's parents deal with their grief? What does the novel say about human resilience and our propensity to overcome tragedy?

7. When Sheba suggests to Leo that he divorce his wife, he says, “I knew there were problems when I married Starla so I didn't walk into that marriage blind.” Do you think that knowledge obligates Leo to stay with his wife? In your opinion, does Leo do the right thing by staying married? Would you do the same?

8. Both Chad and Leo are unfaithful to their wives, but only Leo is truthful about it. Do you think this makes Chad's infidelity a worse offense? Why or why not?

9. At two points in the novel, the group tries to rescue a friend: first Niles, then Trevor. But when Starla is in trouble, they don't attempt to save her. Why do you think this is? Has Starla become a “lost cause”?

10. At one point Leo remarks, “I had trouble with the whole concept [of love] because I never fully learned the art of loving myself.” How does the concept of self-love play into the novel?

11. In the moment before Leo attacks Trevor's captor, he recites a portion of “Horatio at the Bridge,” a poem about taking a lone stand against fearful odds. What is the significance of the verse? Do you think it's appropriate to that moment?

12. The twins are the novel's most abused characters and also the most creative. Do you think there is a connection between suffering and art?

13. What do you make of the smiley face symbol that Sheba and Trevor's father paints? How does the novel address the idea of happiness coexisting with pain?

14. At several points in the novel, characters divulge family secrets. Do you believe that this information should stay secret, or is there value in bringing it to light?

15. Leo examines his Catholicism at several points in the novel. What do you think he might say are the advantages and drawbacks of his religion? Do you think all religions are fraught with those problems?

16. One might interpret Leo's mother's attitude toward religion as one of blind faith. If Steven had admitted his abuse to her, do you think she would she have believed him? How do you think the information might have affected her?

17. Sheba and Trevor are literally tormented by their childhoods, in the form of their deranged father. How are some of the other characters hindered by the past? Are they ever able to escape its clutches and, if so, by what means?

18. Discuss the scene in which Leo and Molly rescue the porpoise. What does the event symbolize?

19. Why do you think the discoveries about Leo's mother and Monsignor Max begin and end the novel? What theme do these incidents convey?

20. Chapter one begins with the statement, “Nothing happens by accident,” and Leo often reflects on the way that destiny has shaped his life. How does destiny affect the other characters? Do you agree that real life is the result of predetermined forces? Or can we affect our fate?

What Our Readers Are Saying

Add a comment for a chance to win!
Average customer rating based on 6 comments:

PQFanatic, February 9, 2011 (view all comments by PQFanatic)
Not my favorite Conroy book but he still has much to say. His sense of humor and his vivid character development stack up. Seems he is writing from a better place now.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(1 of 3 readers found this comment helpful)
bookishbabe, January 28, 2010 (view all comments by bookishbabe)
This was one of the BEST coming of age stories I've read in years. Race, sexuality and class come together beautifully. South of Broad includes a cast of characters whose conflicts and differences clash like the big bang theory. Yet surprisingly they are intricately bound over the years, up until and beyond the climactic end of one.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(3 of 6 readers found this comment helpful)
Lissa, January 6, 2010 (view all comments by Lissa)
I'm "reading" this book by listening to it on CD in my car - I find myself making excuses to drive more just to listen to it and I dislike driving and traffic! We already knew that Pat Conroy is a marvelous story teller - this book reminds me of a sophisticated and genteel Garrison Keillor (I grew up in MN). His characters are both true-to-life - within reach of belief, yet are inspirational. I absolutely love this book.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(4 of 8 readers found this comment helpful)
View all 6 comments

Product Details

ISBN:
9780385413053
Author:
Conroy, Pat
Publisher:
Nan A. Talese
Subject:
Bildungsromans
Subject:
Charleston (S.C.)
Subject:
General
Subject:
General Fiction
Subject:
Family saga
Subject:
Literature-A to Z
Copyright:
Publication Date:
20090831
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
528
Dimensions:
9.38x6.60x1.30 in. 1.91 lbs.

Other books you might like

  1. The Angel's Game
    Used Hardcover $6.50
  2. A Happy Marriage
    Used Trade Paper $3.95
  3. The Help
    Used Book Club Paperback $1.48
  4. The Lacuna
    Used Hardcover $7.50
  5. That Old Cape Magic
    Used Hardcover $5.95
  6. Last Night in Twisted River
    Used Book Club Paperback $1.95

Related Subjects

Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z

South of Broad Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$6.95 In Stock
Product details 528 pages Nan A. Talese - English 9780385413053 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Charleston, S.C., gossip columnist Leopold Bloom King narrates a paean to his hometown and friends in Conroy's first novel in 14 years. In the late '60s and after his brother commits suicide, then 18-year-old Leo befriends a cross-section of the city's inhabitants: scions of Charleston aristocracy; Appalachian orphans; a black football coach's son; and an astonishingly beautiful pair of twins, Sheba and Trevor Poe, who are evading their psychotic father. The story alternates between 1969, the glorious year Leo's coterie stormed Charleston's social, sexual and racial barricades, and 1989, when Sheba, now a movie star, enlists them to find her missing gay brother in AIDS-ravaged San Francisco. Too often the not-so-witty repartee and the narrator's awed voice (he is very fond of superlatives) overwhelm the stories surrounding the group's love affairs and their struggles to protect one another from dangerous pasts. Some characters are tragically lost to the riptides of love and obsession, while others emerge from the frothy waters of sentimentality and nostalgia as exhausted as most readers are likely to be. Fans of Conroy's florid prose and earnest melodramas are in for a treat. Justin Cartwright's doubleheader: a new novel and his love letter to Oxford." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review" by , "Conroy is an immensely gifted stylist, and there are passages in the novel that are lush and beautiful and precise. No one can describe a tide or a sunset with his lyricism and exactitude."
"Review" by , "[Conroy] reveals truths about love, lust, classism, racism, religion, and what it means to be shaped by a particular place, be it Charleston, South Carolina, or anywhere else in the U.S."
"Review" by , "Filled with the lyrical, funny, poignant language that is Conroy's birthright, this is a work Conroy fans will love."
"Synopsis" by , The one and only Pat Conroy returns with a big, sprawling novel that is at once a love letter to Charleston, South Carolina, and to lifelong friendship--a long-awaited work from a great American writer whose passion for life and language knows no bounds.
spacer
spacer
  • back to top

FOLLOW US ON...

     
Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.