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1 Burnside Literature- A to Z

Tell-All

by

Tell-All Cover

ISBN13: 9780385526357
ISBN10: 0385526350
Condition: Standard
Dustjacket: None
All Product Details

Only 1 left in stock at $8.50!

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

The hyperactive love child of Page Six and Whatever Happened to Baby Jane? caught in a tawdry love triangle with The Fan. Even Kitty Kelly will blush.

Soaked, nay, marinated in the world of vintage Hollywood, Tell-All is a Sunset Boulevard–inflected homage to Old Hollywood when Bette Davis and Joan Crawford ruled the roost; a veritable Tourette's syndrome of rat-tat-tat name-dropping, from the A-list to the Z-list; and a merciless send-up of Lillian Hellman's habit of butchering the truth that will have Mary McCarthy cheering from the beyond.

Our Thelma Ritter–ish narrator is Hazie Coogan, who for decades has tended to the outsized needs of Katherine "Miss Kathie" Kenton — veteran of multiple marriages, career comebacks, and cosmetic surgeries. But danger arrives with gentleman caller Webster Carlton Westward III, who worms his way into Miss Kathie's heart (and boudoir). Hazie discovers that this bounder has already written a celebrity tell-all memoir foretelling Miss Kathie's death in a forthcoming Lillian Hellman–penned musical extravaganza; as the body count mounts, Hazie must execute a plan to save Katherine Kenton for her fans — and for posterity.

Tell-All is funny, subversive, and fascinatingly clever. It's wild, it's wicked, it's bold-faced — it's vintage Chuck.

Review:

"Palahniuk's rude sendup of name-dropping and the culture of celebrity worship revolves around the fate of Katherine Kenton, a much-married star of stage, screen, and television, living in obscurity and searching for a comeback vehicle. Her story is told by Mazie Coogan — her Thelma Ritterish, straight-shooting confidant and protector — whose warning system sounds when Miss Kathie meets Webster Carlton Westward III, who quickly seduces his way into her Manhattan townhouse. It's soon revealed he's working on a memoir about his affair with Miss Kathie, the last chapter of which ends with her anticipated death, the details of which keep changing. The affair coincides with Miss Kathie's comeback in a bombastic Broadway extravaganza penned by Lillian Hellman (who receives inexplicably savage treatment). Throughout, Palahniuk drops names from the famous to the head-scratchingly obscure, peppers the narrative with neologisms supposedly coined by famous gossip columnists (ex-husbands are 'was-bands'), and annoyingly styles the text so that nearly every name, brand name, and fabulous venue appears in bold. Unfortunately, this gossipy fantasia is a one-joke premise that, even at its modest length, wears out its welcome well before Miss Kathie's final fade-out." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"The novel is over the top in Palahniuk's patented style, made even richer by some athletic wordplay. Even the structure of the book — three acts with the action described — is weird yet completely appropriate to the theme." The Oregonian

Review:

"Among the meta-fictional challenges the reader must confront within this narrative within a narrative within a narrative is what kind of book is Hazie writing (and we are reading). Meanwhile, the wordplay amuses." Kirkus Reviews

Review:

"At his best, Palahniuk punctures our collective psyches with sharp darts of satire, subversion, and surprise....Palahniuk stages some stunning scenes and pens some bawdily hilarious lines." Booklist

Review:

"Palahniuk still has considerable linguistic firepower and satirical humor, but here he puts it in service of a repetitive, predictable story, never fulfilling the promise of a great premise. Constant, bold-faced references to Tinseltown obscurities become annoying long before the end of a short book." Library Journal

Synopsis:

The hyperactive love child of Page Six and Whatever Happened to Baby Jane? caught in a tawdry love triangle with The Fan. Even Kitty Kelly will blush.

Soaked, nay, marinated in the world of vintage Hollywood, Tell-All is a Sunset Boulevard–inflected homage to Old Hollywood when Bette Davis and Joan Crawford ruled the roost; a veritable Tourette’s syndrome of rat-tat-tat  name-dropping, from the A-list to the Z-list; and a merciless  send-up of Lillian Hellman’s habit of butchering the truth that will have Mary McCarthy cheering from the beyond.

Our Thelma Ritter–ish narrator is Hazie Coogan, who for decades has tended to the outsized needs of Katherine “Miss Kathie”  Kenton—veteran of multiple marriages, career comebacks, and cosmetic surgeries. But danger arrives with gentleman caller Webster Carlton Westward III, who worms his way into Miss Kathie’s heart (and boudoir). Hazie discovers that this bounder has already written a celebrity tell-all memoir foretelling Miss Kathie’s death in a forthcoming Lillian Hellman–penned musical extravaganza; as the body count mounts, Hazie must execute a plan to save Katherine Kenton for her fans—and for posterity.

Tell-All is funny, subversive, and fascinatingly clever. It’s wild, it’s wicked, it’s  bold-faced—it’s vintage Chuck.

Video

About the Author

Chuck Palahniuk's bestselling books are Pygmy, Snuff, Rant, Haunted, Lullaby, Fight Club, Diary, Survivor, Invisible Monsters, and Choke. He is also the author of a nonfiction profile of Portland, Fugitives and Refugees, published as part of the Crown Journeys series, and the nonfiction collection Stranger than Fiction. He lives in the Pacific Northwest.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 3 comments:

William Kennedy, October 20, 2010 (view all comments by William Kennedy)
21 of 25 people found the following review helpful:
Half Formed Ideas, May 10, 2010


This review is from: Tell-All (Hardcover)
To criticize a Chuck Palahniuk book is to invite the howls of rabid fans who will die trying to convince you that either, you don't get it, or you're stupid. I guess I'm prepared for both.

I love literature, I love what words can do when put together by a master writer. Most of what I read are novels by the tried and true practitioners of the art form: Don Deillo, William Gaddis, Philip Roth, Paul Auster, Denis Johnson etc. So, Palahniuk is not necessarily my cup of tea in terms of literature, however, I have found several of his novels to be clever if not entertaining reads. Especially Lullaby and Diary.

In recent years Palahniuk has devlolved into writing some incredibly half hearted, almost insulting books. I hesitate to speak for him, but it comes across as though he knows full well he has a cult like following, and regardless of the quality of the work...it will sell.

Tell-All falls into the same category as his last two novels, "Snuff" and "Pygmy." It is brief and uninspired, an added twist seems to be present simply for the sake of itself. It is alluded to if not completely given away long before the final pages.

Palahniuk is a writer in love with gimmicks: be it sing-song repition, backwards counting page numbers, broken english etc. Most reviews have already mentioned the celebrity names in bold type, which in and of itself is not as bothersome as the lack of creativity in the writing.

I would love to see Palahniuk set himself to writing a novel that challenges not only his skills, but those of his readers. I can't help but thinking it's time for him to grow and mature as an artist, I don't want to believe that he reached his peak with "Diary."
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(2 of 3 readers found this comment helpful)
Clark, May 17, 2010 (view all comments by Clark)
Tell-All was decent. Was it as good as some of Palahniuk's other works? No. Was it still fun to read? Yes. I think the reason why many people are trashing this book is because they hold Palahniuk to a very high standard that he created for himself. With books such as Fight Club, Choke, and Survivor, fans expect "great" from Chuck Palahniuk. This book was "good" but it did not reach "great." Tell-All started out kind of slow but it gained momentum throughout the second half of the book. I wish it would have been longer because the second half was really good. Overall, a good book, but not great.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(3 of 6 readers found this comment helpful)
Annelle Hicks, May 15, 2010 (view all comments by Annelle Hicks)
just finished this today. and it wasn't his usual shock and awe but still classic chuck. it was definitily worth the wait as any chuck book is. go out and buy this and you will see a more mature, grown up chuck. excellent addition to your chuck library. will be patiently waiting, as best as any chuck fan can wait for the next adventure that he takes us on.
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(3 of 6 readers found this comment helpful)
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Product Details

ISBN:
9780385526357
Author:
Palahniuk, Chuck
Publisher:
Doubleday Books
Subject:
Hollywood (Los Angeles, Calif.)
Subject:
Romans áa clef.
Subject:
General
Subject:
General Fiction
Subject:
Literary
Subject:
Literature-A to Z
Copyright:
Publication Date:
20100531
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
192
Dimensions:
8.65 x 5.7 x .8 in .75 lb

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Related Subjects

Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z
Fiction and Poetry » Literature » Locked Case

Tell-All Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$8.50 In Stock
Product details 192 pages Doubleday - English 9780385526357 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Palahniuk's rude sendup of name-dropping and the culture of celebrity worship revolves around the fate of Katherine Kenton, a much-married star of stage, screen, and television, living in obscurity and searching for a comeback vehicle. Her story is told by Mazie Coogan — her Thelma Ritterish, straight-shooting confidant and protector — whose warning system sounds when Miss Kathie meets Webster Carlton Westward III, who quickly seduces his way into her Manhattan townhouse. It's soon revealed he's working on a memoir about his affair with Miss Kathie, the last chapter of which ends with her anticipated death, the details of which keep changing. The affair coincides with Miss Kathie's comeback in a bombastic Broadway extravaganza penned by Lillian Hellman (who receives inexplicably savage treatment). Throughout, Palahniuk drops names from the famous to the head-scratchingly obscure, peppers the narrative with neologisms supposedly coined by famous gossip columnists (ex-husbands are 'was-bands'), and annoyingly styles the text so that nearly every name, brand name, and fabulous venue appears in bold. Unfortunately, this gossipy fantasia is a one-joke premise that, even at its modest length, wears out its welcome well before Miss Kathie's final fade-out." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review" by , "The novel is over the top in Palahniuk's patented style, made even richer by some athletic wordplay. Even the structure of the book — three acts with the action described — is weird yet completely appropriate to the theme."
"Review" by , "Among the meta-fictional challenges the reader must confront within this narrative within a narrative within a narrative is what kind of book is Hazie writing (and we are reading). Meanwhile, the wordplay amuses."
"Review" by , "At his best, Palahniuk punctures our collective psyches with sharp darts of satire, subversion, and surprise....Palahniuk stages some stunning scenes and pens some bawdily hilarious lines."
"Review" by , "Palahniuk still has considerable linguistic firepower and satirical humor, but here he puts it in service of a repetitive, predictable story, never fulfilling the promise of a great premise. Constant, bold-faced references to Tinseltown obscurities become annoying long before the end of a short book."
"Synopsis" by , The hyperactive love child of Page Six and Whatever Happened to Baby Jane? caught in a tawdry love triangle with The Fan. Even Kitty Kelly will blush.

Soaked, nay, marinated in the world of vintage Hollywood, Tell-All is a Sunset Boulevard–inflected homage to Old Hollywood when Bette Davis and Joan Crawford ruled the roost; a veritable Tourette’s syndrome of rat-tat-tat  name-dropping, from the A-list to the Z-list; and a merciless  send-up of Lillian Hellman’s habit of butchering the truth that will have Mary McCarthy cheering from the beyond.

Our Thelma Ritter–ish narrator is Hazie Coogan, who for decades has tended to the outsized needs of Katherine “Miss Kathie”  Kenton—veteran of multiple marriages, career comebacks, and cosmetic surgeries. But danger arrives with gentleman caller Webster Carlton Westward III, who worms his way into Miss Kathie’s heart (and boudoir). Hazie discovers that this bounder has already written a celebrity tell-all memoir foretelling Miss Kathie’s death in a forthcoming Lillian Hellman–penned musical extravaganza; as the body count mounts, Hazie must execute a plan to save Katherine Kenton for her fans—and for posterity.

Tell-All is funny, subversive, and fascinatingly clever. It’s wild, it’s wicked, it’s  bold-faced—it’s vintage Chuck.

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