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Original Essays | September 30, 2014

Benjamin Parzybok: IMG A Brief History of Video Games Played by Mayors, Presidents, and Emperors



Brandon Bartlett, the fictional mayor of Portland in my novel Sherwood Nation, is addicted to playing video games. In a city he's all but lost... Continue »
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2 Burnside Literature- A to Z

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The Healing

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The Healing Cover

 

 

Reading Group Guide

1. How does Polly Shine’s approach to medical treatment differ from that of the white doctors who previously treated the Satterfield slaves? What does she mean when she says, “The magic weren’t in the food. It was in the seeing”? Does the way a doctor sees his or her patients determine the prescribed treatment? In your experience, how important is the personal connection between doctor and patient?

2. Many popular works that address interracial relationships rely on a formula of a benevolent white savior empowering downtrodden blacks. Can you think of any books or films that employ this trope? What would Polly Shine say about this? How would she react to history books that claim that African Americans were “given” their freedom, or “given” the right to vote?

3. The “magic negro,” who, by use of special insight or powers helps the white protagonist, is a supporting archetype in fiction. Can you think of any examples of this stock character in other works? Does Polly Shine perpetuate the stereotype of the magic negro, or dispel it?   

4. Of what significance are role models in The Healing? How important is it for children to see a reflection of themselves in the powerful and successful people around them?

5. In his research for The Healing, Jonathan Odell consulted an oral history project conducted by the WPA in the 1930s in which thousands of surviving former slaves were interviewed. There were some who said that given the poverty, discrimination, and random brutality they had experienced in the twentieth century, they wished they were still slaves under their old masters. Indeed, Master Satterfield in The Healing is not stereotypically cruel. Are there any instances when he seems sympathetic to his slaves?  Does servitude under a kind tyrant make such a system less objectionable or more?

6. Gran Gran tells Violet, “After Freedom, everybody all of a sudden had to decide where he or she belonged. Nobody to tell them no more. Wasn’t easy for some of us. . . . Some of us picked wrong, I reckon.” What does she mean? How do the other Satterfield slaves satisfy their need for belonging after freedom? What choice does Silas make? Sylvie? Chester?

7. When Rubina turns to Polly for an abortion, the question arises of who has authority over Rubina’s body—the slave master, God, the people, or Rubina herself. Do you think Polly makes the right decision? After 150 years, how does this issue still surface in American life?

8. In the 1950s the medical establishment began a coordinated campaign to discredit midwives, who were still the major health-care providers to rural black women in the South. Yet years after the medical establishment won the battle, statistics showed that in many instances the live birth rate was higher among the black midwives than under the white, professionally trained doctors who replaced them. Why do you think this was so?

9. Polly talks about a “two-headed snake of Freedom” that will bite not only the Master, but the slave as well. What does she mean? And do the events of the novel play out this way?

10. Why doesn’t Polly take Granada with her? Do you agree with her decision?

11. What role does storytelling play in The Healing? How does it influence individuals, communities, and nations? How does the concept of “story” apply to contemporary methods of healing?

Product Details

ISBN:
9780385534673
Author:
Odell, Jonathan
Publisher:
Nan A. Talese
Subject:
Literature-A to Z
Subject:
Literature-Coming of Age
Copyright:
Publication Date:
20120431
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Language:
English
Pages:
352
Dimensions:
9.53 x 6.58 x 1.32 in 1.42 lb
Age Level:
Literature-Coming of Age

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Related Subjects

Featured Titles » Literature
Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z
Fiction and Poetry » Literature » African American » Historical
Fiction and Poetry » Literature » Coming of Age
Fiction and Poetry » Literature » Cultural Heritage
Fiction and Poetry » Literature » New Arrivals

The Healing Used Hardcover
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Product details 352 pages Nan A. Talese - English 9780385534673 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Bringing exciting verisimilitude to an overworked genre, this Southern saga from Odell (The View from Delphi) is rich in character and incident, but suffers from an awkward generation-bridging flashback structure. In the 1930s, elderly former slave Granada — a longtime midwife and healer — lives in the old kitchen of the once-imposing Satterfield Plantation and takes in Violet, a terrified seven-year-old. To soothe the girl's nerves and to explain the legion of mysterious clay masks that fill the dilapidated mansion, Granada tells stories about her past, launching a series of vividly imagined, but momentum-destroying, scenes of pre — Civil War plantation life. As a young girl, Granada first served Amanda Satterfield (the opium-addled plantation mistress) as a house servant, plaything, and instrument to embarrass her husband. After the arrival of Polly Shine — a healer purchased to treat the slaves — Granada is banished from the big house and sent as a reluctant apprentice to Polly's four-room hospital. The relationship between the two women evolves in predictable but engaging fashion. Despite the novel's nuanced characters, Odell insists on uniting the two time lines with a hokey stab at significance toward the end. Had Odell allowed his vibrant characters to guide the narrative, rather than relying on a clichéd plot structure, this might have been a small Southern masterpiece." Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
"Synopsis" by , US
"Synopsis" by , The pre-Civil War South comes brilliantly to life in this masterfully written novel about a mysterious and charismatic healer readers won’t soon forget.

 

Mississippi plantation mistress Amanda Satterfield loses her daughter to cholera after her husband refuses to treat her for what he considers to be a “slave disease.” Insane with grief, Amanda takes a newborn slave child as her own and names her Granada, much to the outrage of her husband and the amusement of their white neighbors. Troubled by his wife’s disturbing mental state and concerned about a mysterious plague sweeping through his slave population, Master Satterfield purchases Polly Shine, a slave reputed to be a healer. But Polly’s sharp tongue and troubling predictions cause unrest across the plantation. Complicating matters further, Polly recognizes “the gift” in Granada, the mistress’s pet, and a domestic battle of wills ensues.  

 

Seventy-five years later, Granada, now known as Gran Gran, is still living on the plantation and must revive the buried memories of her past in order to heal a young girl abandoned to her care. Together they learn the power of story to heal the body, the spirit and the soul. 

 

Rich in mood and atmosphere, The Healing is the kind of novel readers can’t put down—and can’t wait to recommend once they’ve finished.

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