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The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants

by

The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants Cover

ISBN13: 9780385729338
ISBN10: 0385729332
Condition: Standard
Dustjacket: Standard
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Author Q & A

Talking with Ann Brashares about The Sisterhood

How did you come up with the book’s unique central concept? Why traveling pants?

The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants was born in an unusual way. I was working as an editor at the time, chatting in the office with a colleague and friend who told me about a summer when she and some girl friends shared a pair of pants. She told me the pants had sadly been lost in Borneo. My mind was immediately filled with all sorts of wonderful possibilities.

I think pants have unique qualities, especially in a woman’s life. Whatever bodily insecurities we have, we seem to take out on our pants. In high school, my friends would have their skinny pants and their fat pants. I like pants that allow women not to judge their bodies. The Traveling Pants are the kind of pants that always love you. They fit my characters’ bodies in a non-restrictive way.

Describe your favorite pair of pants. What makes them your favorite?

At the moment, my favorite pair of pants are bright red. They are cropped, slightly flared summer pants. Like a good friend, they are flexible, forgiving, and boost my confidence even on really off days. They are low maintenance pants–never requiring dry cleaning or even ironing. The waistline is zippered and definite, so it doesn't have that subtly defeated quality of elastic. And these pants manage to make me feel loved even through major body transitions (like having a baby!).

This story should resonate with young women because sharing clothes is such an integral part of many female friendships. Did you have a clothes-sharing experience that helped to shape the book?

The concept of The Pants is directly related to my experience with my wedding dress. Before I had chosen a wedding dress, I had a picture in my mind of what mine would look like. One day, my mom and I were touring wedding venues in the Washington, DC area where I grew up. Our guide showed us some wedding photographs, and one of them showed a bride wearing a dress just like the one I had imagined. The tour guide invited me to take the picture home, so I did, and I left it in my drawer.

A few months later, the sister of a friend, a young woman named Hope, asked if I had picked my wedding dress. I hadn't. Hope’s recent wedding hadn’t worked out. She wasn't broken-hearted about the groom, but she was broken-hearted about her beautiful, amazing dress not being worn. She asked me if I would consider wearing it at my wedding. I didn't know Hope very well, so I politely declined a few times. Yet she was strangely insistent and later arrived at our friend's apartment with a huge box. Through the clear plastic front I could see that the dress inside was remarkably familiar. It was exactly the same as the dress in the photograph I had put in my drawer. I was ecstatic.

I tried to give the dress back to Hope, after I had worn it in my wedding, but she didn't want it.

So I decided, in the spirit of her generosity, that it was a fortuitous, serendipitous kind of dress, and needed to be shared some more. Since then, it has been worn beautifully by my older brother's wife, my middle brother's wife, and my lifelong best friend. These are probably the three women I am closest to in my life–my own sisterhood. I'm hoping it will be worn again. In fact, I am imagining that instead of the next bride throwing the bouquet at the end of the wedding, she can ball up my wedding dress and throw that.

Much of the novel takes place in Baja and Greece. Did travel play an influential role in your childhood or teenage years?

I love to travel and have taken a lot of trips, but have never actually been to either Baja or Greece. I did a lot of reading and imagining for those stories. They existed more in my imagination than any place else. I love islands. I loved that Oia, the town where Lena’s grandparents lived, was stuck in time and had this geological drama in the background.

I grew up in Chevy Chase, Maryland, which was very Plain Jane. When I was a kid, I had a scrapbook that I used to write letters in from places I wished I could have gone. I would imagine being in Argentina and then write about all the incredible things I was seeing there. This book is almost like a continuation of those imaginary years.

How old were you when you first fell in love? Who was he? Where were you?

I first fell in love when I was 14 or 15, but it wasn’t immediate falling in love, it was a slow… slow fall. The person I fell in love with immediately was my husband. He is an artist and we met during my freshman year at Barnard. He sat across from me and drew a picture of me in the Columbia University Philosophy Reading Room. I hadn’t even noticed him, but a friend of mine saw what he was doing and told me. As soon as I went out with him, that was it. It was the first time I felt like I loved someone instantly. We’ve been together ever since.

You’ve written about four very different girls. Are the characters in this book based on people you know or wish you had known?

Oddly enough, they aren’t. They are composites of different people. I based Lena's story on the Greek myth of Artemis, the proud, boy-hating goddess of the hunt who, when spotted bathing by a suitor, turns the poor guy into a stag. I wanted my Lena to be less pleased with herself, though, and for her suitor to be more formidable. The story of Tibby and Bailey I based on the great, great movie It's a Wonderful Life. Bailey started out more like an angel than a person. I imagined her as an angel who revealed the cynical little prejudices and presumptions that I remember finding so seductive when I was fifteen. Carmen was the girl who said things I could never say and Bridget was the girl who did things I would never do.

Who are you most like: Carmen, Tibby, Bridget or Lena?

There’s a little bit of me in each of them. I would say I have more in common with Lena and Carmen than the other two. I have some life experience in common with Carmen, but we are considerably different too. I am a little like Carmen in that I sometimes feel as if I lose myself when I'm out of context. Also, I have dealt with issues of divorce and step families. For the protection of the innocent, though, I must say that my own family circumstances were completely different than hers. As for Lena, I guess I know what it is to feel awkward and inward sometimes, and romantically, to feel like a big chicken. Sometimes the girls provided me with an escape or a fantasy.

Why did you choose Carmen to set up the story?

Carmen struck me as the person who was most conscious–who recognized the importance of the girls’ friendship. She didn’t just live it, she knew it inside and out. I think she’s the most introspective of the four.

What do you think are the most important aspects of female relationships?

Loyalty and love. And I mean the kind of love that parents have–unconditional. So often, relationships become competitive or marked by pettiness or envy. For relationships to really transcend the negative stuff in life, they need to be without judgement. I wanted to create a story about a rare bunch of girls who didn't succumb to malice or jealousy and, instead, learned to grow alongside each other and in support of each other. I like the idea in this book, particularly for Carmen, that they are just going to love each other whole-heartedly, no matter what.

Do you think those things change as people get older?

I think that relationships do change over time. And that’s another reason why Carmen has the role she does. She has an awareness that the relationship is fragile and that so many other priorities, like boyfriends or distance, can get in the way. People’s lives inevitably go in different directions as they get older, when they stop having so much in common. They have to work not to let it go.

What do you hope teens will take away from reading The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants?

Honestly, I mostly hope they'll enjoy it and take pleasure away. I want it to be the kind of book that will stick with them a bit, the way books I liked when I was that age stuck with me. If there's a message, I guess it's just this: love yourself and your friends unconditionally.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 3 comments:

kassy_chris, November 1, 2007 (view all comments by kassy_chris)
This book was completely and totally full of excitement and heart-racing moments that you don't want to miss. I highly recommend it.
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(26 of 31 readers found this comment helpful)
aka_maria1234, October 27, 2006 (view all comments by aka_maria1234)
As a fifteen year old girl, I think this book is awesome!!! The setting, the main idea, the characters is perfect. It couldn't be better. I like it because they are teenagers, like me, and it really inflences friendships in this world. I love this book.
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(20 of 34 readers found this comment helpful)
clau201, September 25, 2006 (view all comments by clau201)
this book is just awesome! it's written beautifully and the characters are very real you will probably be able to identify with one or more of them. I love this book!
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(21 of 44 readers found this comment helpful)
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Product Details

ISBN:
9780385729338
Author:
Brashares, Ann
Publisher:
Delacorte Press
Author:
Shaw, Tucker
Location:
New York
Subject:
Girls & Women
Subject:
Friendship
Subject:
Children's 12-Up - Fiction - General
Subject:
Social Situations - Friendship
Subject:
Conduct of life
Subject:
Best friends
Subject:
Jeans (Clothing)
Subject:
Pants.
Subject:
Jeans
Subject:
Social Issues - Friendship
Subject:
Situations / Friendship
Subject:
Children s Young Adult-Social Issue Fiction-Friendship
Subject:
Children s Young Adult-Social Issue Fiction
Subject:
fiction;young adult;friendship;ya;coming of age;teen;summer;romance;chick lit;girls;friends;realistic fiction;travel;pants;movie;jeans;family;greece;death;love;relationships;sisterhood;sisterhood of the traveling pants;young adult fiction;growing up;high
Subject:
fiction;young adult;friendship;ya;coming of age;teen;summer;romance;chick lit;girls;friends;realistic fiction;travel;pants;movie;jeans;family;greece;death;love;relationships;sisterhood;sisterhood of the traveling pants;young adult fiction;growing up;high
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Hardcover
Series:
Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants
Series Volume:
no. 54
Publication Date:
September 2001
Binding:
Hardback
Grade Level:
from 7
Language:
English
Pages:
320
Dimensions:
8.52 x 5.88 in.
Age Level:
12-17

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Related Subjects


Children's » General
Young Adult » Fiction » Social Issues » Friendship
Young Adult » General

The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$3.25 In Stock
Product details 320 pages RANDOM HOUSE TRADE - English 9780385729338 Reviews:
"Review" by , "Brashares deftly moves from narrative to narrative, weaving together themes from the mundane to the profoundly important, from death to raging hormones, from stepfamilies to dead-end minimum-wage jobs....A complex book about a solid group of friends, with each one a strong and courageous individual in her own right."
"Review" by , "Debut novelist Brashares renders each girl individual and lovable in her own right, emphasizing growing up without growing apart. Move over, Ya Ya Sisters."
"Review" by , "This tale of four teenage girls and a magic pair of bluejeans they find and share one summer has resonated far more deeply than any of the grown-up novels I've read this year."
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