Knockout Narratives Sale
 
 

Special Offers see all

Enter to WIN a $100 Credit

Subscribe to PowellsBooks.news
for a chance to win.
Privacy Policy

Visit our stores


    Recently Viewed clear list


    The Powell's Playlist | January 5, 2015

    Tim Johnston: IMG The Powell's Playlist: Songs for Not Sleeping by Tim Johnston



    I once told a medical-profession-type lady that I didn't sleep well, that I awoke all through the night and was awake for hours. "What do you do... Continue »

    spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$7.95
List price: $16.99
Used Hardcover
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
Qty Store Section
1 Beaverton Children's- Newbery Award Winners
2 Beaverton Children's Middle Readers- General

Moon Over Manifest

by

Moon Over Manifest Cover

ISBN13: 9780385738835
ISBN10: 0385738838
Condition: Standard
Dustjacket: Standard
All Product Details

Only 3 left in stock at $7.95!

 

 

Excerpt

Santa Fe Railway    

Southeast Kansas    

MAY 27, 1936    

The movement of the train rocked me like a lullaby. I closed my eyes to the dusty countryside and imagined the sign I knew only from stories. The one just outside of town with big blue letters: manifest: a town with a rich past and a bright future.  

I thought about my daddy, Gideon Tucker. He does his best talking in stories, but in recent weeks, those had become few and far between. So on the occasion when he'd say to me, "Abilene, did I ever tell you 'bout the time . . . ?" I'd get all quiet and listen real hard. Mostly he'd tell stories about Manifest, the town where he'd lived once upon a time.   His words drew pictures of brightly painted storefronts and bustling townsfolk. Hearing Gideon tell about it was like sucking on butterscotch. Smooth and sweet. And when he'd go back to not saying much, I'd try recalling what it tasted like. Maybe that was how I found comfort just then, even with him being so far away. By remembering the flavor of his words. But mostly, I could taste the sadness in his voice when he told me I couldn't stay with him for the summer while he worked a railroad job back in Iowa. Something had changed in him. It started the day I got a cut on my knee. It got bad and I got real sick with infection. The doctors said I was lucky to come out of it. But it was like Gideon had gotten a wound in him too. Only he didn't come out of it. Andit was painful enough to make him send me away.   I reached into my satchel for the flour sack that held my few special things. A blue dress, two shiny dimes I'd earned collecting pop bottles, a letter from Gideon telling folks that I would be received by Pastor Howard at the Manifest depot, and my most special something, kept in a box lined with an old 1917 Manifest Herald newspaper: my daddy's compass.  

In a gold case, it wore like a pocket watch, but inside was a compass showing every direction. Only problem was, a working compass always points north. This one, the arrow dangled and jiggled every which way. It wasn't even that old. It had the compass maker's name and the date it was made on the inside. St. Dizier, October 8, 1918. Gideon had always planned to get it fixed, but when I was leaving, he said he didn't need it anyway, what with train tracks to guide him. Still, I liked imagining that the chain of that broken compass was long enough to stretch all the way back into his pocket, with him at one end and me at the other.  

Smoothing out the yellowed newspaper for the thousandth time, I scanned the page, hoping to find some bit of news about or insight into my daddy. But there was only the same old "Hogs and Cattle" report on one side and a "Hattie Mae's News Auxiliary: Charter Edition" on the other, plus a couple of advertisements for Liberty Bonds and Billy Bump's Hair Tonic. I didn't know anything about Hattie Mae Harper, except what she wrote in her article, but I figured her newspaper column had protected Gideon's compass for some time, and for that I felt a sense of gratitude. I carefully placed the newspaper back in the box and stored the box in the satchel, but held on to the compass. I guess I just needed to hold on to something.  

The conductor came into the car. "Manifest, next stop."  

The seven-forty-five evening train was going to be right on time. Conductors only gave a few minutes' notice, so I had to hurry. I shoved the compass into a side pocket of the satchel, then made my way to the back of the last car. Being a paying customer this time, with a full-fledged ticket, I didn't have to jump off, and I knew that the preacher would be waiting for me. But as anyone worth his salt knows, it's best to get a look at a place before it gets a look at you. I'd worn my overalls just for the occasion. Besides, it wouldn't be dark for another hour, so I'd have time to find my way around.  

At the last car, I waited, listening the way I'd been taught--wait till the clack of the train wheels slows to the rhythm of your heartbeat. The trouble is my heart speeds up when I'm looking at the ground rushing by. Finally, I saw a grassy spot and jumped. The ground came quick and hard, but I landed and rolled as the train lumbered on without a thank-you or goodbye.  

What Our Readers Are Saying

Add a comment for a chance to win!
Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

k581marie, July 14, 2012 (view all comments by k581marie)
A wonderful book! Great story about a 12 year old girl in 1936 living in the small town of Manifest, Kansas trying to find out about her father's life 20 years earlier by reading letters, talking to older citizens, reading newspaper articles and investigating the town with her two friends. It includes mystery, history and suspense which all tie together at the end. The reader learns about human interactions, small town dynamics, friendship and love. A YA book that adults will cherish.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No

Product Details

ISBN:
9780385738835
Author:
Vanderpool, Clare
Publisher:
Delacorte Press Books for Young Readers
Author:
Nickerson, Sara
Author:
Lewis Tyre, Lisa
Author:
Lisa Lewis Tyre
Author:
Preus, Margi
Author:
Phillips, Gin
Subject:
Kansas
Subject:
Depressions -- 1929.
Subject:
Historical - United States - 20th Century
Subject:
Mysteries, Espionage, & Detective Stories
Subject:
Social Issues - Friendship
Subject:
Children s-Historical Fiction-U.S. 20th Century
Subject:
historical fiction;newbery;fiction;kansas;mystery;great depression;wwi;immigrants;newbery medal;family;ya;secrets;1930s;prohibition;depression;friendship;fathers;young adult;historical;small town;fathers and daughters;history;juvenile fiction;children s;c
Subject:
historical fiction;newbery;fiction;kansas;mystery;great depression;wwi;immigrants;newbery medal;family;ya;secrets;1930s;prohibition;depression;friendship;fathers;young adult;historical;small town;fathers and daughters;history;juvenile fiction;children s;c
Subject:
Situations / Friendship
Subject:
historical fiction;newbery;fiction;kansas;mystery;great depression;wwi;immigrants;newbery medal;family;ya;secrets;1930s;prohibition;young adult;depression;historical;friendship;fathers;small town;history;children s;children;fathers and daughters;juvenile
Subject:
Mysteries & Detective Stories
Edition Description:
Hardback
Publication Date:
20101031
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Grade Level:
from 5
Language:
English
Illustrations:
4 archival photographs
Pages:
176
Dimensions:
8.25 x 5.5 x 1 in
Age Level:
09-12

Other books you might like

  1. Interrupting Chicken Used Book Club Hardcover $8.95
  2. Venn Perplexors Level C New Pamphlet $12.95
  3. Venn Perplexors Level D New Pamphlet $12.95

Related Subjects


Children's » Activities » General
Children's » Awards » Newbery Award Winners
Children's » Featured Titles
Children's » General
Children's » Historical Fiction » General
Children's » Historical Fiction » United States » 20th Century
Children's » Middle Readers » General
Children's » Middle Readers » Newbery Award Winners
Children's » Sale Books
Featured Titles » Award Winners
Young Adult » Fiction » Newbery Award Winners
Young Adult » Fiction » Social Issues » Friendship

Moon Over Manifest Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$7.95 In Stock
Product details 176 pages Delacorte Books for Young Readers - English 9780385738835 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Set in 1936, this memorable coming-of-age story follows 12-year-old Abilene Tucker's unusual summer in her father's hometown of Manifest, Kans., while he's away on a railroad job. Having had an itinerant upbringing, Abilene is eager to connect to her father's childhood, a goal that proves difficult. The immigrant town has become rundown, but is populated with well-developed, idiosyncratic characters and has a dynamic past involving the KKK, an influenza scare, and a bootlegging operation. Manifest's history emerges in stories recounted by Miss Sadie (a Hungarian medium) and in news columns written in 1917 by Hattie Mae Harper, 'Reporter About Town.' With new friends Lettie and Ruthanne, Abilene pieces together the past, coming to understand, as Miss Sadie says, that 'maybe what you're looking for is not so much the mark your daddy made on this town, but the mark the town made on your daddy.' Witty, bold, and curious, Abilene is as unforgettable as the other residents of Manifest, and the variety of voices allows the town's small mysteries to bloom. Replete with historical details and surprises, Vanderpool's debut delights, while giving insight into family and community. Ages 9 — 12. (Oct.)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright PWyxz LLC)
"Synopsis" by ,
An authentic coming-of-age story about finding magic in the every day—perfect for fans of Rebecca Stead, Joan Bauer, and Wendy Mass.

Olivia and her mom have just moved in with her grandmother, and Olivia has exactly zero friends at her new school.  But after a strange message on the bathroom wall of a café catches her eye, Olivia decides that Birmingham, Alabama, may be a little more interesting than it seems.  So begins a search for answers that takes her all over the city.  Luckily, her mission isnt solitary for long, thanks to her newfound friendship with Amelia, a girl just odd enough to be intriguing.

What the girls discover isnt the earth-shattering revelation they were hoping for, but it may be just as compelling.  After all, sometimes the journey really is more important than the destination.  Especially when it leads you back home.

"Synopsis" by ,
Debut novelist Lisa Lewis Tyre vibrantly brings a small town and its outspoken characters to life, as she explores race and other community issues from both the Civil War and the present day.

 

Lou might be only twelve, but shes never been one to take things sitting down. So when her Civil War-era house is about to be condemned, shes determined to save it—either by getting it deemed a historic landmark or by finding the stash of gold rumored to be hidden nearby during the war. As Lou digs into the past, her eyes are opened when she finds that her ancestors ran the gamut of slave owners, renegades, thieves and abolitionists. Meanwhile, some incidents in her town show her that many Civil War era prejudices still survive and that the past can keep repeating itself if we let it. Digging into her past shows Lou that its never too late to fight injustice, and she starts to see the real value of understanding and exploring her roots.

spacer
spacer
  • back to top

FOLLOW US ON...

     
Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.