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M-A-C-N-O-L-I-A: Poems

M-A-C-N-O-L-I-A: Poems Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Review:

"The first African-American student to reach the final round of the National Spelling Bee, 13-year-old MacNolia Cox of Akron, Ohio, found short-lived celebrity in 1936; when she died 40 years later, the girl who 'was almost/ The national spelling champ' had become a cleaning woman, a grandmother, and 'the best damn maid in town.' Cox's ambition and her later frustration find incisive shape in this remarkably varied meditation on ambition, racism, discouragement and ennui, where successive pages can bring to mind a handbook of poetic forms (a double sestina, Japanese-inspired syllabics, a blues ghazal and prose poems based on definitions of prepositions), Ann Carson's 'TV Men' poems, Rita Dove's Thomas and Beulah and the documentary film Spellbound. Jordan (Rise) begins in Cox's later life, giving voice to her husband, John Montiere, at 'The Moment Before He Asks MacNolia Out on a Date,' then to MacNolia herself when in 1970 her son dies just after his return from Vietnam. As counterpoints, Jordan intersperses poems about African-Americans who won more lasting public acclaim, among them Richard Pryor, Josephine Baker and the great labor organizer and orator A. Philip Randolph. Jordan's most quotable poems, however, return to the voice of the 13-year-old speller, who 'learned the word chiaroscuro/ By rolling it on my tongue// Like cotton candy the color/ Of day and night.' (June)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Synopsis:

IN 1936, teenager MacNolia Cox became the first African American finalist in the National Spelling Bee Competition. Supposedly prevented from winning, the precocious child who dreamed of becoming a doctor was changed irrevocably. Her story, told in a poignant nonlinear narrative, illustrates the power of a pivotal moment in a life.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780393059076
Subtitle:
Poems
Publisher:
W. W. Norton & Company
Author:
Jordan, A. Van
Location:
New York
Subject:
General
Subject:
American - African American
Subject:
African American teenage girls
Subject:
Spelling bees
Edition Number:
1st ed.
Series Volume:
1
Publication Date:
June 2004
Binding:
Hardcover
Language:
English
Pages:
134
Dimensions:
8.60x5.72x.66 in. .68 lbs.

Related Subjects

Fiction and Poetry » Poetry » A to Z

M-A-C-N-O-L-I-A: Poems
0 stars - 0 reviews
$ In Stock
Product details 134 pages W. W. Norton & Company - English 9780393059076 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "The first African-American student to reach the final round of the National Spelling Bee, 13-year-old MacNolia Cox of Akron, Ohio, found short-lived celebrity in 1936; when she died 40 years later, the girl who 'was almost/ The national spelling champ' had become a cleaning woman, a grandmother, and 'the best damn maid in town.' Cox's ambition and her later frustration find incisive shape in this remarkably varied meditation on ambition, racism, discouragement and ennui, where successive pages can bring to mind a handbook of poetic forms (a double sestina, Japanese-inspired syllabics, a blues ghazal and prose poems based on definitions of prepositions), Ann Carson's 'TV Men' poems, Rita Dove's Thomas and Beulah and the documentary film Spellbound. Jordan (Rise) begins in Cox's later life, giving voice to her husband, John Montiere, at 'The Moment Before He Asks MacNolia Out on a Date,' then to MacNolia herself when in 1970 her son dies just after his return from Vietnam. As counterpoints, Jordan intersperses poems about African-Americans who won more lasting public acclaim, among them Richard Pryor, Josephine Baker and the great labor organizer and orator A. Philip Randolph. Jordan's most quotable poems, however, return to the voice of the 13-year-old speller, who 'learned the word chiaroscuro/ By rolling it on my tongue// Like cotton candy the color/ Of day and night.' (June)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Synopsis" by , IN 1936, teenager MacNolia Cox became the first African American finalist in the National Spelling Bee Competition. Supposedly prevented from winning, the precocious child who dreamed of becoming a doctor was changed irrevocably. Her story, told in a poignant nonlinear narrative, illustrates the power of a pivotal moment in a life.
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