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Comfort: A Journey through Grief

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Comfort: A Journey through Grief Cover

ISBN13: 9780393064568
ISBN10: 0393064565
Condition:
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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

A moving and remarkable memoir about the sudden death of a daughter, surviving grief, and learning to love again.

In 2002, Ann Hood's five-year-old daughter Grace died suddenly from a virulent form of strep throat. Stunned and devastated, the family searched for comfort in a time when none seemed possible. Hood — an accomplished novelist — was unable to read or write. She could only reflect on her lost daughter — "the way she looked splashing in the bathtub...the way we sang 'Eight Days a Week.'" One day, a friend suggested she learn to knit. Knitting soothed her and gave her something to do. Eventually, she began to read and write again. A semblance of normalcy returned, but grief, in ever new and different forms, still held the family. What they could not know was that comfort would come, and in surprising ways. Hood traces her descent into grief and reveals how she found comfort and hope again — a journey to recovery that culminates with a newly adopted daughter.

Review:

"The first six pages of this wrenchingly honest memoir of Hood's daughter's death and its aftermath read like a tightly controlled scream. All the platitudes, the dozens of words of comfort that people offer — 'time heals,' 'she is in a better place' — are interspersed with Hood's silent, furious responses to these 'lies,' with special scorn for those who say, 'Are you writing this down?' The death of her five-year-old Grace in 2002 was completely unexpected: an ordinary strep throat somehow ravaged the organs of her small body. Hood (The Knitting Circle) takes readers through the slow, jagged steps of dealing with grief. Unable to write, she first took refuge in endless knitting, then got a tattoo on Grace's sixth birthday. Hiding from the Beatles' songs her daughter had loved, she found them so ubiquitous that she could finally listen only to talk radio. Grace's little shoes stood sentinel at the top of the stairs and three years passed before Hood could bear to clean her room. But there is redemption at the end of this short, anguished book. Hood and her husband have a new daughter, Annabelle, adopted from China, and at last, Hood can celebrate Mother's Day, albeit with a 'strange mixture of grief and joy.'" Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"A loving tribute by turns harrowing and beautiful." Kirkus Reviews

Review:

"I will most likely never again eat pasta with butter and Parmesan or cucumbers cut in perfect rounds...without thinking of Ann Hood and her daughter." Los Angeles Times

Review:

"Akin to Joan Didion's The Year of Magical Thinking, Comfort beautifully discovers images and details to describe [Hood's] agony." Providence Journal

Book News Annotation:

In 2002 novelist Hood's five year old daughter died suddenly from a virulent form of strep throat. For a time Hood was unable to read or write, and could only reflect on her loss. One day a friend suggested she should learn to knit to give her something else to do. As she learned the mechanical motions that lead eventually to an expression of love in yarn form, Hood began to read and write again. She also learned that although a type of normalcy could return, grief still came in new and different forms. She traces her descent into grief fully and reveals the people, animals and places that gave her hope once again, including the coast of Maine, a three-legged horse, water, birds, her knitting circle, hiding, and her newly adopted daughter. Annotation ©2009 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Synopsis:

Ann Hood offers a moving and remarkable memoir about the sudden death of a daughter, surviving grief, and learning to love again.

Synopsis:

In 2002, Ann Hood's five-year-old daughter Grace died suddenly from a virulent form of strep throat. Stunned and devastated, the family searched for comfort in a time when none seemed possible. Hood--an accomplished novelist--was unable to read or write. She could only reflect on her lost daughter--"the way she looked splashing in the bathtub ... the way we sang 'Eight Days a Week.'" One day, a friend suggested she learn to knit. Knitting soothed her and gave her something to do. Eventually, she began to read and write again. A semblance of normalcy returned, but grief, in ever new and different forms, still held the family. What they could not know was that comfort would come, and in surprising ways. Hood traces her descent into grief and reveals how she found comfort and hope again--a journey to recovery that culminates with a newly adopted daughter.

About the Author

Ann Hood is the author of nine books, including the novel The Knitting Circle. Her work has appeared in The Paris Review, Tin House, and O Magazine. She lives in Providence, Rhode Island.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

Pat Shannon, June 3, 2008 (view all comments by Pat Shannon)
I am a "grief junkie" - reading everything I can get my hands on that will teach me about loss; most especially how to live through it. This book offered me truth; the truth of rage and of the scorn for those who think their platitudes can ease your pain. The truth of time; that it can take years to put away the shoes or clean the room. The truth that life, however, does go on. And the truth that the heart is created to heal. It is not just that the heart has the capacity, it has the purpose. Ann Hood lets the truth of that purpose speak. Her work is a blessing.
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Product Details

ISBN:
9780393064568
Author:
Hood, Ann
Publisher:
W. W. Norton & Company
Subject:
Personal Memoirs
Subject:
Children
Subject:
Death
Subject:
Death, Grief, Bereavement
Subject:
Grief
Subject:
Consolation
Subject:
Biography - General
Publication Date:
20080531
Binding:
Hardcover
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
192
Dimensions:
7.33x4.98x.77 in. .53 lbs.

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Related Subjects

Biography » General
Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z
Health and Self-Help » Self-Help » Grief

Comfort: A Journey through Grief New Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$18.75 In Stock
Product details 192 pages W. W. Norton & Company - English 9780393064568 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "The first six pages of this wrenchingly honest memoir of Hood's daughter's death and its aftermath read like a tightly controlled scream. All the platitudes, the dozens of words of comfort that people offer — 'time heals,' 'she is in a better place' — are interspersed with Hood's silent, furious responses to these 'lies,' with special scorn for those who say, 'Are you writing this down?' The death of her five-year-old Grace in 2002 was completely unexpected: an ordinary strep throat somehow ravaged the organs of her small body. Hood (The Knitting Circle) takes readers through the slow, jagged steps of dealing with grief. Unable to write, she first took refuge in endless knitting, then got a tattoo on Grace's sixth birthday. Hiding from the Beatles' songs her daughter had loved, she found them so ubiquitous that she could finally listen only to talk radio. Grace's little shoes stood sentinel at the top of the stairs and three years passed before Hood could bear to clean her room. But there is redemption at the end of this short, anguished book. Hood and her husband have a new daughter, Annabelle, adopted from China, and at last, Hood can celebrate Mother's Day, albeit with a 'strange mixture of grief and joy.'" Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review" by , "A loving tribute by turns harrowing and beautiful."
"Review" by , "I will most likely never again eat pasta with butter and Parmesan or cucumbers cut in perfect rounds...without thinking of Ann Hood and her daughter."
"Review" by , "Akin to Joan Didion's The Year of Magical Thinking, Comfort beautifully discovers images and details to describe [Hood's] agony."
"Synopsis" by , Ann Hood offers a moving and remarkable memoir about the sudden death of a daughter, surviving grief, and learning to love again.
"Synopsis" by , In 2002, Ann Hood's five-year-old daughter Grace died suddenly from a virulent form of strep throat. Stunned and devastated, the family searched for comfort in a time when none seemed possible. Hood--an accomplished novelist--was unable to read or write. She could only reflect on her lost daughter--"the way she looked splashing in the bathtub ... the way we sang 'Eight Days a Week.'" One day, a friend suggested she learn to knit. Knitting soothed her and gave her something to do. Eventually, she began to read and write again. A semblance of normalcy returned, but grief, in ever new and different forms, still held the family. What they could not know was that comfort would come, and in surprising ways. Hood traces her descent into grief and reveals how she found comfort and hope again--a journey to recovery that culminates with a newly adopted daughter.
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