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Flat Broke in the Free Market: How Globalization Fleeced Working People

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Flat Broke in the Free Market: How Globalization Fleeced Working People Cover

ISBN13: 9780393065077
ISBN10: 0393065073
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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Growing up in an African American working-class family in the Midwest, Jon Jeter watched the jobs undergirding a community disappear. As a journalist for the Washington Post (twice a Pulitzer Prize finalist), he reported on the freemarket reforms of the IMF and the World Bank, which in a single generation created a transnational underclass.

Led by the United States, nations around the world stopped making things and starting buying them, imbibing a risky cocktail of deindustrialization, privatization, and anti-inflationary monetary policy. Jeter gives the consequences of abstract economic policies a human face, and shows how our chickens are coming home to roost in the form of the subprime mortgage scandal, the food crisis, and the fraying of traditional social bonds (marriage). From Rio de Janeiro to Shanghai to Soweto to Chicago"s South Side and Washington, DC, Jeter shows us how the economic prescriptions of 'the Washington Consensus' have only deepened poverty '"while countries like Chile and Venezuela have flouted the conventional wisdom and prospered."

Review:

"In an eloquent, no-holds-barred indictment of globalization, Jeter, former Washington Post bureau chief for southern Africa, weaves the narratives of prostitutes in Buenos Aires and cab drivers in Brazil, tomato sellers in Zambia and an upwardly mobile black woman in Chicago into an analysis of how globalization and free trade have transformed many of the world's manufacturing hubs into 'global flea markets.' There are true moments of heartbreak, particularly when Jeter shows how globalization has slowed progress in postapartheid South Africa and mingles with racism in Brazil, where employers and the state target poor black women for forced sterilization for the putative sake of a larger work force. 'The ghetto is in its ascendancy,' he writes, challenging free trade orthodoxy and its ability to reduce poverty with examples of nations like Chile which have rethought their attitudes toward globalization and are moving toward new strength and independence. Jeter's stinging criticisms are a catalyst for a truthful and painful discussion about who a 'global economy' helps and who it destroys." Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

Flat Broke is a brilliant and much-needed assessment of how globalization, neoliberalism, the World Bank, IMF and the other tools of modern empire-building caused the current global economic crisis. And then Jeter goes deeper. He demonstrates that today's international resistance movements, led by a number of Latin American nations, offer hope for a future that will no longer exclude peasants, blue-collar workers, and the 3 billion people presently living below the poverty line — a sustainable and just future our children will want to inherit. John Perkins, New York Times bestselling author of Confessions of an Economic Hit Man

Synopsis:

A powerful, accessible, and eye-opening analysis of the global economy.

Synopsis:

A powerful, accessible, and eye-opening analysis of the global economy.

Synopsis:

Growing up in an African American working-class family in the Midwest, Jon Jeter watched the jobs undergirding a community disappear. As a journalist for the Washington Post (twice a Pulitzer Prize finalist), he reported on the freemarket reforms of the IMF and the World Bank, which in a single generation created a transnational underclass.

Led by the United States, nations around the world stopped making things and starting buying them, imbibing a risky cocktail of deindustrialization, privatization, and anti-inflationary monetary policy. Jeter gives the consequences of abstract economic policies a human face, and shows how our chickens are coming home to roost in the form of the subprime mortgage scandal, the food crisis, and the fraying of traditional social bonds (marriage). From Rio de Janeiro to Shanghai to Soweto to Chicago's South Side and Washington, DC, Jeter shows us how the economic prescriptions of "the Washington Consensus" have only deepened poverty--while countries like Chile and Venezuela have flouted the conventional wisdom and prospered.

About the Author

Jon Jeter was the Washington Post bureau chief for southern Africa from 1999 to 2003, and the Post's bureau chief for South America from 2003 to 2004. He now lives in Brooklyn.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

GeorgeMapp, August 21, 2009 (view all comments by GeorgeMapp)
This is an informative and insightful book. When you combine Jeter's narrative with that of Naomi Klein's "Shock Doctrine" and the book "How Corporations Rule the World," you understand what this world of "extreme capitalism" has come to.
George
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(1 of 1 readers found this comment helpful)

Product Details

ISBN:
9780393065077
Author:
Jeter, Jon
Publisher:
W. W. Norton & Company
Subject:
Globalization
Subject:
Economic Conditions
Subject:
Free trade
Subject:
Working class
Subject:
Globalization - Economic aspects
Subject:
Economic development -- Social aspects.
Subject:
Politics - General
Copyright:
Publication Date:
April 2009
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
256
Dimensions:
8.6 x 5.9 x 1 in 0.765 lb

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Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Economics » Global Economics
History and Social Science » Politics » General

Flat Broke in the Free Market: How Globalization Fleeced Working People New Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$23.95 In Stock
Product details 256 pages W. W. Norton & Company - English 9780393065077 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "In an eloquent, no-holds-barred indictment of globalization, Jeter, former Washington Post bureau chief for southern Africa, weaves the narratives of prostitutes in Buenos Aires and cab drivers in Brazil, tomato sellers in Zambia and an upwardly mobile black woman in Chicago into an analysis of how globalization and free trade have transformed many of the world's manufacturing hubs into 'global flea markets.' There are true moments of heartbreak, particularly when Jeter shows how globalization has slowed progress in postapartheid South Africa and mingles with racism in Brazil, where employers and the state target poor black women for forced sterilization for the putative sake of a larger work force. 'The ghetto is in its ascendancy,' he writes, challenging free trade orthodoxy and its ability to reduce poverty with examples of nations like Chile which have rethought their attitudes toward globalization and are moving toward new strength and independence. Jeter's stinging criticisms are a catalyst for a truthful and painful discussion about who a 'global economy' helps and who it destroys." Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review" by , Flat Broke is a brilliant and much-needed assessment of how globalization, neoliberalism, the World Bank, IMF and the other tools of modern empire-building caused the current global economic crisis. And then Jeter goes deeper. He demonstrates that today's international resistance movements, led by a number of Latin American nations, offer hope for a future that will no longer exclude peasants, blue-collar workers, and the 3 billion people presently living below the poverty line — a sustainable and just future our children will want to inherit.
"Synopsis" by , A powerful, accessible, and eye-opening analysis of the global economy.
"Synopsis" by , A powerful, accessible, and eye-opening analysis of the global economy.
"Synopsis" by , Growing up in an African American working-class family in the Midwest, Jon Jeter watched the jobs undergirding a community disappear. As a journalist for the Washington Post (twice a Pulitzer Prize finalist), he reported on the freemarket reforms of the IMF and the World Bank, which in a single generation created a transnational underclass.

Led by the United States, nations around the world stopped making things and starting buying them, imbibing a risky cocktail of deindustrialization, privatization, and anti-inflationary monetary policy. Jeter gives the consequences of abstract economic policies a human face, and shows how our chickens are coming home to roost in the form of the subprime mortgage scandal, the food crisis, and the fraying of traditional social bonds (marriage). From Rio de Janeiro to Shanghai to Soweto to Chicago's South Side and Washington, DC, Jeter shows us how the economic prescriptions of "the Washington Consensus" have only deepened poverty--while countries like Chile and Venezuela have flouted the conventional wisdom and prospered.

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