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Marching on Washington: The Forging of an American Political Tradition

Marching on Washington: The Forging of an American Political Tradition Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

When Jacob Coxey's army marched into Washington, D.C. in 1894, observers didn't know what to make of this concerted effort by citizens to use the capital for national public protest. By 1971, however, when thousands marched to protest the war in Vietnam, what had once been outside the political order had become a routine gesture in American political culture. Lucy G. Barber's lively, erudite history of marching on Washington explains how this political tactic began as something unacceptable and gradually became legitimate. Barber shows how these highly visible events contributed to the development of a broader and more inclusive view of American citizenship and transformed the capital from the exclusive domain of politicians and officials into a national stage for American citizens to participate directly in national politics.

Marching on Washington depicts in detail six demonstrations and the protest movements behind them, beginning with Coxey's Army in 1894 and including marches for woman suffrage, veterans' bonuses, and equal opportunity as well as the enormous March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom in 1963 and the antiwar protests in 1971. These depictions show how ambitious, skillful, and daring organizers challenged the government and claimed the capital as a political space where citizens could voice their concerns to their elected leaders. An epilogue explores marches in Washington since 1971.

On a broader level, Barber scrutinizes the strategic uses of American citizenship and the changing spatial politics of the capital. From this perspective, it is a story not only about the power of American citizens but also about the shifting terrain of citizenship. At the same time, the history of marching on Washington is a story of spaces lost and of spaces won. It is a fascinating account of how citizens project their plans and demands on national government, how they build support for their causes, and how they act out their own visions of national politics.

Synopsis:

How one of our most cherished political traditions--marching on the National Mall in Washington, D.C.--was transformed from a potentially dangerous curiousity in the 19th century to a dramatic yet conventional way for ordinary people to make direct demands on their government.


Synopsis:

"Marching on Washington is beautifully written. Lucy G. Barber has taken different stories and woven them together so that each story builds into a larger narrative about the history of political protest. By looking across a series of marches, Barber explores issues that escape more focused studies, such as the development of marching on Washington as a political strategy, and the changing conception of Washington as a public space. The scope of the research and the author's craft in telling these stories sheds new light on important moments in American history."—Mary L. Dudziak, author of Cold War Civil Rights: Race and the Image of American Democracy

Synopsis:

Includes bibliographical references (p. 229-295) and index.

About the Author

Lucy G. Barber is Director for Technology Initiatives, National Historical Publications and Records Commission, National Archives. She has taught United States history at the University of California, Davis; Rhode Island School of Design; and Brown University.

Table of Contents

List of Illustrations

Preface

Introduction

1. "Without Precedent": Coxeys Army

Invades Washington, 1894

2. A "National" Demonstration: The Woman Suffrage Procession

and Pageant, March 3, 1913

3. "A New Type of Lobbying":

The Veterans Bonus March of 1932

4. "Pressure, More Pressure, and Still More Pressure":

The Negro March on Washington and

Its Cancellation, 1941

5. "In the Great Tradition": The March on Washington

for Jobs and Freedom, August 28, 1963

6. The "Spring Offensive" of 1971:

Radicals and Marches on Washington

Epilogue

Notes

Bibliographical Essay

Acknowledgments

Index

Product Details

ISBN:
9780520227132
Subtitle:
The Forging of an American Political Tradition
Author:
Barber, Lucy G.
Publisher:
University of California Press
Location:
Berkeley
Subject:
General
Subject:
History
Subject:
United states
Subject:
Practical Politics
Subject:
Political participation
Subject:
Political culture
Subject:
Social movements
Subject:
Civil rights movements
Subject:
Demonstrations
Subject:
Washington
Subject:
Mall, The
Subject:
United States - State & Local - General
Subject:
History & Theory - General
Subject:
Political Process - General
Subject:
United States - General
Edition Description:
Trade Cloth
Series Volume:
v. 34
Publication Date:
20030123
Binding:
Hardback
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
33 b/w photographs, 4 maps
Pages:
337
Dimensions:
9 x 6 x 0.88 in 1.07 lb

Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Americana » General

Marching on Washington: The Forging of an American Political Tradition
0 stars - 0 reviews
$ In Stock
Product details 337 pages University of California Press - English 9780520227132 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , How one of our most cherished political traditions--marching on the National Mall in Washington, D.C.--was transformed from a potentially dangerous curiousity in the 19th century to a dramatic yet conventional way for ordinary people to make direct demands on their government.


"Synopsis" by ,
"Marching on Washington is beautifully written. Lucy G. Barber has taken different stories and woven them together so that each story builds into a larger narrative about the history of political protest. By looking across a series of marches, Barber explores issues that escape more focused studies, such as the development of marching on Washington as a political strategy, and the changing conception of Washington as a public space. The scope of the research and the author's craft in telling these stories sheds new light on important moments in American history."—Mary L. Dudziak, author of Cold War Civil Rights: Race and the Image of American Democracy
"Synopsis" by , Includes bibliographical references (p. 229-295) and index.
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