Nonficionado Sale
 
 

Special Offers see all

Enter to WIN a $100 Credit

Subscribe to PowellsBooks.news
for a chance to win.
Privacy Policy

Visit our stores


    Recently Viewed clear list


    Book News | May 11, 2015

    Chris Hedges: IMG Powell’s Q&A: Chris Hedges



    Describe your latest book. Wages of Rebellion looks at the nature of rebellion, those who do it, why they do it, and the price they pay for being a... Continue »
    1. $18.89 Sale Hardcover add to wish list

      Wages of Rebellion

      Chris Hedges 9781568589664

    spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$8.95
List price: $28.00
Used Hardcover
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
Qty Store Section
3 Hawthorne US History- 19th Century

The Devil in the White City: Murder, Magic, and Madness at the Fair That Changed America

by

The Devil in the White City: Murder, Magic, and Madness at the Fair That Changed America Cover

ISBN13: 9780609608449
ISBN10: 0609608444
Condition: Standard
Dustjacket: Standard
All Product Details

Only 3 left in stock at $8.95!

 

 

Excerpt

The Black City

How easy it was to disappear:

A thousand trains a day entered or left Chicago. Many of these trains brought single young women who had never even seen a city but now hoped to make one of the biggest and toughest their home. Jane Addams, the urban reformer who founded Chicago's Hull House, wrote, "Never before in civilization have such numbers of young girls been suddenly released from the protection of the home and permitted to walk unattended upon the city streets and to work under alien roofs." The women sought work as typewriters, stenographers, seamstresses, and weavers. The men who hired them were for the most part moral citizens intent on efficiency and profit. But not always. On March 30, 1890, an officer of the First National Bank placed a warning in the help-wanted section of the Chicago Tribune, to inform female stenographers of "our growing conviction that no thoroughly honorable business-man who is this side of dotage ever advertises for a lady stenographer who is a blonde, is good-looking, is quite alone in the city, or will transmit her photograph. All such advertisements upon their face bear the marks of vulgarity, nor do we regard it safe for any lady to answer such unseemly utterances."

The women walked to work on streets that angled past bars, gambling houses, and bordellos. Vice thrived, with official indulgence. "The parlors and bedrooms in which honest folk lived were (as now) rather dull places," wrote Ben Hecht, late in his life, trying to explain this persistent trait of old Chicago. "It was pleasant, in a way, to know that outside their windows, the devil was still capering in a flare of brimstone." In an analogy that would prove all too apt, Max Weber likened the city to "a human being with his skin removed."

Anonymous death came early and often. Each of the thousand trains that entered and left the city did so at grade level. You could step from a curb and be killed by the Chicago Limited. Every day on average two people were destroyed at the city's rail crossings. Their injuries were grotesque. Pedestrians retrieved severed heads. There were other hazards. Streetcars fell from drawbridges. Horses bolted and dragged carriages into crowds. Fires took a dozen lives a day. In describing the fire dead, the term the newspapers most liked to use was "roasted." There was diphtheria, typhus, cholera, influenza. And there was murder. In the time of the fair the rate at which men and women killed each other rose sharply throughout the nation but especially in Chicago, where police found themselves without the manpower or expertise to manage the volume. In the first six months of 1892 the city experienced nearly eight hundred homicides. Four a day. Most were prosaic, arising from robbery, argument, or sexual jealousy. Men shot women, women shot men, and children shot each other by accident. But all this could be understood. Nothing like the Whitechapel killings had occurred. Jack the Ripper's five-murder spree in 1888 had defied explanation and captivated readers throughout America, who believed such a thing could not happen in their own hometowns.

But things were changing. Everywhere one looked the boundary between the moral and the wicked seemed to be degrading. Elizabeth Cady Stanton argued in favor of divorce. Clarence Darrow advocated free love. A young woman named Borden killed her parents.

And in Chicago a young handsome doctor stepped from a train, his surgical valise in hand. He entered a world of clamor, smoke, and steam, refulgent with the scents of murdered cattle and pigs. He found it to his liking.

The letters came later, from the Cigrands, Williamses, Smythes, and untold others, addressed to that strange gloomy castle at Sixty-third and Wallace, pleading for the whereabouts of daughters and daughters' children.

It was so easy to disappear, so easy to deny knowledge, so very easy in the smoke and din to mask that something dark had taken root.

This was Chicago, on the eve of the greatest fair in history.

Copyright © 2003 by Erik Larson

What Our Readers Are Saying

Add a comment for a chance to win!
Average customer rating based on 4 comments:

Judy Riggs, January 23, 2012 (view all comments by Judy Riggs)
Absolutely fascinating read - a magical fair, a serial killer, hordes of famous people, tragedy, triumph - Erik Larson did a masterful job!
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(1 of 2 readers found this comment helpful)
misszombie22, April 26, 2007 (view all comments by misszombie22)
i like how he explianed how the fair would become to other as in only poe could dream of such an event that is about to happen. its aslo very interesting.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(6 of 15 readers found this comment helpful)
TanithFirst&Only, August 12, 2006 (view all comments by TanithFirst&Only)
As much as I wanted to like the book, I found it immensly plodding and highly differing towards unneccessary plot. With that, I feel the need to let other people know before they spend more than the book deserves.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(13 of 29 readers found this comment helpful)
View all 4 comments

Product Details

ISBN:
9780609608449
Author:
Larson, Erik
Publisher:
Crown Publishing Group (NY)
Author:
Schechter, Harold
Location:
New York
Subject:
Murder
Subject:
United States - 20th Century
Subject:
United States - 19th Century/Turn of the Century
Subject:
Serial murders
Subject:
Serial murderers
Subject:
United States - State & Local - General
Subject:
Murder - General
Subject:
United States - State & Local - Midwest
Subject:
Murder - Serial Killers
Subject:
History
Subject:
Architects
Subject:
Serial murders - Illinois - Chicago
Subject:
Chicago (Ill.) - History - 19th century
Subject:
United States - 19th Century
Subject:
World History-General
Subject:
history;chicago;non-fiction;true crime;architecture;murder;crime;serial killer;world s fair;mystery;fiction;19th century;chicago world s fair;american history;historical fiction;historical;biography;illinois;american;america;thriller;daniel burnham;1890s;
Subject:
Pathological Psychology
Copyright:
Edition Number:
1st ed.
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Series:
Illinois
Series Volume:
GTR-547
Publication Date:
February 2003
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
1 MAP, 7 BandW PHOTOS
Pages:
368
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in 1.26 lb

Other books you might like

  1. Isaac's Storm: A Man, a Time, and...
    Used Trade Paper $5.50
  2. Jarhead: A Marine's Chronicle of the... Used Trade Paper $2.95
  3. Krakatoa: The Day the World... Used Trade Paper $5.21
  4. The World's Columbian Exposition:... Used Trade Paper $15.50
  5. Under the Banner of Heaven: A Story...
    Used Trade Paper $6.95
  6. The Chicago World's Fair of 1893: A... Used Trade Paper $8.50

Related Subjects


History and Social Science » Americana » General
History and Social Science » Americana » Midwest
History and Social Science » Crime » General
History and Social Science » Crime » True Crime
History and Social Science » US History » 19th Century
History and Social Science » World History » General

The Devil in the White City: Murder, Magic, and Madness at the Fair That Changed America Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$8.95 In Stock
Product details 368 pages Crown Publishing Group (NY) - English 9780609608449 Reviews:
"Staff Pick" by ,

An amazing history that recounts the inconceivable events surrounding the Chicago World's Fair in 1893, Larson's tale captures a time and place that vividly come to life. The central characters in this tale are Daniel H. Burnham, the architect responsible for the construction of the fair, and H. H. Holmes, a serial killer who used the popularity of the fair for his own nefarious ends. Burnham's work at overcoming the insurmountable obstacles before completing this awe inspiring project is interwoven with chapters relating to the maniacal Holmes, whose person will keep you both captivated and haunted. Breathtakingly written, this almost unbelievable history reads like the work of a highly inventive novelist.

"Staff Pick" by ,

"I was mesmerized by this book. It was a deliciously creepy read, made more creepy for being true. Several times in the course of reading it, I had to keep reminding myself that the events really happened."

"Review A Day" by , "You've got to respect a book that makes you keep flipping to the back cover, double-checking that it is nonfiction. Erik Larson's The Devil in the White City seems like something from the mind of, say, Thomas Harris. But it is, in fact, true. A gruesome and gripping book....[T]he heart of the story is so good, you find yourself asking how you could not know this already." (read the entire Esquire review)
"Review" by , "Engrossing...exceedingly well documented...utterly fascinating."
"Review" by , "Another successful exploration of American history....Larson skillfully balances the grisly details with the far-reaching implications of the World's Fair."
"Review" by , "Vivid history of the glittering Chicago World?s Fair and its dark side."
"Synopsis" by , A riveting account of a gruesome triple-homicide at Beekman Place in Depression Era New York, with an intriguing cast of characters including the brilliant but mentally-disturbed sculptor, Robert Irwin.
"Synopsis" by , Includes bibliographical references (p. [423]-429) and index.
"Synopsis" by , Two men, each handsome and unusually adept at his chosen work, embodied an element of the great dynamic that characterized Americas rush toward the twentieth century. The architect was Daniel Hudson Burnham, the fairs brilliant director of works and the builder of many of the countrys most important structures, including the Flatiron Building in New York and Union Station in Washington, D.C. The murderer was Henry H. Holmes, a young doctor who, in a malign parody of the White City, built his “Worlds Fair Hotel” just west of the fairgrounds—a torture palace complete with dissection table, gas chamber, and 3,000-degree crematorium. Burnham overcame tremendous obstacles and tragedies as he organized the talents of Frederick Law Olmsted, Charles McKim, Louis Sullivan, and others to transform swampy Jackson Park into the White City, while Holmes used the attraction of the great fair and his own satanic charms to lure scores of young women to their deaths. What makes the story all the more chilling is that Holmes really lived, walking the grounds of that dream city by the lake.

The Devil in the White City draws the reader into a time of magic and majesty, made all the more appealing by a supporting cast of real-life characters, including Buffalo Bill, Theodore Dreiser, Susan B. Anthony, Thomas Edison, Archduke Francis Ferdinand, and others. In this book the smoke, romance, and mystery of the Gilded Age come alive as never before.

Erik Larsons gifts as a storyteller are magnificently displayed in this rich narrative of the master builder, the killer, and the great fair that obsessed them both.

To find out more about this book, go to http://www.DevilInTheWhiteCity.com.

spacer
spacer
  • back to top

FOLLOW US ON...

     
Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.