Wintersalen Sale
 
 

Special Offers see all

Enter to WIN a $100 Credit

Subscribe to PowellsBooks.news
for a chance to win.
Privacy Policy

Tour our stores


    Recently Viewed clear list


    Original Essays | November 7, 2014

    Carli Davidson: IMG Puppies for Sale? Read This First



    Shake Puppies contains an almost unsettling amount of cuteness. There is a good chance after looking through its pages you will get puppy fever and... Continue »
    1. $12.59 Sale Hardcover add to wish list

      Shake Puppies

      Carli Davidson 9780062351722

    spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$5.95
List price: $16.99
Used Hardcover
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
Qty Store Section
1 Local Warehouse Children's Young Adult- General

Stargirl

by

Stargirl Cover

ISBN13: 9780679886372
ISBN10: 0679886370
Condition: Standard
Dustjacket: Standard
All Product Details

Only 1 left in stock at $5.95!

 

 

Excerpt

When I was little, my Uncle Pete had a necktie with a porcupine painted on it.  I though that necktie was just about the neatest thing in the world.  Uncle Pete would stand patiently before me while I ran my fingers over the silky surface, half expecting to be stuck by one of the quills.  Once, he let me wear it.  I kept looking for one of my own, but I could never find one.

I was twelve when we moved from Pennsylvania to Arizona.  When Uncle Pete came to say goodbye, he was wearing the tie.  I though he did so to give me one last look at it, and I was grateful.  But then, with a dramatic flourish, he whipped off the tie and draped it around my neck.  "It's yours," he said.  "Going-away present."

I loved that porcupine tie so much that I decided to start a collection.  Two years after we settled in Arizona, the number of ties in my collection was still one.  Where do you find a porcupine necktie in Mica, Arizona - or anywhere else, for that matter?

On my fourteenth birthday, I read about myself in the local newspaper.  The family section ran a regular feature about kids on their birthdays, and my mother had called in some info.  The last sentence read: "As a hobby, Leo Borlock collects porcupine neckties."

Several days later, coming home from school, I found a plastic bag on our front step.  Inside was a gift-wrapped package tied with yellow ribbon.  The tag said, "Happy Birthday!"  I opened the package.  It was a porcupine necktie.  Two porcupines were tossing darts with their quills, while a third was picking its teeth.

I inspected the box, the tag, the paper.  Nowhere could I find the giver's name.  I asked my parents. I asked my friends.  I called my Uncle Pete.  Everyone denied knowing anything about it.

At the time I simply considered the episode a mystery.  It did not occur to me that was being watched.  We were all being watched.

"Did you see her?"

That was the first thing Kevin said to me on the first day of school, eleventh grade. We were waiting for the bell to ring.

"See who?" I said.

"Hah!" He craned his neck, scanning the mob. He had witnessed something remarkable; it showed on his face. He grinned, still scanning. "You'll know."

There were hundreds of us, milling about, calling names, pointing to summer-tanned faces we hadn't seen since June. Our interest in each other was never keener than during the fifteen minutes before the first bell of the first day.

I punched his arm. "Who?"

The bell rang. We poured inside.

I heard it again in homeroom, a whispered voice behind me as we said the Pledge of Allegiance.

"You see her?"

I heard it in the hallways. I heard it in English and Geometry:

"Did you see her?"

Who could it be? A new student? A spectacular blonde from California? Or from back East, where many of us came from? Or one of those summer makeovers, someone who leaves in June looking like a little girl and returns in September as a full-bodied woman, a ten-week miracle?

And then in Earth Sciences I heard a name: "Stargirl."

I turned to the senior slouched behind me. "Stargirl?" I said. "What kind of name is that?"

"That's it. Stargirl Caraway. She said it in homeroom."

"Stargirl?"

"Yeah."

And then I saw her. At lunch. She wore an off-white dress so long it covered her shoes. It had ruffles around the neck and cuffs and looked like it could have been her great-grandmother's wedding gown. Her hair was the color of sand. IT fell to her shoulders. Something was strapped across her back, but it wasn't a book bag. At first I thought it was a miniature guitar. I found out later it was a ukulele.

She did not carry a lunch tray. She did carry a large canvas bag with a life-size sunflower painted on it. The lunchroom was dead silent as she walked by. She stopped at an empty table, laid down her bag, slung the instrument strap over he chair, and sat down. She pulled a sandwich from the bag and started to eat.

Half the lunchroom kept staring, half starting buzzing.

Kevin was grinning. "Wha'd I tell you?"

I nodded.

"She's in tenth grade," he said. "I hear she's been homeschooled till now."

"Maybe that explains it," I said.

Her back was to us, so I couldn't see her face. No one sat with her, but at the tables next to hers kids were cramming two to a seat. She didn't seem to notice. She seemed marooned in a sea of staring buzzing faces.

Kevin was grinning again. "You thinking what I'm thinking?" he said.

I grinned back. I nodded. "Hot Seat."

Hot Seat was our in-school TV show. We had started it the year before. I was producer/director, Kevin was on-camera host. Each month he interviewed a student. So far most of them had been honor student types, athletes, model citizens. Noteworthy in the usual ways, but not especially interesting.

Suddenly Kevin's eyes boggled. The girl was picking up her ukulele. And now she was strumming it. And now she was singing! Strumming away, bobbing her head and shoulders, singing "I'm looking over a four-leaf clover that I over-looked before." Stone silence all around. Then came the sound of a single person clapping. I looked. It was the lunch-line cashier.

And now the girl was standing, slinging her bag over one shoulder and marching among the tables, strumming and singing and strutting and twirling. Head swung, eyes followed her, mouths hung open. Disbelief. When she came by our table, I got my first good look at her face. She wasn't gorgeous, wasn't ugly. A sprinkle of freckles crossed the bridge of her nose. Mostly she looked like a hundred other girls in school, except for two things. She wore no makeup, and her eyes were the biggest I had ever seen, like deer's eyes caught in headlights. She twirled as she went past, he flaring skirt brushing my pantleg, and then she marched out of the lunchroom.

From among the tables came three slow claps. Someone whistled. Someone yelped.

Kevin and I gawked at each other.

Kevin held up his hands and framed a marquee in the air. "Hot Seat! Coming Attraction - Stargirl!"

I slapped the table. "Yes!"

We slammed hands.

What Our Readers Are Saying

Add a comment for a chance to win!
Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

caulfield_saves, March 30, 2009 (view all comments by caulfield_saves)
it has been some time since ive read this book, but i have to say, stargirl changed me. she is so sweet, and now, after reading this book, i think about my everyday actions, i actually find myself leaving coins on the ground for toddlers. this is a must read.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(1 of 5 readers found this comment helpful)

Product Details

ISBN:
9780679886372
Author:
Spinelli, Jerry
Publisher:
Alfred A. Knopf
Author:
Sloan, Holly Goldberg
Author:
Graff, Lisa
Location:
New York
Subject:
Children's fiction
Subject:
Children's 12-Up - Fiction - General
Subject:
Social Situations - General
Subject:
Social Situations - Adolescence
Subject:
Schools
Subject:
Girls
Subject:
School & Education
Subject:
High schools
Subject:
Social Issues - General
Subject:
Individuality
Subject:
Situations / Adolescence
Subject:
General Juvenile Fiction
Subject:
Children s-General
Subject:
Family - Parents
Subject:
Situations / Friendship
Subject:
regret, baseball, hockey, redemption, scar, brothers, family, hope, pranks, friendship, divorce, anger
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Series Volume:
6
Publication Date:
20000831
Binding:
Paperback
Grade Level:
from 7
Language:
English
Pages:
304
Dimensions:
8.25 x 5.5 in 1 lb
Age Level:
12-17

Other books you might like

  1. Tangerine Used Trade Paper $3.50
  2. Before I Go Used Hardcover $5.95
  3. The Chicken Dance New Trade Paper $12.88
  4. Do the Math: Secrets, Lies, and Algebra
    Used Hardcover $2.95
  5. Monster
    Used Trade Paper $4.95
  6. Speak
    Used Book Club Paperback $2.95

Related Subjects

Children's » General
Children's » Situations » General
Young Adult » Fiction » Social Issues » Adolescence
Young Adult » Fiction » Social Issues » Peer Pressure
Young Adult » General

Stargirl Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$5.95 In Stock
Product details 304 pages Alfred A. Knopf - English 9780679886372 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Spinelli poses searching questions about loyalty to one's friends and oneself and leaves readers to form their own answers." Publishers Weekly
"Review A Day" by , "Stargirl...solidifies Spinelli's ability to view the world through the lens of a child and weave his observations into a profoundly enriching and thought-provoking novel." (read the entire Powells.com review)
"Review" by , "Once again Spinelli takes his readers on a journey where choices between the self and the group must be made, and he is wise enough to show how hard they are, even when sweet."
"Review" by , "[A] poetic allegorical tale about the magnificence and rarity of true nonconformity."
"Review" by , "With the book's high school setting and situations, this entertaining and thought-provoking story will appeal to and be enjoyed by junior high and high school readers."
"Synopsis" by , Stargirl is a true celebration of nonconformity.

This oftentimes tense and emotional story explores the fleeting, cruel nature of popularity — and the thrill and inspiration of first love. The questions, discussion topics, and author information that follow are intended to guide readers and spark discussion as they begin to analyze the larger emotional, sociological, and literary elements of this exceptional and thought-provoking novel.

"Synopsis" by ,
From the author of A Tangle of Knots and Absolutely Almost, a touching story about a boy who won't let one tragic accident define him.

Everyone says that middle school is awful, but Trent knows nothing could be worse than the year he had in fifth grade, when a freak accident on Cedar Lake left one kid dead, and Trent with a brain full of terrible thoughts he can't get rid of. Trents pretty positive the entire disaster was his fault, so for him middle school feels like a fresh start, a chance to prove to everyone that he's not the horrible screw-up they seem to think he is. 

If only Trent could make that fresh start happen.

It isnt until Trent gets caught up in the whirlwind that is Fallon Little—the girl with the mysterious scar across her face—that things begin to change. Because fresh starts arent always easy. Even in baseball, when a fly ball gets lost in the sun, you have to remember to shift your position to find it.

Advance praise for Lost in the Sun:

 

“In Lost in the Sun, Trent decides that he will speak the truth: that pain and anger and loss are not the final words, that goodness can find us after all—even when we hide from it.  This is a novel that speaks powerfully, honestly, almost shockingly about our human pain and our human redemption.  This book will change you.”—Gary Schmidt, two-time Newbery Honor-winning author of The Wednesday Wars and Lizzie Bright and the Buckminster Boy

 

“Lisa Graff crafts a compelling story about a boy touched with tragedy and the world of people he cares about.  And like all the best stories, it ends at a new beginning.”—Richard Peck, Newbery Award-winning author of A Year Down Yonder and Long Way From Chicago

 

 

Lisa Graff's Awards and Reviews:

 

Lisa Graff's books have been named to 30 state award lists, and A Tangle of Knots was long-listed for the National Book Award.

Praise for Absolutely Almost:

* "Albie comes through significant emotional hardship to a genuine sense of self-worth."--School Library Journal  *STARRED*

* "A perfect book to share with struggling readers."--Booklist  *STARRED*

* "Achingly superb, Albies story shines."--Kirkus Reviews  *STARRED*

* "Graffs...gentle story invokes evergreen themes of coming to appreciate ones strengths (and weaknesses), and stands out for its thoughtful, moving portrait of a boy who learns to keep moving forward, taking on the world at his own speed."--Publishers Weekly  *STARRED*

  

Praise for A Tangle of Knots:

"[A] blithe magical puzzle."--Meghan Cox Gurdon, The Wall Street Journal

"Lisa Graff has created a beautiful world of deliciously interconnected stories that draw you in."--Abby West, Entertainment Weekly [A-]

* "Subtle and intricate, rich with humor and insight, this quietly magical adventure delights."--Kirkus Reviews  *STARRED*

* "Combining the literary sensibility of E. B. White with the insouciance of Louis Sachar, Graff has written a tangle that should satisfy readers for years to come."--Booklist  *STARRED*

 

"Synopsis" by ,
In the tradition of Out of My Mind, Wonder, and Mockingbird, this is an intensely moving middle grade novel about being an outsider, coping with loss, and discovering the true meaning of family.

Willow Chance is a twelve-year-old genius, obsessed with nature and diagnosing medical conditions, who finds it comforting to count by 7s. It has never been easy for her to connect with anyone other than her adoptive parents, but that hasnt kept her from leading a quietly happy life . . . until now.

 

Suddenly Willows world is tragically changed when her parents both die in a car crash, leaving her alone in a baffling world. The triumph of this book is that it is not a tragedy. This extraordinarily odd, but extraordinarily endearing, girl manages to push through her grief. Her journey to find a fascinatingly diverse and fully believable surrogate family is a joy and a revelation to read.

“Holly Goldberg Sloan writes about belonging in a way Ive never quite seen in any other book. This is a gorgeous, funny, and heartwarming novel that Ill never forget.”—John Corey Whaley, author of Where Things Come Back

"Willow Chance subtly drew me into her head and her life, so much so that I was holding my breath for her by the end. Holly Goldberg Sloan has created distinct characters who will stay with you long after you finish the book."—Sharon Creech, Newbery Award-winning author of Walk Two Moons

"In achingly beautiful prose, Holly Goldberg Sloan has written a delightful tale of transformation thats a celebration of life in all its wondrous, hilarious and confounding glory. Counting by 7s is a triumph."—Maria Semple, author of Whered You Go, Bernadette

 

 

spacer
spacer
  • back to top

FOLLOW US ON...

     
Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.