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8 Local Warehouse Literature- A to Z

A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius

by

A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius Cover

ISBN13: 9780684863474
ISBN10: 0684863472
Condition: Standard
Dustjacket: Standard
All Product Details

 

 

Reading Group Guide

1. The material preceding the main text in this book--called "front matter" in the publishing business--has been entirely taken over by the author, including the usually very official copyright page. Why might the publisher have allowed Eggers to take this unconventional route? Why does Eggers work so extensively at disrupting the formality of publication and his status as an author?

2. On the copyright page we find the statement, "This is a work of fiction"; and at the beginning of the preface Eggers writes, "This is not, actually, a work of pure nonfiction." What point is Eggers making by casting all these doubts on the veracity of the book's contents? In his discussion about the current popularity of memoirs [pp. xxiÐxxiii], Eggers admits that the book is a memoir but encourages his readers to think of it as fiction. What is the difference, in a work of literature, between fact and fiction, and does it matter?

3. In the remarkable acknowledgments section, which is a brilliant critique and discussion of the book as a whole, Eggers points out that "the success of a memoir . . . has a lot to do with how appealing its narrator is" [p. xxvii]. What is appealing about Eggers as a narrator?

4. Eggers notes that the first major theme of the book is "The Unspoken Magic of Parental Disappearance" [p. xxviii]. It is a psychological truism that most children occasionally fantasize about being orphans, because parents often stand in the way of their children's desires. Along these lines, Eggers admits that the loss of his parents is "accompanied by an undeniable but then of course guilt-inducing sense of mobility, of infinite possibility" [p. xxix]. Does he ever find a way to resolve his conflicting emotions of grief and guilt?

5. If it is true, as Eggers points out, that he is not the first person whose parents died or who was left with the care of a sibling, what makes his story unique?

6. Eggers worries that because he is neither a woman nor a neat, well-organized person [pp. 81, 99], people assume that he can't take care of Toph. Which aspects of Eggers' parenting are most admirable? Which are most comic? What are the benefits and drawbacks of each aspect?

7. How do Eggers' memories of his father compare to those about his mother? To what degree are his feelings about his parents resolved, or at least assuaged, through the act of writing this book?

8. Much of the central part of the book relates to the business of launching and producing Might magazine. What does this section reveal about the concerns, desires, and frustrations of thoughtful, energetic twenty-somethings in contemporary America?

9. Eggers expresses ambivalence about having written this book because he feels guilty about exploiting his family's misfortune and exposing a private matter to the public. Among the epigraphs that Eggers considered, and then didn't use, for the book are "Why not just write what happened?" (R. Lowell) and "Ooh, look at me, I'm Dave, I'm writing a book! With all my thoughts in it! La la la!" (Christopher Eggers) [p. xvii]. How do these two epigraphs crystallize the memoir writer's dilemma?

10. Why does Eggers judge himself so harshly for returning to the family's old house in Lake Forest and for trying to retrieve his mother's ashes? Does the trip provide him and his story with a sense of closure, or just the opposite? Is there a central revelation to Eggers' narrative, a strong sense of change or a significant development? Or would you say, on the contrary, that the book has the haphazardness and lack of structure that we find in real life?

11. Eggers refers, half-jokingly, half-seriously, to himself and Toph as "God's tragic envoys" [p. 73]. Is it true, as Eggers suggests, that tragic occurrences give those to whom they happen the feeling of having been singled out for a special destiny? Is it common among those who have suffered intensely to expect some sort of recompense?

12. Recurring throughout the interview for MTV's The Real World [chapter VI] is the image of what Eggers calls "the lattice." What does he mean by this, and does it amount to a kind of spiritual belief on his part?

13. Mary Park, writing for Amazon.com, notes that "Eggers comes from the most media-saturated generation in history--so much so that he can't feel an emotion without the sense that it's already been felt for him. . . . Oddly enough, the effect is one of complete sincerity." How does Eggers manage to turn his generation's burdens of self-consciousness into strengths? What are the qualities that make his writing so vivid and memorable?

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 6 comments:

Josh Levine, January 4, 2010 (view all comments by Josh Levine)
One of the best books I've ever read.
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(1 of 2 readers found this comment helpful)
LadyKit, January 4, 2010 (view all comments by LadyKit)
People tend to either love or hate this book, and I am in the latter category. This book is breathtakingly beautiful, the tongue-in-cheek title is surprisingly accurate. At once hilarious and tragic, this is such a fine piece of literature.
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(1 of 4 readers found this comment helpful)
Jackie Sanders, January 1, 2010 (view all comments by Jackie Sanders)
My pick for best book of the decade is A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius by Dave Eggers. It was unique, funny and yes, heartbreaking. Loved it!
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(1 of 2 readers found this comment helpful)
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Product Details

ISBN:
9780684863474
Subtitle:
A Memoir Based on a True Story
Author:
Unknown, Unknown
Publisher:
Simon & Schuster
Location:
New York :
Subject:
Literary
Subject:
Fiction
Subject:
Historical - U.S.
Subject:
United States - 20th Century
Subject:
Death
Subject:
Brothers
Subject:
Journalists
Subject:
Family/Interpersonal Memoir
Subject:
Parents
Subject:
Domestic fiction
Subject:
Bildungsromane.
Subject:
Personal Memoirs
Subject:
Editors, Journalists, Publishers
Subject:
General Biography
Copyright:
Series Volume:
97-484-C
Publication Date:
20000217
Binding:
Hardback
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Yes
Pages:
416
Dimensions:
9.52x6.42x1.28 in. 1.61 lbs.

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Related Subjects


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A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$5.50 In Stock
Product details 416 pages Simon & Schuster - English 9780684863474 Reviews:
"Review" by , "Eggers evokes the terrible beauty of youth like a young Bob Dylan, frothing with furious anger....A comic and moving witness that transcends and transgresses formal boundaries."
"Review" by , "A brave work, and not a little heartbreaking."
"Review" by , "Eggers unfailingly captures the reader with gorgeous conviction."
"Review" by , "A virtuosic piece of writing, a big, daring, manic-depressive stew of a book that noisily announces the debut of a talented — yes, staggeringly talented — new writer."
"Review" by , "Scathingly perceptive and hysterically funny....Eggers reveals a true, and truly broken, heart."
"Review" by , "Eggers crafts something universal here, something raw and real and wonderful that transcends any zeitgeist and manages to deal trenchantly with 'big issues' that often prove too daunting for younger writers: mortality, youth, the artifice of writing, the Zen of Frisbee. This is laugh-out-loud funny and utterly unforgettable."
"Review" by , "It's James Joyce, back from the dead!....And he's got some Proust in him, the little 29-year-old-jerk, he's got the trammeling thoroughness of Proust's observation, his honest observations of artifice. The book is fine and different for earnest reasons, too....How generous of him to write this for us, to reveal all this so fearlessly, like Joyce, like Proust." Susan Salter Reynolds, Los Angeles Times Book Review, 01/30/2000* --
"Synopsis" by , One of the most mesmerizing memoirs of the literary season: a wrenching, hilarious, and stylistically groundbreaking story of a college senior who, in the space of five weeks, loses both of his parents to cancer and inherits his eight-year-old brother.
"Synopsis" by , The literary sensation of the year, a book that redefines both family and narrative for the twenty-first century. A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius is the moving memoir of a college senior who, in the space of five weeks, loses both of his parents to cancer and inherits his eight-year-old brother. Here is an exhilarating debut that manages to be simultaneously hilarious and wildly inventive as well as a deeply heartfelt story of the love that holds a family together.

A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius is an instant classic that will be read in paperback for decades to come. The Vintage edition includes a new appendix by the author.

"Synopsis" by , "I think this book is kind of malleable. I've never really wanted to put it away and be done with it forever — the second I first 'finished' it, I wanted to dig back in and change everything around. So I'm looking forward to getting back into the text, and straightening and focusing and deleting. Most of all, I'm thrilled that Vintage will be letting me include all the cool chase scenes, previously censored." — Dave Eggers

The literary sensation of the year, a book that redefines both family and narrative for the twenty-first century. A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius is the moving memoir of a college senior who, in the space of five weeks, loses both of his parents to cancer and inherits his seven-year-old brother. Here is an exhilarating debut that manages to be simultaneously hilarious and wildly inventive as well as a deeply heartfelt story of the love that holds a family together.

A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius is an instant classic that will be read in paperback for decades to come.

PAPERBACK EDITION — 15% MORE STAGGERING - Eggers has written 15,000 additional words for the Vintage Canada edition, including an entirely new appendix.

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