Murakami Sale
 
 

Recently Viewed clear list


Original Essays | August 21, 2014

Richard Bausch: IMG Why Literature Can Save Us



Our title is, of course, a problem. "Why Literature Can Save Us." And of course the problem is one of definition: what those words mean. What is... Continue »
  1. $18.87 Sale Hardcover add to wish list

    Before, During, After

    Richard Bausch 9780307266262

spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$18.75
New Hardcover
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
available for shipping or prepaid pickup only
Available for In-store Pickup
in 7 to 12 days
Qty Store Section
2 Remote Warehouse Travel Writing- General

I Myself Have Seen It (National Geographic Directions)

by

I Myself Have Seen It (National Geographic Directions) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

The oldest of the Hawaiian islands, Kauai is remarkably unchanged. It is the only island from which the others are not visible, except for tiny, privately owned Niihau. With a population of only 5,000 people, Kauai retains a 19th-century ruralism, managing to accommodate the "mainland" world without losing its mystery and beauty. As a child, Susanna Moore spent her school holidays on Kauai, and it is there she returns to find the elusive heart of Hawaii.

"I am interested in what might be called the written and unwritten songs of Hawaii, as they are found not only in oral tradition, but in myth, poetry, music, and the landscape itself.... The myths were strong, and they are still present — sometimes hidden, sometimes less evident to an unaccustomed eye, " Moore writes. In the breathtaking landscape of Kauai, she discovers that the old, unwritten songs of Polynesia have survived despite the onslaught of missionaries in the early 18th century, the establishment of Hawaiian-language newspapers, and foreign attempts to free Hawaiians of their pagan superstitions. These songs and the ones engendered by them, written by queens and hula masters and Presbyterian ministers alike, become the evocative centerpiece for Susanna Moore's mesmerizing discovery of Hawaii.

Synopsis:

The acclaimed novelist returns to her native Hawaii to offer a celebration of the myth, culture, landscape, and music of Kauai as it reveals the rich Polynesian traditions that have shaped the modern island state.

Synopsis:

The islands of Hawaii have often served Susanna Moore as the canvas for her lush and haunting novels. In I Myself have Seen It, she proves the mystery, beauty, and myth of her native islands to be every bit as compelling as her fiction. She interweaves her own memories of growing up in Honolulu in the 1950s and '60s with a concise chronicle of Hawaii's two-hundred-year encounter with the West. Seeking the elusive heart of Hawaii, Moore revisits the small rural island of Kauai. In the breathtaking landscape, she discovers that old, unwritten songs of Polynesia have survived despite the onslaught of missionaries in the early 18th century, the establishment of Hawaiian-language newspapers, and foreign attempts to free Hawaiians of their pagan superstitions. These songs and the ones engendered by them, written by queens and hula masters alike, become the centerpiece for Moore's mesmerizing discovery of the real Hawaii.

Synopsis:

Includes bibliographical references (p. 179-184).

About the Author

Susanna Moore was raised in Hawaii and now lives in New York City. She is the author of The Whiteness of Bones, Sleeping Beauties, and In the Cut. My Old Sweetheart, her first novel, won the PEN/Ernest Hemingway Citation and the Sue Kaufman Prize from the American Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters. 

Product Details

ISBN:
9780792265283
Author:
Newhouse, Elizabeth
Publisher:
National Geographic Society
Location:
Washington, D.C.
Subject:
United States - West - Pacific (General)
Subject:
History
Subject:
Folk & Traditional
Subject:
United States - General
Subject:
United States - Pacific - Hawaii
Subject:
Hawaii
Subject:
Essays & Travelogues
Subject:
Novelists, American
Subject:
General Travel
Subject:
Genres & Styles - Folk & Traditional
Subject:
Intellectual life
Subject:
Novelists, American -- 20th century.
Subject:
Travel Writing-General
Copyright:
Series:
National Geographic Directions
Series Volume:
FS-116-02
Publication Date:
April 2003
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
1 MAP
Pages:
192
Dimensions:
8.22x5.80x.86 in. .82 lbs.

Other books you might like

  1. One Last Look
    Used Hardcover $0.95
  2. Be More Chill
    Used Trade Paper $5.50
  3. The Water of Kane: And Other Legends... Used Trade Paper $8.50
  4. Red Ranger came calling :a... Used Hardcover $9.50
  5. Shoal of Time: A History of the... Used Trade Paper $4.95
  6. My Soul Is Rested
    Used Trade Paper $10.00

Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Music » Genres and Styles » Folk » Folk and Traditional
Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z
History and Social Science » Americana » Hawaii
Science and Mathematics » Nature Studies » Birds » Birdwatching
Science and Mathematics » Nature Studies » Birds » General
Science and Mathematics » Ornithology » General Ornithology and Birding
Travel » North America » United States » Western States
Travel » Travel Writing » General

I Myself Have Seen It (National Geographic Directions) New Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$18.75 In Stock
Product details 192 pages National Geographic Society - English 9780792265283 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , The acclaimed novelist returns to her native Hawaii to offer a celebration of the myth, culture, landscape, and music of Kauai as it reveals the rich Polynesian traditions that have shaped the modern island state.
"Synopsis" by , The islands of Hawaii have often served Susanna Moore as the canvas for her lush and haunting novels. In I Myself have Seen It, she proves the mystery, beauty, and myth of her native islands to be every bit as compelling as her fiction. She interweaves her own memories of growing up in Honolulu in the 1950s and '60s with a concise chronicle of Hawaii's two-hundred-year encounter with the West. Seeking the elusive heart of Hawaii, Moore revisits the small rural island of Kauai. In the breathtaking landscape, she discovers that old, unwritten songs of Polynesia have survived despite the onslaught of missionaries in the early 18th century, the establishment of Hawaiian-language newspapers, and foreign attempts to free Hawaiians of their pagan superstitions. These songs and the ones engendered by them, written by queens and hula masters alike, become the centerpiece for Moore's mesmerizing discovery of the real Hawaii.
"Synopsis" by , Includes bibliographical references (p. 179-184).
spacer
spacer
  • back to top
Follow us on...




Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.