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The Bonus Army: An American Epic

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The Bonus Army: An American Epic Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

In the summer of 1932, at the height of the Depression, some 45,000 veterans of World War I descended on Washington, D.C., to demand the bonus promised them eight years earlier for their wartime service. They lived in shantytowns, white and black together, and for two months they protested for their cause — an action that would have a profound effect on American history.

President Herbert Hoover, Army Chief of Staff Douglas MacArthur, and others feared the protesters would turn violent after the Senate defeated the "bonus bill" passed by the House. On July 28, 1932, tanks rolled through the streets as MacArthur's troops evicted the bonus marchers: Newspapers and newsreels showed graphic images of American soldiers driving out their former comrades in arms. Democratic candidate Franklin Roosevelt, in a critical contest with Hoover, upon reading newspaper accounts of the eviction said to an adviser, "This will elect me," though bonus armies would plague him in each of his first three years.

Through seminal research, including interviews with the last surviving witnesses, Paul Dickson and Thomas B. Allen tell the full and dramatic story of the Bonus Army and of the many celebrated figures involved in it: Evalyn Walsh McLean, the owner of the Hope diamond, sided with the marchers; Roy Wilkins saw the model for racial integration there; J. Edgar Hoover built his reputation against the Bonus Army radicals; a young Gore Vidal witnessed the crisis while John dos Passos, Sherwood Anderson, and Sinclair Lewis wrote about it. Dickson and Allen also recover the voices of ordinary men who dared tilt at powerful injustice, and who ultimately transformed the nation: the march inspired Congress to pass the G.I. Bill of Rights in 1944, one of the most important pieces of social legislation in our history, which in large part created America's middle class. The Bonus Army is an epic story in the saga of our country.

Review:

"Before the Million Man March, the Million Mom March or Martin Luther King, Jr.'s March on Washington, there was the Bonus Expeditionary Force (BEF): 45,000 WWI vets who, in 1932, swarmed Washington, D.C., in freight cars, crank-start jalopies, on motorcycles and even on foot from as far away as Portland, Ore., to demand payment of the bonus promised them at the end of the war. As Dickson and Allen show throughout this empathetic and well-researched volume, the BEF meant different things to a number of groups vying for power in the tumultuous political climate of the early '30s. Communist organizers saw the veterans as the shock troops of the emerging 'American Soviet Government'; the Hoover administration viewed them as mostly 'ex-convicts, persons with criminal records, radicals, and non-servicemen' trying to strong-arm the government; and corporate America saw them as competition for dwindling government aid money. To most Americans, however, they were underdogs fighting the government and the corporate corruption that, in their minds, was responsible for the Depression. The book moves beyond these broad generalizations to find the personal stories of the march, fleshing out both minor and major players surrounding the BEF. And in describing the use of tanks, bayonets and tear gas to expel the unarmed vets and their families from Washington-as well as the deadly mistreatment of BEF members in government work camps after the march-Dickson and Allen highlight the sacrifices these women and men made on our own soil to win fair treatment for veterans of future wars. Their important and moving work will appeal to both professional historians and casual readers interested in the history of America's changing attitudes towards its soldiers." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"A lively, engaging work of history." Kirkus Reviews

Review:

"The Bonus Army is a terrific book. Exhaustively researched but simply written, it holds the reader's attention from beginning to end. I personally remember the momentous events of the July day in 1932, but before reading this account I had no idea of the drama, the pathos, the confusion, and the lasting importance of the event. Highly recommended for any reader who seeks a rounded knowledge of America of the twentieth century." John S.D. Eisenhower

Synopsis:

Through seminal research, including interviews with the last surviving witnesses, the authors tell the dramatic story of the Bonus Army and the many celebrated figures involved in the protest that had a profound effect on American history.

Synopsis:

In the summer of 1932, at the height of the Depression, some forty-five thousand veterans of World War I descended on Washington, D.C., from all over the country to demand the bonus promised them eight years earlier for their wartime service. They lived in shantytowns, white and black together, and for two months they protested and rallied for their cause—an action that would have a profound effect on American history.

President Herbert Hoover, Army Chief of Staff Douglas MacArthur, and others feared the protesters would turn violent after the Senate defeated the "bonus bill" that the House had passed. On July 28, 1932, tanks rolled through the streets as MacArthur's troops evicted the bonus marchers: Newspapers and newsreels showed graphic images of American soldiers driving out their former comrades in arms. Democratic candidate, Franklin Roosevelt, in a critical contest with Hoover, upon reading newspaper accounts of the eviction said to an adviser, "This will elect me," though bonus armies would plague him in each of his first three years.

Through seminal research, including interviews with the last surviving witnesses, Paul Dickson and Thomas B. Allen tell the full and dramatic story of the Bonus Army and of the many celebrated figures involved in it: Evalyn Walsh McLean, the owner of the hope diamond, sided with the marchers; Roy Wilkins saw the model for racial integration here; J. Edgar Hoover built his reputation against the Bonus Army radicals; a young Gore Vidal witnessed the crisis while John dos Passos, Sherwood Anderson, and Sinclair Lewis wrote about it. Dickson and Allen also recover the voices of ordinary men who dared tilt at powerful injustice, and who ultimately transformed the nation: The march inspired Congress to pass the G. I. Bill of Rights in 1944, one of the most important pieces of social legislation in our history, which in large part created Americas middle class. The Bonus Army is an epic story in the saga of our country.

Synopsis:

In the summer of 1932, at the height of the Depression, some forty-five thousand veterans of World War I descended on Washington, D.C., from all over the country to demand the bonus promised them eight years earlier for their wartime service. They lived in shantytowns, white and black together, and for two months they protested and rallied for their cause--an action that would have a profound effect on American history.

President Herbert Hoover, Army Chief of Staff Douglas MacArthur, and others feared the protesters would turn violent after the Senate defeated the bonus bill that the House had passed. On July 28, 1932, tanks rolled through the streets as MacArthur's troops evicted the bonus marchers: Newspapers and newsreels showed graphic images of American soldiers driving out their former comrades in arms. Democratic candidate, Franklin Roosevelt, in a critical contest with Hoover, upon reading newspaper accounts of the eviction said to an adviser, This will elect me, though bonus armies would plague him in each of his first three years.

Through seminal research, including interviews with the last surviving witnesses, Paul Dickson and Thomas B. Allen tell the full and dramatic story of the Bonus Army and of the many celebrated figures involved in it: Evalyn Walsh McLean, the owner of the hope diamond, sided with the marchers; Roy Wilkins saw the model for racial integration here; J. Edgar Hoover built his reputation against the Bonus Army radicals; a young Gore Vidal witnessed the crisis while John dos Passos, Sherwood Anderson, and Sinclair Lewis wrote about it. Dickson and Allen also recover the voices of ordinary men who dared tilt at powerful injustice, and who ultimately transformed the nation: The march inspired Congress to pass the G. I. Bill of Rights in 1944, one of the most important pieces of social legislation in our history, which in large part created America's middle class. The Bonus Army is an epic story in the saga of our country. Paul Dickson is the author of Sputnik: The Shock of the Century and numerous books about history, the American language, and baseball. He lives in Garrett Park, Maryland. Thomas B. Allen is the author of The Blue and Gray; War Games; George Washington, Spymaster; and many other books of military and intelligence history. He lives in Bethesda, Maryland. During the summer of 1932, in the depths of the Depression, some 45,000 World War I veterans descended on Washington, D.C., to demand immediate payment of a cash bonus promised them eight years earlier for their wartime service. They lived in shantytowns, white and black together, and for two months they rallied peacefully for their cause--an action that would have a profound effect on American history. Despite their efforts, the bonus bill was defeated in the Senate after passage by the House. President Herbert Hoover, Army Chief of Staff Douglas MacArthur, and others--fearing the veterans were controlled by Communists and would turn violent--decided they had to be removed from their bivouac near the Capitol. On July 28, 1932, going beyond presidential orders, MacArthur drove the veterans out of the city with tanks, tear gas, and soldiers wielding bayonet-tipped rifles. Upon reading newspaper accounts of the eviction, Democratic candidate Franklin D. Roosevelt, in a critical contest with Hoover for the presidency, said to an adviser, This will elect me. Yet Roosevelt proved even more determined than Hoover not to pay the bonus, and bonus armies returned in the first three years of his administration. Seeking a solution, Roosevelt sent many to work camps in Florida, where, on Labor Day, 1935, the worst hurricane ever to strike the United States killed some 250 unprotected vets, prompting a New Deal whitewash and cover-up of the facts. Through seminal research including interviews with the last surviving witnesses, Paul Dickson and Thomas B. Allen have unraveled the full and dramatic story of the Bonus Army, and of the many celebrated and unlikely figures involved: MacArthur and his aide; Dwight D. Eisenhower; Evalyn Walsh McLean, owner of the Hope Diamond, who sided with the marchers against the Washington establishment; Roy Wilkins, then a young reporter, who saw in the veterans' campsites the model for racial integration in America; and Ernest Hemingway, who took up the cause of the vets who died in the Florida Keys. Dickson and Allen also recover the voices of ordinary people who dared tilt at powerful injustice. The bonus was finally paid in 1936 when Congress overruled Roosevelt's fourth veto. But the Bonus Army's ultimate legacy came in 1944 when Congress passed the GI Bill of Rights, one of the most important pieces of social legislation in U.S. history, which in many ways transformed the nation. A prodigious research project . . . A revealing and bleakly fascinating account . . . The book's most haunting aspect is its verbal and pictorial record of the marchers' individual experiences . . . For all the defeats that the Bonus Army endured, its struggle paved the way for the G.I. Bill of Rights. And it underscored the power that could be unleashed by the marcher who made himself 'a petition in boots.' Its legacy was of great importance to the World War II veterans whose homecomings were a far cry from the hardships and indignities of the 1930's. That legacy is all the more meaningful today.--Janet Maslin, The New York Times

By a far stretch the best-written account of the BEF Bonus Expeditionary Force] and the first scholarly attempt in nearly two decades. The authors, both experienced history writers, debunk many of the old myths and shine new light on this astonishing episode . . . In telling the story of The Bonus Army, in a gripping style packed with facts, Dickson and Allen do great honor to all veterans--and remind us that one of our most important battles was fought with blood and fire at the steps of our own government.--Joel Turnipseed, The Star Tribune (Minneapolis)

This thoroughly researched and eminently readable book is one that every veteran, indeed, every American should read . . . Mr. Dickson and Mr. Allen have done a fine job of reminding Americans of the almost forgotten fight a relatively few of them made to finally shame the Congress into paying what in effect was a mere pittance in return for the sacrifices they had made during the Great War.--Lyn Nofziger, The Washington Times

The authors argue that this is one of the pivotal events of 20th-century U.S. history, and they make a good case . . . The benefits veterans have today express a stronger appreciation of service. This book is a reminder that they also have another purpose, which is to ensure nothing like this ever happens again.--Bruce Ramsey, The Seattle Times

Extensively researched and documented, The Bonus Army provides a valuable historical record as well as a timely look at how this nation has treated its veterans.--Jewel Lansing, The Oregonian (Portland)

A timely reminder of society's obligations to returned soldiers.--Roger K. Miller, Denver Post

The Bonus Army is a feat of research and analysis--a thoughtful, strong argument that these marches were among the most important demonstrations of the 20th century. Dickson and Allen speculate about why the episode is not more widely known. They cite as possible reasons the encampment's integration in segregated Washington, the ease with which the marchers could be dismissed as Communists, and the fact that no political party stood to gain from the movement's success or failure . . . Dickson and Allen do paint moving, harrowing portraits of individuals' plights and make clear how the corps' ordeal laid the groundwork for the legislation that became the GI Bill of Rights.--Bookmarks magazine

The Bonus Army is a terrific book. Exhaustively researched but simply written, it holds the reader's attention from beginning to end. I personally remember the momentous events of the July day in 1932, but before reading this account I had no idea of the drama, the pathos, the confusion, and the lasting importance of the event. Highly recommended for any reader who seeks a rounded knowledge of America in the twentieth century.--John S. D. Eisenhower

A tragic yet enormously important chapter in the making of twentieth-century America, beautifully and brilliantly told by Dickson and Allen. The GI Bill lifted ten million veterans into the middle class through vocational rehabilitation, low-cost home mortgages, college tuition, and living expenses. Without the Bonus Army tragedy, there never would have been a GI Bill. You cannot fully understand contemporary America unless you understand the Bonus Army.--Mark Shields

In The Bonus Army, authors Paul Dickson and Thomas B. Allen provide astonishing and largely forgotten, account of how our veterans, fueled by desperation and determination, anger and honor, overcame political obstacles and tactics as formidable as those they had faced on the battlefield. This is must reading, not only for today's political leaders, but for all Americans who understand the need to fight for the fair treatment of those we ask to carry the fight for freedom.--Williams S. Cohen, former Secretary of Defense

Meticulously researched and engagingly written, The Bonus Army captures the pathos and high emotion that this underappreciated episode in American history generated in 1932. As the nation prepares to welcome home another generation of wartime veterans, it offers a cautionary and instructional tale about the permanent bond that modern military service creates between veterans and the state.--Jennifer D. Keene, author of Doughboys, the Great War, and the Remaking of America

Usually treated as a minor episode during the Great Depression, the Bonus Army (if remembered at all) has served to contrast the leadership styles of Herbert Hoover and Frankli

About the Author

Paul Dickson is the author of more than forty books, including The Joy of Keeping Score, The New Dickson Baseball Dictionary, Baseball's Greatest Quotations, and Baseball: The Presidents' Game. In addition to baseball, his specialties include Americana and language. He lives in Garrett Park, Maryland.

Thomas B. Allen is an author whose writings range from articles for National Geographic Magazine to books on a variety of subjects. Allen's most recent books are George Washington, Spymaster, which tells how espionage helped to win the Revolutionary War, and Spy Book: The Encyclopedia of Espionage. He and his wife Scottie, a potter and member of Creative Partners Gallery, live in Bethesda, Maryland.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780802714404
Subtitle:
An American Epic
Author:
Paul Dickson and Thomas B. Allen
Author:
Allen, Thomas B.
Author:
Dickson, Paul
Publisher:
Walker & Company
Subject:
United States - 20th Century/Depression
Subject:
Military - Veterans
Subject:
Military - World War I
Copyright:
Edition Number:
1st
Edition Description:
Hardcover
Publication Date:
January 2005
Binding:
Hardback
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Yes
Pages:
368
Dimensions:
9.25 x 6.13 in

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Related Subjects

History and Social Science » US History » 1800 to 1945
History and Social Science » US History » 1920 to 1960
History and Social Science » US History » 20th Century » General

The Bonus Army: An American Epic Used Hardcover
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Product details 368 pages Walker & Company - English 9780802714404 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Before the Million Man March, the Million Mom March or Martin Luther King, Jr.'s March on Washington, there was the Bonus Expeditionary Force (BEF): 45,000 WWI vets who, in 1932, swarmed Washington, D.C., in freight cars, crank-start jalopies, on motorcycles and even on foot from as far away as Portland, Ore., to demand payment of the bonus promised them at the end of the war. As Dickson and Allen show throughout this empathetic and well-researched volume, the BEF meant different things to a number of groups vying for power in the tumultuous political climate of the early '30s. Communist organizers saw the veterans as the shock troops of the emerging 'American Soviet Government'; the Hoover administration viewed them as mostly 'ex-convicts, persons with criminal records, radicals, and non-servicemen' trying to strong-arm the government; and corporate America saw them as competition for dwindling government aid money. To most Americans, however, they were underdogs fighting the government and the corporate corruption that, in their minds, was responsible for the Depression. The book moves beyond these broad generalizations to find the personal stories of the march, fleshing out both minor and major players surrounding the BEF. And in describing the use of tanks, bayonets and tear gas to expel the unarmed vets and their families from Washington-as well as the deadly mistreatment of BEF members in government work camps after the march-Dickson and Allen highlight the sacrifices these women and men made on our own soil to win fair treatment for veterans of future wars. Their important and moving work will appeal to both professional historians and casual readers interested in the history of America's changing attitudes towards its soldiers." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review" by , "A lively, engaging work of history."
"Review" by , "The Bonus Army is a terrific book. Exhaustively researched but simply written, it holds the reader's attention from beginning to end. I personally remember the momentous events of the July day in 1932, but before reading this account I had no idea of the drama, the pathos, the confusion, and the lasting importance of the event. Highly recommended for any reader who seeks a rounded knowledge of America of the twentieth century."
"Synopsis" by , Through seminal research, including interviews with the last surviving witnesses, the authors tell the dramatic story of the Bonus Army and the many celebrated figures involved in the protest that had a profound effect on American history.
"Synopsis" by ,
In the summer of 1932, at the height of the Depression, some forty-five thousand veterans of World War I descended on Washington, D.C., from all over the country to demand the bonus promised them eight years earlier for their wartime service. They lived in shantytowns, white and black together, and for two months they protested and rallied for their cause—an action that would have a profound effect on American history.

President Herbert Hoover, Army Chief of Staff Douglas MacArthur, and others feared the protesters would turn violent after the Senate defeated the "bonus bill" that the House had passed. On July 28, 1932, tanks rolled through the streets as MacArthur's troops evicted the bonus marchers: Newspapers and newsreels showed graphic images of American soldiers driving out their former comrades in arms. Democratic candidate, Franklin Roosevelt, in a critical contest with Hoover, upon reading newspaper accounts of the eviction said to an adviser, "This will elect me," though bonus armies would plague him in each of his first three years.

Through seminal research, including interviews with the last surviving witnesses, Paul Dickson and Thomas B. Allen tell the full and dramatic story of the Bonus Army and of the many celebrated figures involved in it: Evalyn Walsh McLean, the owner of the hope diamond, sided with the marchers; Roy Wilkins saw the model for racial integration here; J. Edgar Hoover built his reputation against the Bonus Army radicals; a young Gore Vidal witnessed the crisis while John dos Passos, Sherwood Anderson, and Sinclair Lewis wrote about it. Dickson and Allen also recover the voices of ordinary men who dared tilt at powerful injustice, and who ultimately transformed the nation: The march inspired Congress to pass the G. I. Bill of Rights in 1944, one of the most important pieces of social legislation in our history, which in large part created Americas middle class. The Bonus Army is an epic story in the saga of our country.

"Synopsis" by , In the summer of 1932, at the height of the Depression, some forty-five thousand veterans of World War I descended on Washington, D.C., from all over the country to demand the bonus promised them eight years earlier for their wartime service. They lived in shantytowns, white and black together, and for two months they protested and rallied for their cause--an action that would have a profound effect on American history.

President Herbert Hoover, Army Chief of Staff Douglas MacArthur, and others feared the protesters would turn violent after the Senate defeated the bonus bill that the House had passed. On July 28, 1932, tanks rolled through the streets as MacArthur's troops evicted the bonus marchers: Newspapers and newsreels showed graphic images of American soldiers driving out their former comrades in arms. Democratic candidate, Franklin Roosevelt, in a critical contest with Hoover, upon reading newspaper accounts of the eviction said to an adviser, This will elect me, though bonus armies would plague him in each of his first three years.

Through seminal research, including interviews with the last surviving witnesses, Paul Dickson and Thomas B. Allen tell the full and dramatic story of the Bonus Army and of the many celebrated figures involved in it: Evalyn Walsh McLean, the owner of the hope diamond, sided with the marchers; Roy Wilkins saw the model for racial integration here; J. Edgar Hoover built his reputation against the Bonus Army radicals; a young Gore Vidal witnessed the crisis while John dos Passos, Sherwood Anderson, and Sinclair Lewis wrote about it. Dickson and Allen also recover the voices of ordinary men who dared tilt at powerful injustice, and who ultimately transformed the nation: The march inspired Congress to pass the G. I. Bill of Rights in 1944, one of the most important pieces of social legislation in our history, which in large part created America's middle class. The Bonus Army is an epic story in the saga of our country. Paul Dickson is the author of Sputnik: The Shock of the Century and numerous books about history, the American language, and baseball. He lives in Garrett Park, Maryland. Thomas B. Allen is the author of The Blue and Gray; War Games; George Washington, Spymaster; and many other books of military and intelligence history. He lives in Bethesda, Maryland. During the summer of 1932, in the depths of the Depression, some 45,000 World War I veterans descended on Washington, D.C., to demand immediate payment of a cash bonus promised them eight years earlier for their wartime service. They lived in shantytowns, white and black together, and for two months they rallied peacefully for their cause--an action that would have a profound effect on American history. Despite their efforts, the bonus bill was defeated in the Senate after passage by the House. President Herbert Hoover, Army Chief of Staff Douglas MacArthur, and others--fearing the veterans were controlled by Communists and would turn violent--decided they had to be removed from their bivouac near the Capitol. On July 28, 1932, going beyond presidential orders, MacArthur drove the veterans out of the city with tanks, tear gas, and soldiers wielding bayonet-tipped rifles. Upon reading newspaper accounts of the eviction, Democratic candidate Franklin D. Roosevelt, in a critical contest with Hoover for the presidency, said to an adviser, This will elect me. Yet Roosevelt proved even more determined than Hoover not to pay the bonus, and bonus armies returned in the first three years of his administration. Seeking a solution, Roosevelt sent many to work camps in Florida, where, on Labor Day, 1935, the worst hurricane ever to strike the United States killed some 250 unprotected vets, prompting a New Deal whitewash and cover-up of the facts. Through seminal research including interviews with the last surviving witnesses, Paul Dickson and Thomas B. Allen have unraveled the full and dramatic story of the Bonus Army, and of the many celebrated and unlikely figures involved: MacArthur and his aide; Dwight D. Eisenhower; Evalyn Walsh McLean, owner of the Hope Diamond, who sided with the marchers against the Washington establishment; Roy Wilkins, then a young reporter, who saw in the veterans' campsites the model for racial integration in America; and Ernest Hemingway, who took up the cause of the vets who died in the Florida Keys. Dickson and Allen also recover the voices of ordinary people who dared tilt at powerful injustice. The bonus was finally paid in 1936 when Congress overruled Roosevelt's fourth veto. But the Bonus Army's ultimate legacy came in 1944 when Congress passed the GI Bill of Rights, one of the most important pieces of social legislation in U.S. history, which in many ways transformed the nation. A prodigious research project . . . A revealing and bleakly fascinating account . . . The book's most haunting aspect is its verbal and pictorial record of the marchers' individual experiences . . . For all the defeats that the Bonus Army endured, its struggle paved the way for the G.I. Bill of Rights. And it underscored the power that could be unleashed by the marcher who made himself 'a petition in boots.' Its legacy was of great importance to the World War II veterans whose homecomings were a far cry from the hardships and indignities of the 1930's. That legacy is all the more meaningful today.--Janet Maslin, The New York Times

By a far stretch the best-written account of the BEF Bonus Expeditionary Force] and the first scholarly attempt in nearly two decades. The authors, both experienced history writers, debunk many of the old myths and shine new light on this astonishing episode . . . In telling the story of The Bonus Army, in a gripping style packed with facts, Dickson and Allen do great honor to all veterans--and remind us that one of our most important battles was fought with blood and fire at the steps of our own government.--Joel Turnipseed, The Star Tribune (Minneapolis)

This thoroughly researched and eminently readable book is one that every veteran, indeed, every American should read . . . Mr. Dickson and Mr. Allen have done a fine job of reminding Americans of the almost forgotten fight a relatively few of them made to finally shame the Congress into paying what in effect was a mere pittance in return for the sacrifices they had made during the Great War.--Lyn Nofziger, The Washington Times

The authors argue that this is one of the pivotal events of 20th-century U.S. history, and they make a good case . . . The benefits veterans have today express a stronger appreciation of service. This book is a reminder that they also have another purpose, which is to ensure nothing like this ever happens again.--Bruce Ramsey, The Seattle Times

Extensively researched and documented, The Bonus Army provides a valuable historical record as well as a timely look at how this nation has treated its veterans.--Jewel Lansing, The Oregonian (Portland)

A timely reminder of society's obligations to returned soldiers.--Roger K. Miller, Denver Post

The Bonus Army is a feat of research and analysis--a thoughtful, strong argument that these marches were among the most important demonstrations of the 20th century. Dickson and Allen speculate about why the episode is not more widely known. They cite as possible reasons the encampment's integration in segregated Washington, the ease with which the marchers could be dismissed as Communists, and the fact that no political party stood to gain from the movement's success or failure . . . Dickson and Allen do paint moving, harrowing portraits of individuals' plights and make clear how the corps' ordeal laid the groundwork for the legislation that became the GI Bill of Rights.--Bookmarks magazine

The Bonus Army is a terrific book. Exhaustively researched but simply written, it holds the reader's attention from beginning to end. I personally remember the momentous events of the July day in 1932, but before reading this account I had no idea of the drama, the pathos, the confusion, and the lasting importance of the event. Highly recommended for any reader who seeks a rounded knowledge of America in the twentieth century.--John S. D. Eisenhower

A tragic yet enormously important chapter in the making of twentieth-century America, beautifully and brilliantly told by Dickson and Allen. The GI Bill lifted ten million veterans into the middle class through vocational rehabilitation, low-cost home mortgages, college tuition, and living expenses. Without the Bonus Army tragedy, there never would have been a GI Bill. You cannot fully understand contemporary America unless you understand the Bonus Army.--Mark Shields

In The Bonus Army, authors Paul Dickson and Thomas B. Allen provide astonishing and largely forgotten, account of how our veterans, fueled by desperation and determination, anger and honor, overcame political obstacles and tactics as formidable as those they had faced on the battlefield. This is must reading, not only for today's political leaders, but for all Americans who understand the need to fight for the fair treatment of those we ask to carry the fight for freedom.--Williams S. Cohen, former Secretary of Defense

Meticulously researched and engagingly written, The Bonus Army captures the pathos and high emotion that this underappreciated episode in American history generated in 1932. As the nation prepares to welcome home another generation of wartime veterans, it offers a cautionary and instructional tale about the permanent bond that modern military service creates between veterans and the state.--Jennifer D. Keene, author of Doughboys, the Great War, and the Remaking of America

Usually treated as a minor episode during the Great Depression, the Bonus Army (if remembered at all) has served to contrast the leadership styles of Herbert Hoover and Frankli

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