Poetry Madness
 
 

Special Offers see all

Enter to WIN a $100 Credit

Subscribe to PowellsBooks.news
for a chance to win.
Privacy Policy

Visit our stores


    Recently Viewed clear list


    Interviews | March 10, 2015

    Shawn Donley: IMG Claire Fuller: The Powells.com Interview



    Claire FullerOur Endless Numbered Days tells the story of eight-year-old Peggy and her survivalist father, James, who inexplicably leave behind their London home... Continue »

    spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$8.95
Used Hardcover
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
Qty Store Section
2 Burnside African American Studies- General

Waiting 'Til the Midnight Hour: A Narrative History of Black Power in America

by

Waiting 'Til the Midnight Hour: A Narrative History of Black Power in America Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

A gripping narrative that brings to life a legendary moment in American history: the birth, life, and death of the Black Power movement

With the rallying cry of "Black Power!" in 1966, a group of black activists, including Stokely Carmichael and Huey P. Newton, turned their backs on Martin Luther King's pacifism and, building on Malcolm X's legacy, pioneered a radical new approach to the fight for equality. Waiting 'Til the Midnight Hour is a history of the Black Power movement, that storied group of men and women who would become American icons of the struggle for racial equality.

Peniel E. Joseph traces the history of the men and women of the movement--many of them famous or infamous, others forgotten. Waiting 'Til the Midnight Hour begins in Harlem in the 1950s, where, despite the Cold War's hostile climate, black writers, artists, and activists built a new urban militancy that was the movement's earliest incarnation. In a series of character-driven chapters, we witness the rise of Black Power groups such as the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee and the Black Panthers, and with them, on both coasts of the country, a fundamental change in the way Americans understood the unfinished business of racial equality and integration.

Drawing on original archival research and more than sixty original oral histories, this narrative history vividly invokes the way in which Black Power redefined black identity and culture and in the process redrew the landscape of American race relations.

Review:

"Whereas black nationalism can be traced to Marcus Garvey (and his predecessors), Black Power was first articulated by Stokely Carmichael in 1966. This accessible survey looks at 'the murky depths of a movement that paralleled, and at times overlapped, the heroic civil rights era,' beginning in the late 1950s, with the rise of the Black Muslims, and ending in 1975. Joseph, who teaches Africana studies at SUNY — Stony Brook, brings to light less-known characters like the Rev. Albert Cleage Jr. of Detroit, who helped organize the 1963 Walk for Freedom a month before the March on Washington, as well as fresh judgments on figures like Malcolm X, 'black America's prosecuting attorney.' He analyzes the negative media coverage of Black Power, offers a discerning take on Carmichael and Charles Hamilton's 1967 book, Black Power, and recounts the emergence of the Black Arts movement. The Black Panthers also get consistent attention, in rise and decline. Drawing on a rich set of sources, including interviews and oral histories, the book also illuminates flash points in Newark, N.J.; Oakland, Calif.; and the Sixth Pan-African Congress in Dar es Salaam in 1974. Though it focuses more on politics than culture — e.g., the 1968 Olympics protest gets just a footnote — it's a good introduction to the topic." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"Black Power — the slogan that became a movement — is seared in the American public memory. Who could forget the iconic poster image of Black Panther leader Huey Newton, garbed in a turtleneck and a black beret, holding an African spear in one hand and a rifle in the other? Or Tommie Smith and John Carlos raising their arms in a clenched-fist Black Power salute at the 1968 Summer Olympics in Mexico... Washington Post Book Review (read the entire Washington Post review)

Book News Annotation:

By drawing on archival material and oral histories, Joseph (Africana studies, SUNY-Stony Brook) moves beyond slogans and symbols to provide a nuanced, detailed study of the Black Power movement in the US. He covers not only the major events and players but also the complicated negotiations between unlikely allies and the participation of unknown men and women committed to the cause. Joseph's ability to situate the Black Power movement in a global context gives an added dimension to this valuable contribution to scholarship about the struggle for civil rights. Annotation ©2006 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Synopsis:

A gripping narrative that brings to life a legendary moment in American history: the birth, life, and death of the Black Power movement.

Synopsis:

"Once in a while a book comes along that projects the spirit of an era; this is one of them . . . Vibrant and expressive . . . A well-researched and well-written work." --The Philadelphia Inquirer
 
With the rallying cry of "Black Power!" in 1966, a group of black activists, including Stokely Carmichael and Huey P. Newton, turned their backs on Martin Luther King's pacifism and, building on Malcolm X's legacy, pioneered a radical new approach to the fight for equality. Drawing on original archival research and more than sixty original oral histories, Peniel E. Joseph vividly invokes the way in which Black Power redefined black identity and culture and in the process redrew the landscape of American race relations. In a series of character-driven chapters, we witness the rise of Black Power groups such as the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee and the Black Panthers, and with them, on both coasts of the country, a fundamental change in the way Americans understood the unfinished business of racial equality and integration.

Waiting 'Til the Midnight Hour traces the history of the Black Power movement, that storied group of men and women who would become American icons of the struggle for racial equality.

About the Author

Peniel E. Joseph is an assistant professor of Africana studies at SUNY-Stony Brook. The recipient of fellowships from the Woodrow Wilson

International Center for Scholars and the Ford Foundation, his work has appeared in Souls, New Formations, and The Black Scholar, and he is editor of a forthcoming anthology on the Black Power movement. He lives in Brooklyn, New York.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780805075397
Subtitle:
A Narrative History of Black Power in America
Author:
Joseph, Peniel E
Author:
Joseph, Peniel E.
Author:
Peniel, Joseph E.
Publisher:
Holt Paperbacks
Subject:
General
Subject:
History
Subject:
Race relations
Subject:
Ethnic Studies - African American Studies - Histor
Subject:
General History
Subject:
History & Theory - General
Subject:
African Americans - Civil rights - History -
Subject:
United States Race relations.
Subject:
United States - 20th Century
Subject:
Ethnic Studies - African American Studies
Copyright:
Publication Date:
20070710
Binding:
Electronic book text in proprietary or open standard format
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
1 8-pg. insert
Pages:
432
Dimensions:
8.4 x 5.6 x 1 in 0.715 lb

Other books you might like

  1. Best Democracy Money Can Buy : The...
    Used Trade Paper $5.50
  2. Buddha or Bust: In Search of Truth,... Used Trade Paper $4.95
  3. Persuasion Used Trade Paper $1.95
  4. Armed Madhouse : Who's Afraid of...
    Sale Hardcover $1.00
  5. The Omnivore's Dilemma: A Natural...
    Used Hardcover $8.95

Related Subjects

Health and Self-Help » Health and Medicine » General
Health and Self-Help » Health and Medicine » General Medicine
Health and Self-Help » Health and Medicine » Medical Specialties
History and Social Science » African American Studies » Civil Rights Movement
History and Social Science » African American Studies » General
History and Social Science » Politics » General
History and Social Science » Politics » United States » Politics

Waiting 'Til the Midnight Hour: A Narrative History of Black Power in America Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$8.95 In Stock
Product details 432 pages Henry Holt & Company - English 9780805075397 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Whereas black nationalism can be traced to Marcus Garvey (and his predecessors), Black Power was first articulated by Stokely Carmichael in 1966. This accessible survey looks at 'the murky depths of a movement that paralleled, and at times overlapped, the heroic civil rights era,' beginning in the late 1950s, with the rise of the Black Muslims, and ending in 1975. Joseph, who teaches Africana studies at SUNY — Stony Brook, brings to light less-known characters like the Rev. Albert Cleage Jr. of Detroit, who helped organize the 1963 Walk for Freedom a month before the March on Washington, as well as fresh judgments on figures like Malcolm X, 'black America's prosecuting attorney.' He analyzes the negative media coverage of Black Power, offers a discerning take on Carmichael and Charles Hamilton's 1967 book, Black Power, and recounts the emergence of the Black Arts movement. The Black Panthers also get consistent attention, in rise and decline. Drawing on a rich set of sources, including interviews and oral histories, the book also illuminates flash points in Newark, N.J.; Oakland, Calif.; and the Sixth Pan-African Congress in Dar es Salaam in 1974. Though it focuses more on politics than culture — e.g., the 1968 Olympics protest gets just a footnote — it's a good introduction to the topic." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Synopsis" by , A gripping narrative that brings to life a legendary moment in American history: the birth, life, and death of the Black Power movement.
"Synopsis" by ,
"Once in a while a book comes along that projects the spirit of an era; this is one of them . . . Vibrant and expressive . . . A well-researched and well-written work." --The Philadelphia Inquirer
 
With the rallying cry of "Black Power!" in 1966, a group of black activists, including Stokely Carmichael and Huey P. Newton, turned their backs on Martin Luther King's pacifism and, building on Malcolm X's legacy, pioneered a radical new approach to the fight for equality. Drawing on original archival research and more than sixty original oral histories, Peniel E. Joseph vividly invokes the way in which Black Power redefined black identity and culture and in the process redrew the landscape of American race relations. In a series of character-driven chapters, we witness the rise of Black Power groups such as the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee and the Black Panthers, and with them, on both coasts of the country, a fundamental change in the way Americans understood the unfinished business of racial equality and integration.

Waiting 'Til the Midnight Hour traces the history of the Black Power movement, that storied group of men and women who would become American icons of the struggle for racial equality.

spacer
spacer
  • back to top

FOLLOW US ON...

     
Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.