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Lois Leveen: IMG Forsooth Me Not: Shakespeare, Juliet, Her Nurse, and a Novel



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Louisa May Alcott: The Woman Behind Little Women

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ISBN13: 9780805082999
ISBN10: 0805082999
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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

A vivid, energetic account of the life of Louisa May Alcott, whose work has delighted millions of readers

Louisa May Alcott portrays a writer as worthy of interest in her own right as her most famous character, Jo March, and addresses all aspects of Alcotts life: the effect of her fathers self-indulgent utopian schemes; her familys chronic economic difficulties and frequent uprootings; her experience as a nurse in the Civil War; the loss of her health and frequent recourse to opiates in search of relief from migraines, insomnia, and symptomatic pain. Stories and details culled from Alcotts journals; her equally rich letters to family, friends, publishers, and admiring readers; and the correspondence, journals, and recollections of her family, friends, and famous contemporaries provide the basis for this lively account of the authors classic rags-to-riches tale.

Alcott would become the equivalent of a multimillionaire in her lifetime based on the astounding sales of her books, leaving contemporaries like Nathaniel Hawthorne, Herman Melville, and Henry James in the dust. This biography explores Alcotts life in the context of her works, all of which are to some extent autobiographical. A fresh, modern take on this remarkable and prolific writer, who secretly authored pulp fiction, harbored radical abolitionist views, and completed heroic service as a Civil War nurse, Louisa May Alcott is in the end also the story of how the all-time beloved American classic Little Women came to be. This revelatory portrait will present the popular author as she was and as she has never been seen before.

Harriet Reisens interest in Louisa May Alcott dates to her marathon reading of Alcotts eight childrens novels during a rainy spell one childhood summer. Over the past twenty years, what began as an idea for a film biography of Alcott developed into a passion for the subject herself. A former fellow in screenwriting at the American Film Institute, Reisen has written dramatic and historical documentary scripts for PBS and HBO, and radio commentary for Morning Edition and Marketplace. She lives in Massachusetts.

Louisa May Alcott portrays a writer as worthy of interest in her own right as her most famous character, Jo March, and addresses all aspects of Alcotts life: the effect of her fathers self-indulgent utopian schemes; her familys chronic economic difficulties and frequent uprootings; her experience as a nurse in the Civil War; the loss of her health and frequent recourse to opiates in search of relief from migraines, insomnia, and symptomatic pain. Stories and details culled from Alcotts journals; her equally rich letters to family, friends, publishers, and admiring readers; and the correspondence, journals, and recollections of her family, friends, and famous contemporaries provide the basis for this account of the authors life, a classic rags-to-riches story.

Alcott would become the equivalent of a multimillionaire in her lifetime; her books far outsold those by contemporaries like Nathaniel Hawthorne, Herman Melville, and Henry James. This biography explores Alcotts life in the context of her works, all of which are to some extent autobiographical. A modern take on this remarkable and prolific writer, who secretly authored pulp fiction, harbored radical abolitionist views, and completed heroic service as a Civil War nurse, Louisa May Alcott is also the story of how the beloved American classic Little Women came to be. This revelatory portrait presents a new perspective on the popular author.

“Every now and then, there appears a writer who has tracked a subject for so long through space and time that the resulting product ranks it superior to any of the facile interpretations or extended magazine articles that currently pass for biography. Such is the case with Harriet Reisen . . . Ms. Reisen is a master storyteller. Chapters are never formulaic. With compassion and insight, she propels readers on to the next adventure, sacrifice, tragedy and triumph.”—Marion Elizabeth Rodgers, The Washington Times

“As Harriet Reisen's enchanting biography reminds us, Alcott patterned the March family on her own and Jo on herself . . . [Her life] is richly examined in Ms. Reisen's full and vivid portrait.”—Melanie Kirkpatrick, The Wall Street Journal

“There may be better American novels, but Little Women surely ranks among the most cherished . . . Fans will adore Harriet Reisens sympathetic biography Louisa May Alcott. With charming verve, she details Alcotts remarkable if difficult life.”—USA Today

“Drawing heavily on family letters and journals, Reisens intimate biography . . . is a moving and sympathetic look at the Alcotts and their extraordinary cultural mileu.”—Julia M. Klein, Obit Magazine

“Harriet Reisen puts 20 years of study into a highly readable story. She casts a revealing new light upon an ambitious woman who was very much like her literary alter ego.”—Joyce Saenz Harris, The Dallas Morning News

"Louisa May Alcott's classic Little Women has been something of a rite of passage between mothers and daughters for generations. Mothers present their little girls with their very own copy of the book. And eventually, some lazy vacation day or rainy weekend is given over to a viewing of one the film versions of Alcott's book, whether it's the 1933 Katherine Hepburn version, the 1949 June Allyson vehicle, or the modern 1994 Winona Ryder interpretation. But while Little Women was, in part, autobiographical, the full story of the life and times of Louisa May Alcott is not so well known. Author and screenwriter Harriet Reisen has taken on that challenge, and the result is her comprehensive and eminently readable work Louisa May Alcott: The Woman Behind Little Women . . . Her book is at once sweeping and personal . . . Reisen's devotion both to scholarship and Alcott herself makes the book truly an interesting and engaging read . . . There are so many stories seemingly effortlessly woven into the book: not just Louisa's life but life in Boston in the 1800's, the anti-slavery movement, the Civil War, the transcendentalist movement, Louisa's father Bronson's life as a teacher and philosopher."—Victoria Shouldis, Concord Monitor

“A lively, engrossing portrait of Louisa May Alcott's life that will appeal to the legions of women who grew up worshipping the book . . . [Alcotts] spirit shines through in Reisens retelling.”—Meghan Barr, Associated Press

“Reisens lifelong fascination with Little Women and the woman who wrote it has produced an absorbing narrative, in many ways the best ever, of Alcotts own life . . . The utterly compelling force of Alcotts personality has never been better described. I found the book compulsively readable; I couldnt put it down.”—Robert Richardson, author of Emerson: The Mind on Fire and Henry Thoreau: A Life of the Mind

“Brilliantly researched . . . Her biography will occupy an essential place on any Alcott bookshelf.”—John Matteson, Pulitzer Prize-winning author of Edens Outcasts: The Story of Louisa May Alcott and Her Father

“A beautifully written, significant, and fascinating work. Harriet Reisen does with this biography what Alcott did with her writing—gives us a memorable and inspiring gift full of humanity, heart, and soul.”—Winona Ryder, producer and star of Little Women

“[Reisens] story equals—and maybe bests—her beloved book about the lively March sisters.”—Lisa Shea, Elle

"Reisen delivers an in-depth portrait of the spirited, sentimental, imaginative, realistic woman whose childhood vow was to 'be rich, famous, and happy.' Reisen draws extensively from Alcott's prodigious output of literary works, travel sketches, articles, journals and letters, as well as the recollections of her contemporaries . . . Reisen deftly weaves the story of Alcott's life into the rich social, cultural and historical fabric of mid-19th-century New England. The author's insightful examination reveals Alcott as a compulsive writer who peppered her stories with external details and internal currents of her life; an ardent abolitionist who served as a Civil War army nurse; a self-espoused spinster who cherished her independence but harbored a schoolgirl romantic attachment to Thoreau and a midlife crush on a young Polish pianist; a thoroughly modern feminist who wrote about the power struggle between the sexes and championed women's suffrage; and a middle-aged woman who relied on opiates to cope with her failing health. An absorbing portrait of the protean author whose 'life was no children's book.'"—Kirkus Reviews

"Reisen's writing is lively and appealing. She analyzes Alcott's best-known works—Little Women, Little Men, and Jo's Boys—as well as Pauline's Passion and Punishment, Behind a Mask, and Perilous Play, the pulp fiction Alcott wrote anonymously or as A.M. Barnard. Drawing extensively from Alcott's journals and letters as well as those of her family members, Reisen portrays Alcott's life with precision and sympathy yet does not hide her flaws. This compelling biography allows readers to know Alcott and appreciate her as 'her own best character.' Highly recommended for . . . readers interested in American women writers and women's studies."—Kathryn R. Bartelt, University of Evansville Libraries, Indiana, Library Journal

"Harriet Reisen's Louisa May Alcott: The Woman Behind Little Women does valiantly portray the beloved author as a stalwart woman whose life, as Reisen succinctly puts it, was no children's book. The daughter of impecunious transcendentalist Bronson Alcott and long-suffering Abigail May, as a girl Louisa Alcott watched her father preach esoteric uplift while practicing the penury that impoverished the family. Bronson's redeeming trait, Reisen speculates, may have been temporary insanity. The sadder case was Alcott's mother—the model for Marmee in Little Women—an intelligent woman harnessed to a man in search of the ineffable and, on occasion, young female acolytes. Louisa appointed herself the Golden Goose of these needy nurturers. Churning out what Reisen calls the chick-lit of its day to provide her mother and sisters the material comforts she never had, Alcott also used her imagination, according to Reisen, to escape the confines of ordinary life, although for Bronson Alcott's daughter, ordinary life was not all that ordinary; Reisen calculates that the family moved at least 30 times by Alcott's 20s. The ordeals of childhood were transmuted into rich literary endowments, Reisen explains. Alcott also wrote to earn parental approval; no longer was she a tomboy with a temper, though a careful reader can detect the anger beneath the surface of her most placid stories . . . Reisen's rich empathy for Alcott never falters and her chronicle of Alcott's exhausting attempt, as one friend remarked, to fill vacant niches in all things, whether in her family or in the world of popular literature, is heart-rending. As Reisen notes, Alcott simply wore herself out. Devotees of Little Women may be shocked that its self-medicating, troubled creator was not a jolly J.K. Rowling, though likely many of them know this. What they may not realize is that the redoubtable Alcott, who chose to be a free spinster and to paddle her own canoe, was decidedly strong but, alas, never free."—Brenda Wineapple, Publishers Weekly

Book News Annotation:

Reisen, a journalist, producer, and screenwriter who wrote the script for a PBS documentary on Alcott, provides a biography of Louis May Alcott (1832-1888) within the context of her works. Among the events she describes are the effect of her father's utopian schemes on her life, her family's economic difficulties and uprootings, her experience as a nurse during the Civil War, the loss of her health, her use of opiates to relieve migraines, insomnia, and pain, and the autobiographical nature of many of her writings. Included among Reisen's sources is an interview with Louisa's niece, which was never published. Annotation ©2010 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Synopsis:

In a fresh, modern take on the remarkable Louisa May Alcott, Harriet Reisens vivid biography explores the authors life in the context of her works, many of which are to some extent autobiographical. Although Alcott secretly wrote pulp fiction, harbored radical abolitionist views, and served as a Civil War nurse, her novels went on to sell more copies than those of Herman Melville and Henry James. Stories and details culled from Alcotts journals, together with revealing letters to family, friends, and publishers, plus recollections of her famous contemporaries provide the basis for this lively account of the authors classic rags-to-riches tale. In Louisa May Alcott, the extraordinary woman behind the beloved American classic Little Women is revealed as never before.

Synopsis:

A vivid, energetic account of the life of Louisa May Alcott, whose work has delighted millions of readers

Louisa May Alcott portrays a writer as worthy of interest in her own right as her most famous character, Jo March, and addresses all aspects of Alcotts life: the effect of her fathers self-indulgent utopian schemes; her familys chronic economic difficulties and frequent uprootings; her experience as a nurse in the Civil War; the loss of her health and frequent recourse to opiates in search of relief from migraines, insomnia, and symptomatic pain. Stories and details culled from Alcotts journals; her equally rich letters to family, friends, publishers, and admiring readers; and the correspondence, journals, and recollections of her family, friends, and famous contemporaries provide the basis for this lively account of the authors classic rags-to-riches tale.

Alcott would become the equivalent of a multimillionaire in her lifetime based on the astounding sales of her books, leaving contemporaries like Nathaniel Hawthorne, Herman Melville, and Henry James in the dust. This biography explores Alcotts life in the context of her works, all of which are to some extent autobiographical. A fresh, modern take on this remarkable and prolific writer, who secretly authored pulp fiction, harbored radical abolitionist views, and completed heroic service as a Civil War nurse, Louisa May Alcott is in the end also the story of how the all-time beloved American classic Little Women came to be. This revelatory portrait will present the popular author as she was and as she has never been seen before.

Harriet Reisens interest in Louisa May Alcott dates to her marathon reading of Alcotts eight childrens novels during a rainy spell one childhood summer. Over the past twenty years, what began as an idea for a film biography of Alcott developed into a passion for the subject herself. A former fellow in screenwriting at the American Film Institute, Reisen has written dramatic and historical documentary scripts for PBS and HBO, and radio commentary for Morning Edition and Marketplace. She lives in Massachusetts.

Louisa May Alcott portrays a writer as worthy of interest in her own right as her most famous character, Jo March, and addresses all aspects of Alcotts life: the effect of her fathers self-indulgent utopian schemes; her familys chronic economic difficulties and frequent uprootings; her experience as a nurse in the Civil War; the loss of her health and frequent recourse to opiates in search of relief from migraines, insomnia, and symptomatic pain. Stories and details culled from Alcotts journals; her equally rich letters to family, friends, publishers, and admiring readers; and the correspondence, journals, and recollections of her family, friends, and famous contemporaries provide the basis for this account of the authors life, a classic rags-to-riches story.

Alcott would become the equivalent of a multimillionaire in her lifetime; her books far outsold those by contemporaries like Nathaniel Hawthorne, Herman Melville, and Henry James. This biography explores Alcotts life in the context of her works, all of which are to some extent autobiographical. A modern take on this remarkable and prolific writer, who secretly authored pulp fiction, harbored radical abolitionist views, and completed heroic service as a Civil War nurse, Louisa May Alcott is also the story of how the beloved American classic Little Women came to be. This revelatory portrait presents a new perspective on the popular author.

“Every now and then, there appears a writer who has tracked a subject for so long through space and time that the resulting product ranks it superior to any of the facile interpretations or extended magazine articles that currently pass for biography. Such is the case with Harriet Reisen . . . Ms. Reisen is a master storyteller. Chapters are never formulaic. With compassion and insight, she propels readers on to the next adventure, sacrifice, tragedy and triumph.”Marion Elizabeth Rodgers, The Washington Times

“As Harriet Reisen's enchanting biography reminds us, Alcott patterned the March family on her own and Jo on herself . . . . [Her life] is richly examined in Ms. Reisen's full and vivid portrait.”Melanie Kirkpatrick, The Wall Street Journal

“There may be better American novels, but Little Women surely ranks among the most cherished. . . . Fans will adore Harriet Reisens sympathetic biography Louisa May Alcott. With charming verve, she details Alcotts remarkable if difficult life.”USA Today

“Drawing heavily on family letters and journals, Reisens intimate biography . . . is a moving and sympathetic look at the Alcotts and their extraordinary cultural mileu.”Julia M. Klein, Obit Magazine

“Harriet Reisen puts 20 years of study into a highly readable story. She casts a revealing new light upon an ambitious woman who was very much like her literary alter ego.”Joyce Saenz Harris, The Dallas Morning News

“Comprehensive and eminently readable . . . At once sweeping and personal . . . Reisens devotion both to scholarship and Alcott herself makes the book truly an interesting and engaging read.”Victoria Shouldis, Concord Monitor

“A lively, engrossing portrait of Louisa May Alcott's life that will appeal to the legions of women who grew up worshipping the book . . . [Alcotts] spirit shines through in Reisens retelling.”Meghan Barr, Associated Press

“Reisens lifelong fascination with Little Women and the woman who wrote it has produced an absorbing narrative, in many ways the best ever, of Alcotts own life . . . The utterly compelling force of Alcotts personality has never been better described. I found the book compulsively readable; I couldnt put it down.”Robert Richardson, author of Emerson: The Mind on Fire and Henry Thoreau: A Life of the Mind

“Brilliantly researched . . . Her biography will occupy an essential place on any Alcott bookshelf.”John Matteson, Pulitzer Prize-winning author of Edens Outcasts: The Story of Louisa May Alcott and Her Father

“A beautifully written, significant, and fascinating work. Harriet Reisen does with this biography what Alcott did with her writinggives us a memorable and inspiring gift full of humanity, heart, and soul.”Winona Ryder, producer and star of Little Women

“[Reisens] story equalsand maybe bestsher beloved book about the lively March sisters.”Lisa Shea, Elle Magazine

"Reisen delivers an in-depth portrait of the spirited, sentimental, imaginative, realistic woman whose childhood vow was to 'be rich, famous, and happy.' Reisen draws extensively from Alcott's prodigious output of literary works, travel sketches, articles, journals and letters, as well as the recollections of her contemporaries . . . Reisen deftly weaves the story of Alcott's life into the rich social, cultural and historical fabric of mid-19th-century New England. The author's insightful examination reveals Alcott as a compulsive writer who peppered her stories with external details and internal currents of her

About the Author

Harriet Reisens interest in Louisa May Alcott dates to her marathon reading of Alcotts eight childrens novels during a rainy spell one childhood summer. Over the past twenty years, what began as an idea for a film biography of Alcott developed into a passion for the subject herself. A former fellow in screenwriting at the American Film Institute, Reisen has written dramatic and historical documentary scripts for PBS and HBO, and radio commentary for Morning Edition and Marketplace. She lives in Massachusetts.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

Victoria Eastman, January 1, 2010 (view all comments by Victoria Eastman)
This book has been a wonderful Christmas gift. Usually I read mysteries but when I saw Harriet Reisen speaking about her book on television I wanted to meet Louisa May Alcott. My wish was granted and I have learned so much more about the woman who wrote to free her family from debt. I have learned about the woman who had confidence in and accepted that she had a gift for writing and who chose that gift as her spouse rather than marriage. Most surprising to learn was the relationship between Louisa and her father. Most interesting to discover was how strongly Louisa's emotions affected her life and behaviour. I am happy to have strayed from my usual reading genre to this fascinating biography.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No

Product Details

ISBN:
9780805082999
Subtitle:
The Woman Behind Little Women
Author:
Reisen, Harriet
Publisher:
Henry Holt and Co.
Subject:
Alcott, Louisa May
Subject:
Authors, American -- 19th century.
Subject:
Literary
Subject:
Women
Subject:
Biography-Literary
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Series:
John MacRae Books
Publication Date:
20091027
Binding:
Electronic book text in proprietary or open standard format
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
384
Dimensions:
9.25 x 6.13 in

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Related Subjects

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Louisa May Alcott: The Woman Behind Little Women Used Hardcover
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Product details 384 pages Henry Holt & Company - English 9780805082999 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by ,

In a fresh, modern take on the remarkable Louisa May Alcott, Harriet Reisens vivid biography explores the authors life in the context of her works, many of which are to some extent autobiographical. Although Alcott secretly wrote pulp fiction, harbored radical abolitionist views, and served as a Civil War nurse, her novels went on to sell more copies than those of Herman Melville and Henry James. Stories and details culled from Alcotts journals, together with revealing letters to family, friends, and publishers, plus recollections of her famous contemporaries provide the basis for this lively account of the authors classic rags-to-riches tale. In Louisa May Alcott, the extraordinary woman behind the beloved American classic Little Women is revealed as never before.

"Synopsis" by , A vivid, energetic account of the life of Louisa May Alcott, whose work has delighted millions of readers

Louisa May Alcott portrays a writer as worthy of interest in her own right as her most famous character, Jo March, and addresses all aspects of Alcotts life: the effect of her fathers self-indulgent utopian schemes; her familys chronic economic difficulties and frequent uprootings; her experience as a nurse in the Civil War; the loss of her health and frequent recourse to opiates in search of relief from migraines, insomnia, and symptomatic pain. Stories and details culled from Alcotts journals; her equally rich letters to family, friends, publishers, and admiring readers; and the correspondence, journals, and recollections of her family, friends, and famous contemporaries provide the basis for this lively account of the authors classic rags-to-riches tale.

Alcott would become the equivalent of a multimillionaire in her lifetime based on the astounding sales of her books, leaving contemporaries like Nathaniel Hawthorne, Herman Melville, and Henry James in the dust. This biography explores Alcotts life in the context of her works, all of which are to some extent autobiographical. A fresh, modern take on this remarkable and prolific writer, who secretly authored pulp fiction, harbored radical abolitionist views, and completed heroic service as a Civil War nurse, Louisa May Alcott is in the end also the story of how the all-time beloved American classic Little Women came to be. This revelatory portrait will present the popular author as she was and as she has never been seen before.

Harriet Reisens interest in Louisa May Alcott dates to her marathon reading of Alcotts eight childrens novels during a rainy spell one childhood summer. Over the past twenty years, what began as an idea for a film biography of Alcott developed into a passion for the subject herself. A former fellow in screenwriting at the American Film Institute, Reisen has written dramatic and historical documentary scripts for PBS and HBO, and radio commentary for Morning Edition and Marketplace. She lives in Massachusetts.

Louisa May Alcott portrays a writer as worthy of interest in her own right as her most famous character, Jo March, and addresses all aspects of Alcotts life: the effect of her fathers self-indulgent utopian schemes; her familys chronic economic difficulties and frequent uprootings; her experience as a nurse in the Civil War; the loss of her health and frequent recourse to opiates in search of relief from migraines, insomnia, and symptomatic pain. Stories and details culled from Alcotts journals; her equally rich letters to family, friends, publishers, and admiring readers; and the correspondence, journals, and recollections of her family, friends, and famous contemporaries provide the basis for this account of the authors life, a classic rags-to-riches story.

Alcott would become the equivalent of a multimillionaire in her lifetime; her books far outsold those by contemporaries like Nathaniel Hawthorne, Herman Melville, and Henry James. This biography explores Alcotts life in the context of her works, all of which are to some extent autobiographical. A modern take on this remarkable and prolific writer, who secretly authored pulp fiction, harbored radical abolitionist views, and completed heroic service as a Civil War nurse, Louisa May Alcott is also the story of how the beloved American classic Little Women came to be. This revelatory portrait presents a new perspective on the popular author.

“Every now and then, there appears a writer who has tracked a subject for so long through space and time that the resulting product ranks it superior to any of the facile interpretations or extended magazine articles that currently pass for biography. Such is the case with Harriet Reisen . . . Ms. Reisen is a master storyteller. Chapters are never formulaic. With compassion and insight, she propels readers on to the next adventure, sacrifice, tragedy and triumph.”Marion Elizabeth Rodgers, The Washington Times

“As Harriet Reisen's enchanting biography reminds us, Alcott patterned the March family on her own and Jo on herself . . . . [Her life] is richly examined in Ms. Reisen's full and vivid portrait.”Melanie Kirkpatrick, The Wall Street Journal

“There may be better American novels, but Little Women surely ranks among the most cherished. . . . Fans will adore Harriet Reisens sympathetic biography Louisa May Alcott. With charming verve, she details Alcotts remarkable if difficult life.”USA Today

“Drawing heavily on family letters and journals, Reisens intimate biography . . . is a moving and sympathetic look at the Alcotts and their extraordinary cultural mileu.”Julia M. Klein, Obit Magazine

“Harriet Reisen puts 20 years of study into a highly readable story. She casts a revealing new light upon an ambitious woman who was very much like her literary alter ego.”Joyce Saenz Harris, The Dallas Morning News

“Comprehensive and eminently readable . . . At once sweeping and personal . . . Reisens devotion both to scholarship and Alcott herself makes the book truly an interesting and engaging read.”Victoria Shouldis, Concord Monitor

“A lively, engrossing portrait of Louisa May Alcott's life that will appeal to the legions of women who grew up worshipping the book . . . [Alcotts] spirit shines through in Reisens retelling.”Meghan Barr, Associated Press

“Reisens lifelong fascination with Little Women and the woman who wrote it has produced an absorbing narrative, in many ways the best ever, of Alcotts own life . . . The utterly compelling force of Alcotts personality has never been better described. I found the book compulsively readable; I couldnt put it down.”Robert Richardson, author of Emerson: The Mind on Fire and Henry Thoreau: A Life of the Mind

“Brilliantly researched . . . Her biography will occupy an essential place on any Alcott bookshelf.”John Matteson, Pulitzer Prize-winning author of Edens Outcasts: The Story of Louisa May Alcott and Her Father

“A beautifully written, significant, and fascinating work. Harriet Reisen does with this biography what Alcott did with her writinggives us a memorable and inspiring gift full of humanity, heart, and soul.”Winona Ryder, producer and star of Little Women

“[Reisens] story equalsand maybe bestsher beloved book about the lively March sisters.”Lisa Shea, Elle Magazine

"Reisen delivers an in-depth portrait of the spirited, sentimental, imaginative, realistic woman whose childhood vow was to 'be rich, famous, and happy.' Reisen draws extensively from Alcott's prodigious output of literary works, travel sketches, articles, journals and letters, as well as the recollections of her contemporaries . . . Reisen deftly weaves the story of Alcott's life into the rich social, cultural and historical fabric of mid-19th-century New England. The author's insightful examination reveals Alcott as a compulsive writer who peppered her stories with external details and internal currents of her

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