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Divided We Fail: The Story of an African American Community That Ended the Era of School Desegregation

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Divided We Fail: The Story of an African American Community That Ended the Era of School Desegregation Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Examines why school desegregation, despite its success in closing the achievement gap, was never embraced wholeheartedly in the black community as a remedy for racial inequality

 

In 2007, a court case originally filed in Louisville, Kentucky, was argued before the Supreme Court and officially ended the era of school desegregation— both changing how schools across America handle race and undermining the most important civil rights cases of the last century. Of course, this wasn’t the first federal lawsuit to challenge school desegregation. But it was the first—and only—one brought by African Americans. In Divided We Fail, journalist Sarah Garland deftly and sensitively tells the stories of the families and individuals who fought for and against desegregation. By reframing how we commonly understand race, education, and the history of desegregation, this timely and deeply relevant book will be an important contribution to the continued struggle toward true racial equality.

 

Review:

"Garland, a staff writer at the nonprofit education-reporting Hechinger Report, offers a nuanced and thoroughly researched look at the complicated history of school desegregation in the United States through the micro lens of the 2007 Louisville, Ky., court case that officially ended the era of forced busing and racial quotas. Looking at both the individuals affected by segregation and desegregation, Garland intersperses the narrative with historical precedent and cultural analysis, creating a rich subtext from which to assess the motivations of the parents and community members who brought the lawsuit that effectively ended the reign of enforced desegregation. Though this is her first book, Garland is unafraid to grapple with hard truths and intimate portraits of the families behind the statistics. The text is organized thematically rather than chronologically, a choice that magnifies the stakes at play for the plaintiffs. Readers will find the text more informative than politically charged, left to draw their own conclusions amid a whirlwind of evidence. Agent: Robert E. Guinsler, Sterling Lord Literistic." Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Synopsis:

US

About the Author

Sarah Garland is a staff writer at the Hechinger Report. She has written for the New York Times, Washington Post, Philadelphia Inquirer, Chicago Tribune, American Prospect, New York Sun, Newsweek, Washington Monthly, Newsday, New York, and Marie Claire, among other publications. She was a 2009 recipient of the Spencer Fellowship in Education Reporting at Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism. Originally from Louisville, Kentucky, Garland now lives in Brooklyn, New York. 

Table of Contents

Preface

I. The Letters

II. Our Beloved Central High

III. With Our Own

IV. The Numbers Game

V. The Lawsuit

VI. To the Supreme Court

Epilogue

Acknowledgements

Notes

Product Details

ISBN:
9780807001776
Author:
Garland, Sarah
Publisher:
Beacon Press (MA)
Subject:
History
Subject:
Education-General
Publication Date:
20130131
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Language:
English
Pages:
256
Dimensions:
9.3 x 6.31 x 0.94 in 1.14 lb

Related Subjects

Education » General
History and Social Science » Ethnic Studies » Racism and Ethnic Conflict
History and Social Science » Law » General
History and Social Science » Law » Legal Guides and Reference
History and Social Science » World History » General

Divided We Fail: The Story of an African American Community That Ended the Era of School Desegregation Used Hardcover
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Product details 256 pages Beacon Press (MA) - English 9780807001776 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Garland, a staff writer at the nonprofit education-reporting Hechinger Report, offers a nuanced and thoroughly researched look at the complicated history of school desegregation in the United States through the micro lens of the 2007 Louisville, Ky., court case that officially ended the era of forced busing and racial quotas. Looking at both the individuals affected by segregation and desegregation, Garland intersperses the narrative with historical precedent and cultural analysis, creating a rich subtext from which to assess the motivations of the parents and community members who brought the lawsuit that effectively ended the reign of enforced desegregation. Though this is her first book, Garland is unafraid to grapple with hard truths and intimate portraits of the families behind the statistics. The text is organized thematically rather than chronologically, a choice that magnifies the stakes at play for the plaintiffs. Readers will find the text more informative than politically charged, left to draw their own conclusions amid a whirlwind of evidence. Agent: Robert E. Guinsler, Sterling Lord Literistic." Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
"Synopsis" by , US
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