The Fictioning Horror Sale
 
 

Recently Viewed clear list


Powell's Q&A | September 3, 2014

Emily St. John Mandel: IMG Powell’s Q&A: Emily St. John Mandel



Describe your latest book. My new novel is called Station Eleven. It's about a traveling Shakespearean theatre company in a post-apocalyptic North... Continue »
  1. $17.47 Sale Hardcover add to wish list

    Station Eleven

    Emily St. John Mandel 9780385353304

spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$17.95
List price: $27.00
Used Hardcover
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
Qty Store Section
1 Burnside Asia- India Modern

Behind the Beautiful Forevers: Life, Death, and Hope in a Mumbai Undercity

by

Behind the Beautiful Forevers: Life, Death, and Hope in a Mumbai Undercity Cover

ISBN13: 9781400067558
ISBN10: 1400067553
Condition: Standard
Dustjacket: Standard
All Product Details

Only 1 left in stock at $17.95!

 

 

Reading Group Guide

1. Barbara Ehrenreich calls Behind the Beautiful Forevers “one of the most powerful indictments of economic inequality I’ve ever read.” Yet the book shows the world of the Indian rich–lavish Bollywood parties, an increasingly glamorous new airport–almost exclusively through the eyes of the Annawadians. Are they resentful? Are they envious? How does the wealth that surrounds the slumdwellers shape their own expectations and hopes?

2. As Abdul works day and night with garbage, keeping his head down, trying to support his large family, some other citydwellers think of him as garbage, too. How does Abdul react to how other people view him? How would you react? How do Abdul and his sort-of friend, Sunil, try to protect themselves and sustain self-esteem in the face of other people’s contempt?

3. The lives of ordinary women– their working lives, domestic lives, and inner lives–are an important part of Behind the Beautiful Forevers. The author has noted elsewhere that she’d felt a shortage of such accounts in nonfiction about urban India. Do women like Zehrunisa and Asha have more freedom in an urban slum than they would have had in the villages where they were born? What is Meena, a Dalit, spared by living in the city? What freedoms do Meena, Asha, and Zehrunisa still lack, in your view?

4. Asha grew up in rural poverty, and the teenaged marriage arranged by her family was to a man who drank more than he worked. In Annawadi, she takes a series of calculated risks to give her daughter Manju a life far more hopeful than that of other young women such as Meena. What does Asha lose by her efforts to improve her daughter’s life chances? What does she gain? Were Asha’s choices understandable to you, in the end?

5. The author has said elsewhere that while the book brings to light serious injustices, she believes there is also hope on almost every single page: in the imaginations, intelligence and courage of the people she writes about. What are the qualities of a child like Sunil that might flourish in a society that did a better job of recognizing his capacities?

6. When we think of corruption, the examples tend to be drawn from big business or top levels of government. The kind of corruption Behind the Beautiful Forevers show us is often described as “petty”. Do you agree with that characterization of the corruption Annawadians encounter in their daily lives? Why might such corrruption be on the increase as India grows wealthier as a nation?

7. Does Asha have a point when she argues that something isn’t wrong if the powerful people say that it’s right? How does constant exposure to corruption change a person’s internal understanding of right and wrong?

8. Shortly before Abdul is sent to juvenile jail, a major newspaper runs a story about the facility headlined: “Dongri Home is a Living Hell.” Abdul’s experience of Dongri is more complex, though. How does being wrenched away from his work responsibilities at Annawadi change his understandings of the hardships of other people? Are terms like liberty and freedom understood differently by people who live in different conditions?

9. Fatima’s neighbors view her whorling rages, like her bright lipsticks, as free comic entertainments. How has her personality been shaped by the fact that she has been defined since birth by her disability–very literally named by it? Zehrunusa waivers between sympathy for and disapproval of her difficult neighbor. In the end, did you?

10. Zehrunisa remembers a time when every slumdweller was roughly equal in his or her misery, and competition between neighbors didn’t get so out of hand. Abdul doesn’t know whether or not to believe her account of a gentler past. Do you believe it? Might increased hopes for a better life have a dark as well as a bright side?

11. Many Annawadians–Hindu, Muslim, and Christian– spend less time in religious observance than they did when they were younger, and a pink temple on the edge of the sewage lake goes largely unused. In a time of relative hope and constant improvisation for the slumdwellers, why might religious practice be diminishing? What role does religious faith still play in the slumdwellers’ lives?

12. Who do you think had the best life in the book, and why?

13. In the Author’s Note Katherine Boo emphasizes the volatility of an age in which capital moves quickly around the planet, government supports decline, and temporary work proliferates. Had the author followed the families of Annawadi for only a few weeks or months, would you have come away with a different understanding of the effects of that volatility? Does uncertainty about their homes and incomes change how Annawadians view their neighbors? Does economic uncertainty affect relationships where you live?

14. At one point in the book, Abdul takes to heart the moral of a Hindu myth related by The Master: Allow your flesh to be eaten by the eagles of the world. Suffer nobly, and you’ll be rewarded in the end. What is the connection between suffering and redemption in this book? What connections between suffering and redemption do you see in your own life? Are the sufferers ennobled? Are the good rewarded in the end?

What Our Readers Are Saying

Add a comment for a chance to win!
Average customer rating based on 10 comments:

Leslie Wellstein, January 30, 2013 (view all comments by Leslie Wellstein)
This is an excellent non-fiction book about life in a Mumbai slum which reads like a novel.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
ggoodrick, January 3, 2013 (view all comments by ggoodrick)
This is the kind of book that once read, you will never forget. Yes it is heartbreaking but as others have commented, there is a hopefulness here too. It is a good reality check for those of us who sometimes bemoan our problems and inconveniences.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
cherylfb, January 1, 2013 (view all comments by cherylfb)
As someone who has read a fair amount of Indian fiction, watched her share of Indian films, works closely with many Indian co-workers both onshore and offshore I was very intrigued by Behind the Beautiful Forevers. It did not disappoint. It reads much more like a novel than non-fiction, almost as much as the amazing Random Family by Adrian Nicole LeBlanc. The power of this book is in it's ability to take a "small" story about a group of people living in the Annawadi slum of Mumbai, in close proximity to luxury hotels and the international airport and have it touch on so many larger societal and global issues while remaining a "simple" compelling narrative about a group of interconnected neighbors. The portrayals of the main set of Annawadi residents are so beautifully drawn. Even the slumlord Asha who could be despicable to others, is depicted with sensitivity and fairness. One of the most amazing things to me about the book is that while many of the stories and incidents are unbearably sad, there is a core of hope within most of the individuals.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
View all 10 comments

Product Details

ISBN:
9781400067558
Subtitle:
Life, Death, and Hope in a Mumbai Undercity
Author:
Boo, Katherine
Publisher:
Random House
Subject:
Politics - General
Subject:
Sociology-Developing Countries
Copyright:
Publication Date:
20120231
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Grade Level:
A.&rdquo;<br>&mdash;<i>Entertainment Weekly</i><br
Language:
English
Pages:
288
Dimensions:
9.5 x 6.5 x 1.24 in 1.3 lb

Other books you might like

  1. Woods Runner Used Book Club Paperback $2.95
  2. The Presumption of Guilt: The Arrest... New Trade Paper $16.00
  3. The Castrato and His Wife Sale Trade Paper $9.50
  4. My Teenage Werewolf: A Mother, a...
    Used Trade Paper $7.95
  5. Overthrowing Heaven Used Hardcover $6.95

Related Subjects


Featured Titles » Award Winners
Featured Titles » Biography
Featured Titles » General
Featured Titles » History and Social Science
Featured Titles » New Arrivals
Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z
History and Social Science » Asia » India » Ancient and General
History and Social Science » Asia » India » Modern
History and Social Science » Current Affairs » General
History and Social Science » Politics » General
History and Social Science » Sale Books
History and Social Science » Social Science » Developing Countries
History and Social Science » Sociology » Poverty
History and Social Science » Sociology » Urban Studies » General
History and Social Science » World History » General
History and Social Science » World History » India
Languages » ESL » General
Science and Mathematics » Nature Studies » General

Behind the Beautiful Forevers: Life, Death, and Hope in a Mumbai Undercity Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$17.95 In Stock
Product details 288 pages Random House - English 9781400067558 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "A Mumbai slum offers rare insight into the lives and socioeconomic and political realities for some of the disadvantaged riding the coattails (or not) of India's economic miracle in this deeply researched and brilliantly written account by New Yorker writer and Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Boo. Divided into four parts, the narrative brings vividly to the page life as it is led today in Annawadi, a squalid and overcrowded migrant settlement of some 3,000 people squatting since 1991 on a half-acre of land owned by the Sahar International Airport. (Boo derives her title from a richly ironic real-world image: a brightly colored ad for floor tiles repeating 'Beautiful Forever' across a wall shutting out Annawadi from the view of travelers leaving the airport.) Among her subjects is the fascinating Abdul, a sensitive and cautiously hopeful Muslim teenager tirelessly trading in the trash paid for by recycling firms. Crucially, Boo's commanding ability to convey an interior world comes balanced by concern for the structural realities of India's economic liberalization (begun the same year as Annawadi's settlement), and her account excels at integrating the party politics and policy strategies behind eruptions of deep-seated religious, caste, and gender divides. Boo's rigorous inquiry and transcendent prose leave an indelible impression of human beings behind the shibboleths of the New India." Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
"Review" by , "There is a lot to like about this book: the prodigious research that it is built on, distilled so expertly that we hardly notice how much we are being taught; the graceful and vivid prose that never calls attention to itself; and above all, the true and moving renderings of the people of the Mumbai slum called Annawadi. Garbage pickers and petty thieves, victims of gruesome injustice — Ms. Boo draws us into their lives, and they do not let us go. This is a superb book."
"Review" by , "Kate Boo's reporting is a form of kinship. Abdul and Manju and Kalu of Annawadi will not be forgotten. She leads us through their unknown world, her gift of language rising up like a delicate string of necessary lights. There are books that change the way you feel and see; this is one of them. If we receive the fiery spirit from which it was written, it ought to change much more than that."
"Review" by , "I couldn't put Behind the Beautiful Forevers down even when I wanted to — when the misery, abuse and filth that Boo so elegantly and understatedly describes became almost overwhelming. Her book, situated in a slum on the edge of Mumbai's international airport, is one of the most powerful indictments of economic inequality I've ever read. If Bollywood ever decides to do its own version of The Wire, this would be it."
"Review" by , "It might surprise you how completely enjoyable this book is, as rich and beautifully written as a novel. In the hierarchy of long form reporting, Katherine Boo is right up there."
"Review" by , "Deeply researched and brilliantly written... Boo's rigorous inquiry and transcendent prose leave an indelible impression of human beings behind the shibboleths of the New India."
"Review" by , "Boo creates an intimate, unforgettable portrait of India's urban poor... Boo brilliantly brings to life the residents of Annawadi, allowing the reader to know them and admire the fierce intelligence that allows them to survive in a world not made for them. The best book yet written on India in the throes of a brutal transition."
"Review" by , "[An] exquisitely accomplished first book. Novelists dream of defining characters this swiftly and beautifully, but Ms. Boo is not a novelist. She is one of those rare, deep-digging journalists who can make truth surpass fiction, a documentarian with a superb sense of human drama. She makes it very easy to forget that this book is the work of a reporter....Comparison to Dickens is not unwarranted."
"Review" by , "A jaw-dropping achievement, an instant classic of narrative nonfiction...With a cinematic intensity....Boo transcends and subverts every cliché, cynical or earnest, that we harbor about Indian destitution and gazes directly into the hearts, hopes, and human promise of vibrant people whom you'll not soon forget."
spacer
spacer
  • back to top
Follow us on...




Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.