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1 Burnside Military- World War II

This title in other editions

On American Soil: How Justice Became a Casualty of World War II

by

On American Soil: How Justice Became a Casualty of World War II Cover

 

Staff Pick

Returning to a forgotten incident in local WW II history, Jack Hamann reintroduces the story of a horrible injustice influenced by the racial prejudices of the American prosecution. Skillfully told, this gripping work of military history couldn't come at a better time. The dubious treatment of POWs in the present makes this book exceptionally relevant today.
Recommended by Michal D., Powells.com

Returning to a forgotten incident in local WWII history, Jack Hamann reintroduces the story of a horrible injustice influenced by the racial prejudices of the American prosecution. Skillfully told, this gripping work of military history couldn?t come at a better time. The dubious treatment of POWs in the present makes this book exceptionally relevant today.
Recommended by Michal D., Powells.com

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

On a hot August night in 1944, a soldier's body was discovered hanging by a rope from a cable spanning an obstacle course at Seattle's Fort Lawton. The body was identified as Private Guglielmo Olivotto, one of the thousands of Italian prisoners of war captured and brought to America.

The murder stunned the nation and the international community. Under pressure to respond quickly, the War Department convened a criminal trial at the fort, charging three African American soldiers with the lynching and first-degree murder of Private Olivotto. Forty other soldiers were charged with rioting, accused of storming the Italian barracks on the night of the murder. All forty-three soldiers were black. There was no evidence implicating any of these men. Leon Jaworski, later the lead prosecuter at the Watergate trial, was appointed to prosecute the case and seek the death penalty for three men who were most assuredly innocent.

Through his access to previously classified documents and the information gained from extensive interviews, journalist Jack Hamann tells the whole story behind World War II's largest army court-martial — a story that raises important questions about how justice is carried out when a country is at war.

Review:

"An explosive but forgotten WWII incident that took place on native ground is unearthed by former NewsHour Seattle bureau chief Hamann. In August 1944, the Seattle area played host to Italian POWs on parole and to African-American GIs recently returned from overseas or waiting to ship out. The Italians had freedom of movement and received hospitality in Seattle homes; the African-Americans were subject to massive discrimination and restrictions. The resulting tension led to escalating scuffles, which in turn led to a riotous assault by the GIs on the Italians' quarters and to the death of one Italian. Forty-three GIs faced court-martial; three faced hanging. Hamann shows a then-unknown Leon Jaworski, nearly 30 years before Watergate, using his prosecutorial skills to the fullest, leaning on prejudices in order to make a case for murder. The lead defense attorney, Maj. William Beeks, cleared one third of the defendants (against whom Jaworski had marshalled only 'hearsay and innuendo'); the rest were court-martialed, some with imprisonment — but no one was hanged. Hamann reconstructs the courtroom scenes admirably and gives shape to the riot itself. He is best in depicting the men involved and the waste of lives that the episode entailed. Agent, Michelle Tessler at Carlisle & Company." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"The story line that Hamann uncovers is compelling enough. But it is the crime's historical context...that makes the book so relevant now." Booklist

Review:

"Hamann does an excellent job of humanizing the two opposing lawyers in the case....A welcome piece of military history, adroitly balancing racism and legal questions in one story." Kirkus Reviews

Review:

"Not only riveting, On American Soil is also essential reading for anyone concerned about the delicate balance between national security and individual rights. Jack Hamann proves that a true tale well told can be as gripping as fiction." James Bradley, author of Flags of Our Fathers and Flyboys

Synopsis:

The untold story of the largest army court-martial of World War II.

Synopsis:

Through his access to previously classified documents and information gained from extensive interviews, journalist Hamann tells the story behind World War II's largest army court-martial, where three African-American soldiers were charged with the lynching and murder of an Italian prisoner of war.

Synopsis:

In August 1944, one of the largest staging areas for American soldiers headed to the Pacific was Fort Lawton, an army base in Seattle. The army was segregated then, and the barracks housing the African American troops were isolated from the rest of the fort. Just yards away stood the barracks of a compnay of Italian prisoners of war, also segregated. The violent death of one of these prisoners launched the largest and longest army court-martial of World War II. The events surrounding this extraordinary trial—all but buried for more than a half century—are now recounted in this harrowing story of race, privilege, and power.

About the Author

Jack Hamann has been a news reporter, network correspondent, and documentary producer for more than two decades and was most recently the Seattle bureau chief for The NewsHour with Jim Lehrer. A veteran of PBS, CNN, and NBC, Hamann has won ten Emmy Awards for his work. He lives in Seattle with his wife. This is his first book.

Product Details

ISBN:
9781565123946
Subtitle:
How Justice Became a Casualty of World War II
Author:
Hamann, Jack
Publisher:
Algonquin Books
Subject:
Military - World War II
Subject:
World war, 1939-1945
Subject:
History
Subject:
Military - United States
Subject:
Legal History
Subject:
United States - 20th Century/WWII
Subject:
Prisoners of war
Subject:
United States - State & Local - Pacific Northwest
Subject:
History - United States/20th Century
Subject:
Trials (Murder) -- Washington (State)
Subject:
Trials (Riots) - Washington (State) - Seattle
Subject:
Military-World War II General
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Hardback
Publication Date:
April 29, 2005
Binding:
Hardback
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
368
Dimensions:
9.26x6.36x1.33 in. 1.50 lbs.

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Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Military » World War II » General
History and Social Science » US History » 20th Century » General
History and Social Science » World History » General

On American Soil: How Justice Became a Casualty of World War II Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$4.95 In Stock
Product details 368 pages Algonquin Books of Chapel Hill - English 9781565123946 Reviews:
"Staff Pick" by ,

Returning to a forgotten incident in local WW II history, Jack Hamann reintroduces the story of a horrible injustice influenced by the racial prejudices of the American prosecution. Skillfully told, this gripping work of military history couldn't come at a better time. The dubious treatment of POWs in the present makes this book exceptionally relevant today.

"Staff Pick" by ,

Returning to a forgotten incident in local WWII history, Jack Hamann reintroduces the story of a horrible injustice influenced by the racial prejudices of the American prosecution. Skillfully told, this gripping work of military history couldn?t come at a better time. The dubious treatment of POWs in the present makes this book exceptionally relevant today.

"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "An explosive but forgotten WWII incident that took place on native ground is unearthed by former NewsHour Seattle bureau chief Hamann. In August 1944, the Seattle area played host to Italian POWs on parole and to African-American GIs recently returned from overseas or waiting to ship out. The Italians had freedom of movement and received hospitality in Seattle homes; the African-Americans were subject to massive discrimination and restrictions. The resulting tension led to escalating scuffles, which in turn led to a riotous assault by the GIs on the Italians' quarters and to the death of one Italian. Forty-three GIs faced court-martial; three faced hanging. Hamann shows a then-unknown Leon Jaworski, nearly 30 years before Watergate, using his prosecutorial skills to the fullest, leaning on prejudices in order to make a case for murder. The lead defense attorney, Maj. William Beeks, cleared one third of the defendants (against whom Jaworski had marshalled only 'hearsay and innuendo'); the rest were court-martialed, some with imprisonment — but no one was hanged. Hamann reconstructs the courtroom scenes admirably and gives shape to the riot itself. He is best in depicting the men involved and the waste of lives that the episode entailed. Agent, Michelle Tessler at Carlisle & Company." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review" by , "The story line that Hamann uncovers is compelling enough. But it is the crime's historical context...that makes the book so relevant now."
"Review" by , "Hamann does an excellent job of humanizing the two opposing lawyers in the case....A welcome piece of military history, adroitly balancing racism and legal questions in one story."
"Review" by , "Not only riveting, On American Soil is also essential reading for anyone concerned about the delicate balance between national security and individual rights. Jack Hamann proves that a true tale well told can be as gripping as fiction." James Bradley, author of Flags of Our Fathers and Flyboys
"Synopsis" by , The untold story of the largest army court-martial of World War II.
"Synopsis" by , Through his access to previously classified documents and information gained from extensive interviews, journalist Hamann tells the story behind World War II's largest army court-martial, where three African-American soldiers were charged with the lynching and murder of an Italian prisoner of war.
"Synopsis" by ,
In August 1944, one of the largest staging areas for American soldiers headed to the Pacific was Fort Lawton, an army base in Seattle. The army was segregated then, and the barracks housing the African American troops were isolated from the rest of the fort. Just yards away stood the barracks of a compnay of Italian prisoners of war, also segregated. The violent death of one of these prisoners launched the largest and longest army court-martial of World War II. The events surrounding this extraordinary trial—all but buried for more than a half century—are now recounted in this harrowing story of race, privilege, and power.
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