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1 Beaverton Children's Young Adult- General

Acceleration

by

Acceleration Cover

ISBN13: 9780440238362
ISBN10: 0440238366
Condition: Standard
All Product Details

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Excerpt

One

This is a nightmare.

Working at the Toronto Transit Commission's lost and found. Nine to five. Monday to Friday. A little slice of death, one day at a time.

For me it's a two-month sentence, July and August. I would have been happy bumming around till September, but Dad called in a favor to get me in here. And at least I don't have to wear a uniform like my bud Wayne over at the Dairy Barn. Wayne's planning to torch the thing on Labor Day (the uniform, not the Barn) before we head back for our last year of high school.

So I'm here under protest, a political prisoner of the capitalist overlord otherwise known as Dad.

Here's the one-minute tour of the place. First, to get here you have to come to Bay subway station and take the service elevator down to the subbasement. At the end of the hall to your left you'll find the door marked lost and found. Jacob, my supervisor, sits at the front counter cataloguing the lost junk that comes in from the buses and subways in the transit system. If you think of a half-deflated soccer ball with two of the hairiest ears you've ever seen attached to it, you've got a good picture of Jacob. Past the counter there's a maze of stacks holding row after row, shelf after dusty shelf of lost stuff.

I'm trying on a black leather jacket in the stacks when the bell at the counter dings. The jacket's term expires in a week, so it'll soon be appearing in my closet as part of the Duncan collection. One ding of the bell means Jacob needs me to search for something. Two dings means hurry up. Three dings--things get ugly.

When I get to the counter, Jacob's asking an old woman about the weather up on the surface. Spending eight hours a day in this dungeon, you tend to forget that the sun is still shining up there.

"They say it's going to hit a hundred and three today," the woman tells him. "Not a cloud in the sky."

It's been six weeks with no rain. Major heat wave. But down here you'd never know. The city could be bombed to ashes and we'd still be here sorting through the piles.

"Duncan, we're looking for a pair of glasses," Jacob tells me. "Silver frames. Bifocals."

I sigh. "Right. This might take a while."

Eyeglasses rank in the top four on the list of most often lost items, right up there with umbrellas, cell phones, and books.

I'm the runner, the one who does the actual searching. Jacob does the actual sitting.

I don't know who did this job before me--don't know if anybody did it before me--but the place is a mess. The way it works, stuff gets held here for three months. Everything's got a Post-it with an expiration date. Anything unclaimed gets boxed up for the quarterly sale down at the YMCA. But if you poke around, you'll find stuff that's been here for two years or more. I pulled a college sweater off the top shelf the other day, and the dust coming off it drifted down like snow.

Lost junk is organized in sections. All the jackets are together, including my black leather beauty. Dozens of umbrellas are heaped in a pile, enough rain protection to keep every last flea on Noah's ark dry. There's a library of forgotten books overflowing the packed shelves. And there are two boxes of eyeglasses, separated into sunglasses and regular. I dig in.

There's an amazing variety, everything from prescription swimming goggles to your basic thick-black-framed geek glasses to your old-lady specials with the necklace holders attached to the arms. I find a pair that fits the lady's description--bifocals, silver frames. Holding them up to peer through the lenses, I see they've got enough magnifying power to count the hairs on a mosquito's butt.

"That's them," the old woman says after trying them on.

Jacob makes her sign the claims book, as if the glasses are worth more than the dollar they'd get at the Y sale.

"I'm lost without these," she tells us. "I'm so blind without them, I didn't realize until I was halfway here that I'd put hand lotion on my face instead of sunscreen. I can already feel a burn starting up."

Jacob nods. "Yeah. With the holes in the ozone and global warming, the sun's not as friendly as it used to be."

The woman shivers, pulling her jacket closed. "Well, it's certainly cool down here."

"We're about fifty feet underground--deeper than the subway tunnels--so the temperature stays a constant cool year-round. This must be what it feels like to be buried alive." That's Jacob's idea of funny. I think he's been down here too long.

The woman gives him a nervous look and mumbles her thanks as she makes for the door.

"You've really got a way with the ladies," I say when she's gone.

No response.

I fill a paper cup at the cooler, leaning on it as it gurgles to itself, and watch the clock crawl toward eternity. Jacob goes back to reading the newspaper.

Past him, there's a glass case on the wall that once held a fire axe but now has an artificial leg standing inside. That leg is like the official mascot of all the forgotten junk in the lost and found. There's a worn-down blue men's Puma running shoe on its foot, and it's obviously been well used. It always gets me wondering--how do you lose something like that? I mean, didn't the guy notice something was missing when he went hopping off the subway--that the world was bouncing up and down more than usual? What happened, that he never came back to claim it? Jacob says the thing's been here for three years.

From the Hardcover edition.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 2 comments:

Beverly B, April 30, 2013 (view all comments by Beverly B)
Acceleration has a perfect setting for a suspenseful, creepy mystery - the NYC subway system lost and found. At first, 17 year old Duncan found peace in the loneliness and tedious tasks of his his job as a clerk in the lost and found, but after several weeks, he is so bored he is ready to quit until he stumbles upon a personal journal. Duncan starts to read the journal and as the entries become more threatening, Duncan realizes the writer is using the journal to plan out how to become a serial killer. When the police refuse to take him seriously, Duncan decides he and best bud, Vinny, will find the journal's owner and get proof for the police. Duncan and Vinny are that strange combination of awkward and arrogant, wise and foolish, snarky and empathetic, that is common among teen boys. Duncan's motives may be honorable, but in his eagerness, he sets himself up for a terrifying experience.
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Anne Schmidt, January 4, 2010 (view all comments by Anne Schmidt)
My all time favorite book for boys or girls would be "Acceleration" by Graham McNamee. This YA book is a sure winner for all readers even those who are reluctant to pick up a novel. The author has done a great job of drawing in the reader from the very start. You will read about 17 year old Duncan who while at work in the lost and found department of the Toronto transit station Duncan finds a diary that belongs to a serial killer. Read how Duncan tries to do the right thing, stop the killer before it can happen again. Readers alike will have a hard time putting down as the suspense and it will keep you connected right up until the very end. Great Read for One and All.
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Product Details

ISBN:
9780440238362
Author:
Mcnamee, Graham
Publisher:
Amulet Books
Author:
Skilton, Sarah
Author:
McNamee, Graham
Author:
Phillips, Suzanne
Subject:
Mysteries, Espionage, & Detective Stories
Subject:
Mystery and detective stories
Subject:
Children's 12-Up - Fiction - Mystery
Subject:
Summer employment
Subject:
Canada
Subject:
Serial murderers
Subject:
Mysteries & Detective Stories
Subject:
Children s Middle Readers-General
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Hardcover w/Dust Jacket
Publication Date:
20140415
Binding:
Electronic book text in proprietary or open standard format
Grade Level:
from 7
Language:
English
Pages:
272
Dimensions:
8.25 x 5.5 x 1 in
Age Level:
12-17

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Related Subjects


Children's » General
Children's » Middle Readers » General
Young Adult » General

Acceleration Used Mass Market
0 stars - 0 reviews
$3.50 In Stock
Product details 272 pages Laurel-Leaf Books - English 9780440238362 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "A teen discovers a diary in which the writer plots a murder, so he enlists his friends to help him catch the would-be murderer. In a starred review, PW said this 'taut novel reads like a fast-paced nail-biter of a movie.' Ages 12-up. (June)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Synopsis" by ,
The Bourne Identity meets I Am the Cheese in this taut thriller

Even though Micah's a star pitcher, his older sister Lindsey is the real deal--a runner so good, she has a shot at the Olympics. The two of them urge each other on, and are each other's best support. Then the unthinkable happens: Lindsey is murdered, and Micah may have been the last person to see her. But he can't remember what happened, no matter what their parents tell him, no matter what the police say. Did he witness his sister's murder--or commit it? Can he recall the truth before his life is sentenced to end, too?

"Synopsis" by , Its a hot, hot summer, and in the depths of the Toronto Transit Authoritys Lost and Found, 17-year-old Duncan is cataloging lost things and sifting through accumulated junk. And between Jacob, the cranky old man who runs the place, and the endless dusty boxes overflowing with stuff no one will ever claim, Duncans just about had enough. Then he finds a little leather book. Its a diary filled with the dark and dirty secrets of a twisted mind, a serial killer stalking his prey in the subway. And Duncan cant make himself stop reading.

What would you do with a book like that? How far would you go to catch a madman?

And what if time was running out. . . .

From the Hardcover edition.

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