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3 Remote Warehouse World History- Japan

This title in other editions

Samurai William: The Englishman Who Opened Japan

by

Samurai William: The Englishman Who Opened Japan Cover

ISBN13: 9780142003787
ISBN10: 0142003786
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Excerpt

Prologue

They had reached the end of the world. A tremendous storm had pushed them deep into the unknown, where the maps and globes showed only monsters of the deep. The night sky sparkled, but the unfamiliar stars had proved a mischievous guide to these lost and lonely adventurers.

For almost two years, William Adams and his crew had braved wild and tempestuous oceans. They had clashed with spear-toting island chieftains, and suffered from sickness and empty bellies. Now, on April 12, 1600, these few survivors had once again sighted land, where they expected death at the hands of barbarous savages.

The bell of the great Manju-ji monastery clanged at dawn. As the weak spring sunlight spilled over the southern mountains, a dozen temples seemed to echo in reply. It was already light on the watery delta of the Oita River, but night still lingered in the palaces and pagodas of Funai. Their cuneiform roofs trapped the shadows. It would be several hours before daylight pierced the gridlike maze of walkways.

The strange vessel that was drifting helplessly into the harbor was in a terrible state of repair. Her sails were in shreds and her timbers had been bleached by the sun. With her stately poop and mullioned prow, she was quite unlike the junks that occasionally dropped anchor on the southern shores of Japan. No sooner had she been sighted than the alarm was raised and a small party of townsmen rowed out to view the vessel. Those who clambered aboard were greeted by a pitiful sight. A dozen adventurers lay helpless and groaning in their own filth. Many were covered in blotches — a sign of advanced scurvy — while others had been stricken with terrible tropical diseases. Their victuals had run out long ago and they had subsisted on the rats and other vermin that scavenged for scraps in the filthy swill in the hold of the vessel. Only William Adams was sufficiently coherent to greet the boarding party. He blinked in astonishment as he caught his first glimpse of a civilization that was older — and perhaps more sophisticated — than his own.

Adams immediately realized that these men had come not to their rescue, but to pillage the ship. He could only hope that he and his men would receive a welcome on shore. They had achieved the remarkable feat of crossing both the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, negotiating the treacherous Magellan Straits en route. They had survived Antarctic blizzards and tropical storms, and had watched in horror as their friends and fellow crewmates had weakened and expired. Of a fleet of five ships, only one had made it to Japan. Of an estimated one hundred crew members, just twenty-four men were still alive. Of these, six were on the verge of death.

After more than nineteen months at sea, Adams had reached the fabled island of Japan, where no Englishman had ever before set foot. As he stepped ashore, he prayed that his voyage of discovery had at long last come to an end. In fact, it was just about to begin.

The adventurers of Elizabethan London knew almost nothing about Japan. When they unrolled their maps and gazed at the remote East, they saw only squiggles, dots, and grotesque sea monsters. Gerardus Mercator's 1569 map of the world depicted this kingdom as a lozenge-shaped blob with two tentacles of islands. Edward Wright's projection was little better. When he came to draw Japan, he delved deep into his imagination and came up with an island that looked like a misshapen prawn with a long fluffy beard. Although he took great pride in labeling his map "a true hydrographical description," he admitted that he had only accurately drawn "so much of the world as hath been hitherto discovered." That — alas — did not include Japan.

The Bookish gentlemen elsewhere in northern Europe were equally ignorant as to the whereabouts, and people, of Japan. In the Low Countries, France, and the Holy Roman Empire the only information about this mysterious "kingdom" was to be found in the account of the great Venetian traveler Marco Polo. That was already three centuries old and was based on nothing more than hearsay. Polo himself had never been to Japan — a land he called Chipangu — but he had learned from the Chinese that the "people are white, civilised and well-favoured" and he noted that they were ferociously proud and "dependent on nobody." He added that no one — not even their neighbors the Chinese — dared to sail to Japan, for the distances were enormous and the dangers were great.

Forbidden kingdoms made for rich kingdoms in the minds of gentlemen adventurers, and distant Japan — the Land of the Rising Sun — was believed to glisten with gilded splendor. "The quantity of gold they have here is endless," wrote an excited Polo, "for they find it in their own islands." The emperor's palace was "entirely roofed with fine gold:' while the windows glittered and twinkled, "so that altogether the richness of the palace is past all bounds and all belief."

Dozens of English adventurers were lured into uncharted seas by such tantalizing riches, placing their trust in the good Lord and a fair breeze. They studied their maps, consulted their charts, and concluded — quite logically — that the frosty Arctic Ocean offered the shortest route to the East. They little imagined that their fragile galleons would be battered by monstrous icebergs and translucent cliffs of ice. Sir Hugh Willoughby's 1553 expedition to the East had been the most spectacular failure. His vessel had been. trapped in the icy jaws of the White Sea, to the north of Muscovy, and his men had frozen to death in an Arctic blizzard.

The Northwest Passage across the top of North America was believed to offer an even shorter route to Japan and China. But it, too, had displayed a voracious appetite for Elizabethan sea dogs. The route, wrote the Arctic adventurer George Beste, was so "freezing cold [that] not only men's bodies, but also the very lines and tackling are frozen." The seas were choked with ice even in midsummer, for tremendous storms would crack the polar ice cap and fling mountainous cliffs into the paths of their wooden vessels. "The ice enclosed us," wrote the mariner on one expedition, "that we could see neither land nor sea."

George Beste urged his countrymen on in their endeavors to reach the East, encouraging them with the lure of unimaginable wealth: "Whole worldes offer and reach out themselves to them that will first vouchsafe to possess, inhabit and till them." The riches of the world were there for the taking in the sixteenth century, and there were vast tracts of ocean that had never been crossed. "Yea, there are countreys yet remaining without masters and possessors, which are fertile to bring forth all manner of corne and grayne." Beste might have displayed slightly less enthusiasm had he known the perils of tropical seas. Elizabethan galleons were frail and entirely dependent on the whim of the winds and the swirl of the currents. There were no charts of the shoals and sand-banks of the East China Sea, and the mysterious island of Japan was said to be surrounded by unpredictable storms that swallowed ships with one watery gulp.

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Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

Hairica, July 27, 2009 (view all comments by Hairica)
An interesting history, but not what I expected. Many of the letters written by Williams have been lost or destroyed, so there is little of his perspective in the text. However, Richard Cocks, a different Englishman living in Japan, wrote prolifically and included many personal and humorous details. Based on the accounts of Cocks and other merchants, the book gives enough historical details to make the plight of the Englishmen compelling. Descriptions of Japan and its culture effectively explained the inevitable clash with the rowdy mariners, but the pace of the story kind of plods and fizzles. The sense of imminent danger was never present. Still, the accounts of the magnificent palace in Osaka have me dreaming of a Japanese vacation.
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Product Details

ISBN:
9780142003787
Author:
Milton, Giles
Publisher:
Penguin Books
Location:
New York
Subject:
Great britain
Subject:
Historical - British
Subject:
Adventurers & Explorers
Subject:
Asia - Japan
Subject:
Japan
Subject:
British
Subject:
Pilots and pilotage
Subject:
British -- Japan.
Subject:
Adams, William
Subject:
Biography-Historical
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Mass Market
Series Volume:
no. 97/133
Publication Date:
20031231
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
from 12
Language:
English
Illustrations:
b/w illustrations throughout
Pages:
368
Dimensions:
7.76x5.06x.67 in. .55 lbs.
Age Level:
from 18

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Related Subjects

Biography » General
Biography » Historical
History and Social Science » Asia » Japan » Ancient and Tokugawa to 1868
History and Social Science » World History » 1650 to Present
History and Social Science » World History » Japan
Travel » Travel Writing » Asia
Travel » Travel Writing » General

Samurai William: The Englishman Who Opened Japan Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$16.00 In Stock
Product details 368 pages Penguin Books - English 9780142003787 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , With all the adventure and bloodcurdling battle scenes of his earlier book, "Nathaniel's Nutmeg," an acclaimed historian dazzles readers with the true story of William Adams, the first Englishman to set foot in Japan (and the inspiration for James Clavell's bestselling novel "Shogun").

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