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Best New American Voices 2008 (Best New American Voices)

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Best New American Voices 2008 (Best New American Voices) Cover

ISBN13: 9780156031493
ISBN10: 0156031493
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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Critically acclaimed novelist and short story writer Richard Bausch continues the tradition of identifying the best young writers on the cusp of their careers in this year's volume of Best New American Voices. Here are stories culled from hundreds of writing programs such as the Iowa Writers' Workshop and Johns Hopkins and from summer conferences such as Sewanee and Bread Loaf — as well as a complete list of contact information for these programs. This collection showcases tomorrow's literary stars: Julie Orringer, Adam Johnson, William Gay, David Benioff, Rattawut Lapcharoensap, Maile Meloy, Amanda Davis, Jennifer Vanderbes, and John Murray are just some of the acclaimed authors whose early work has appeared in this series since its launch in 2000. The best new American voices are heard here first.

Review:

"Each year the nation's most driven would-be writers seek out the structure and support of the many creative writing MFA programs and-as this volume proves-produce inspired work under their auspices. Now in its eighth year, this series showcases stories nominated by workshop directors and instructors and selected, in this case, by guest editor Bausch (Thanksgiving Night). A number of the writers featured in this edition breathe new life into familiar themes-the University of Iowa's Leslie Jamison takes on heartbreak, Stanford's Suzanne Rivecca examines sexual abuse, University of Massachusetts, Amherst's Jedediah Berry looks at death, Elizabeth Kadetsky represents the Wesleyan Writers Conference with a tale of innocence lost, and Adam Stumacher of the Wisconsin Institute takes on political strife-but just as many craft deftly original stories that defy easy categorization; one standout example is a playful story from the University of Mississippi's Christopher Stokes, 'The Man Who Ate Michael Rockefellar,' set in colonial Indonesia and narrated by a shrewd native. In his introduction, guest editor Bausch says that literature's ongoing quest is 'to make something lasting out of the confusions of living'; these imaginative debut artists offer happy proof that the challenge is still being met." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Synopsis:

This year's volume, featuring 17 new stories selected by award-winning novelist John Casey, continues the tradition of identifying the best young writers on the cusp of their careers.

About the Author

Richard Bausch is the author of many critically acclaimed novels and collections of short stories, including, most recently, Thanksgiving Night. In 2004 he won the PEN/Malamud Award for Excellence in the Short Story.

John Kulka is a senior editor at Yale University Press.

Natalie Danford is a novelist and book critic.

Table of Contents

Contents
Preface ix
Introduction by Richard Bauschxiii

Alice by Tucker Capps 1
Inheritance by Jedediah Berry 42
Uncle by Suzanne Rivecca 58
The Man Who Ate Michael Rockefeller by Christopher Stokes 78
Quiet Men by Leslie Jamison 97
Early Humans by Garth Risk Hallberg 131
Horizon by Peter Mountford 160
Surfacing by Lauren Groff 176
Headlock by Dan Pinkerton 204
Mouse by Jordan McMullin 225
Alms by Razia Sultana Khan 243
Men More Than Mortal by Elizabeth Kadetsky 257
Men and Boys by Oriane Gabrielle Delfosse 277
The Wizard of Khao-I-Dang by Sharon May 301
Venn Diagram by David James Poissant 321
The Neon Desert by Adam Stumacher 338
No One Here Says What They Mean by Stefan McKinstray 363

Contributors 393
Participants 397

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

Junepark77, October 1, 2007 (view all comments by Junepark77)
review.................

Kirkus Reviews

A lively range of "startlingly original voices, and vivid, sophisticated sensibilities" is displayed in the latest installment of this always welcome annual. As this year's editor, short-story writer Bausch explains, the nation's writing workshops continue to provide crucibles for impressively varied developing talents. Evidence abounds in the volume's first two stories: a richly imagined realistic narrative in which a morose widower's tense relationship with his adult daughter is complicated, and paradoxically enriched, by the death of their family's beloved pet dog (Tucker Capps's "Alice"); and a mordant, gripping fantasy (Jedediah Berry's "Inheritance") about a suburban husband obliged to deal with his macho father's "legacy": a hirsute "beast" discovered in his cellar, which excites his neighbors' fears and his wife's protective fascination. The other 15 stories trace a widening arc, from chronicles of adolescent and young-adult longing and bafflement (Jordan McMullin's "Mouse"; Oriane Gabrielle Delfosse's "Men and Boys"; Stefan McKinstray's "No One Here Says What They Mean"), to compact bildungsromans set in such distant locales as Bangladesh (Razia Sultana Khan's ironic "Alms"), Cambodia (Sharon May's "The Wizard of Kao-I-Dang") and Israel's West Bank (Adam Stumacher's marvelous "The Neon Desert"). Though several stories feel formulaic or strained (notably, Christopher Stokes's very odd "The Man Who Ate Michael Rockefeller"), several others are standouts. In "Headlock," Dan Pinkerton deftly dramatizes a suburban crisis involving a depressed industrial-arts teacher, his straying wife and the teenaged hunk who challenges the cuckolded spouse to change his life. Peter Mountford offersa wry variation on W. Somerset Maugham's exotica in a rich study of generational and cultural conflict ("Horizon") set in Sri Lanka. In "Surfacing," Lauren Groff depicts with firm economy the strange lifelong relationship of a rich girl crippled during the 1918 influenza epidemic and the former Olympic athlete who saves, and forever alters, her life. A mixed bag, but the choicest morsels are well worth digging for.
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Product Details

ISBN:
9780156031493
Author:
Richard Bausch and John Kulka and Natalie Danford
Publisher:
Harvest Books
Editor:
Baush, Richard
Editor:
Bausch, Richard
Editor:
Kulka, John
Editor:
Danford, Natalie
Editor:
Kulka, John; Danford, Natalie
Author:
Bausch, Richard
Author:
Kulka, John
Author:
Danford, Natalie
Subject:
Anthologies (multiple authors)
Subject:
American fiction
Subject:
Short stories, American
Subject:
American fiction - 21st century
Subject:
Anthologies-General
Edition Description:
Trade Paper
Series:
Best New American Voices
Publication Date:
20071031
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
432
Dimensions:
8 x 5.31 in 0.87 lb

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Related Subjects

Fiction and Poetry » Anthologies » Annuals
Fiction and Poetry » Anthologies » General
Fiction and Poetry » Anthologies » Prize Winning Literature

Best New American Voices 2008 (Best New American Voices) New Trade Paper
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$24.95 In Stock
Product details 432 pages Harvest Books - English 9780156031493 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Each year the nation's most driven would-be writers seek out the structure and support of the many creative writing MFA programs and-as this volume proves-produce inspired work under their auspices. Now in its eighth year, this series showcases stories nominated by workshop directors and instructors and selected, in this case, by guest editor Bausch (Thanksgiving Night). A number of the writers featured in this edition breathe new life into familiar themes-the University of Iowa's Leslie Jamison takes on heartbreak, Stanford's Suzanne Rivecca examines sexual abuse, University of Massachusetts, Amherst's Jedediah Berry looks at death, Elizabeth Kadetsky represents the Wesleyan Writers Conference with a tale of innocence lost, and Adam Stumacher of the Wisconsin Institute takes on political strife-but just as many craft deftly original stories that defy easy categorization; one standout example is a playful story from the University of Mississippi's Christopher Stokes, 'The Man Who Ate Michael Rockefellar,' set in colonial Indonesia and narrated by a shrewd native. In his introduction, guest editor Bausch says that literature's ongoing quest is 'to make something lasting out of the confusions of living'; these imaginative debut artists offer happy proof that the challenge is still being met." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Synopsis" by , This year's volume, featuring 17 new stories selected by award-winning novelist John Casey, continues the tradition of identifying the best young writers on the cusp of their careers.
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