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2 Burnside History of Science- Computers

Computing: A Concise History (Mit Press Essential Knowledge)

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Computing: A Concise History (Mit Press Essential Knowledge) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

andlt;Pandgt;The history of computing could be told as the story of hardware and software, or the story of the Internet, or the story of andquot;smartandquot; hand-held devices, with subplots involving IBM, Microsoft, Apple, Facebook, and Twitter. In this concise and accessible account of the invention and development of digital technology, computer historian Paul Ceruzzi offers a broader and more useful perspective. He identifies four major threads that run throughout all of computing's technological development: digitization--the coding of information, computation, and control in binary form, ones and zeros; the convergence of multiple streams of techniques, devices, and machines, yielding more than the sum of their parts; the steady advance of electronic technology, as characterized famously by andquot;Moore's Lawandquot;; and the human-machine interface. Ceruzzi guides us through computing history, telling how a Bell Labs mathematician coined the word andquot;digitalandquot; in 1942 (to describe a high-speed method of calculating used in anti-aircraft devices), and recounting the development of the punch card (for use in the 1890 U.S. Census). He describes the ENIAC, built for scientific and military applications; the UNIVAC, the first general purpose computer; and ARPANET, the Internet's precursor. Ceruzzi's account traces the world-changing evolution of the computer from a room-size ensemble of machinery to a andquot;minicomputerandquot; to a desktop computer to a pocket-sized smart phone. He describes the development of the silicon chip, which could store ever-increasing amounts of data and enabled ever-decreasing device size. He visits that hotbed of innovation, Silicon Valley, and brings the story up to the present with the Internet, the World Wide Web, and social networking.andlt;/Pandgt;

Synopsis:

The history of computing could be told as the story of hardware and software, or the story of the Internet, or the story of "smart" hand-held devices, with subplots involving IBM, Microsoft, Apple, Facebook, and Twitter. In this concise and accessible account of the invention and development of digital technology, computer historian Paul Ceruzzi offers a broader and more useful perspective. He identifies four major threads that run throughout all of computing's technological development: digitization--the coding of information, computation, and control in binary form, ones and zeros; the convergence of multiple streams of techniques, devices, and machines, yielding more than the sum of their parts; the steady advance of electronic technology, as characterized famously by "Moore's Law"; and the human-machine interface. Ceruzzi guides us through computing history, telling how a Bell Labs mathematician coined the word "digital" in 1942 (to describe a high-speed method of calculating used in anti-aircraft devices), and recounting the development of the punch card (for use in the 1890 U.S. Census). He describes the ENIAC, built for scientific and military applications; the UNIVAC, the first general purpose computer; and ARPANET, the Internet's precursor. Ceruzzi's account traces the world-changing evolution of the computer from a room-size ensemble of machinery to a "minicomputer" to a desktop computer to a pocket-sized smart phone. He describes the development of the silicon chip, which could store ever-increasing amounts of data and enabled ever-decreasing device size. He visits that hotbed of innovation, Silicon Valley, and brings the story up to the present with the Internet, the World Wide Web, and social networking.

About the Author

Paul E. Ceruzzi is a Curator at the National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C. He is the author of A History of Modern Computing, Internet Alley: High Technology in Tysons Corner, 1945-2005, both published by the MIT Press, and other books.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780262517676
Author:
Ceruzzi, Paul E
Publisher:
MIT Press (MA)
Author:
Ceruzzi, Paul E.
Author:
Smithsonian Institution
Location:
Cambridge
Subject:
Engineering -- History.
Subject:
Computers Reference-History and Society
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Series:
The MIT Press Essential Knowledge series Computing
Publication Date:
20120615
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
from 17
Language:
English
Illustrations:
14 figures
Pages:
216
Dimensions:
7 x 5 in

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Related Subjects

Computers and Internet » Computers Reference » General
Computers and Internet » Computers Reference » History and Society
Computers and Internet » Personal Computers » General
Computers and Internet » Software Engineering » General
Engineering » Engineering » History
Reference » Science Reference » Technology
Science and Mathematics » Featured Titles in Tech » New Arrivals
Science and Mathematics » History of Science » Computers

Computing: A Concise History (Mit Press Essential Knowledge) Used Trade Paper
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Product details 216 pages MIT Press (MA) - English 9780262517676 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , The history of computing could be told as the story of hardware and software, or the story of the Internet, or the story of "smart" hand-held devices, with subplots involving IBM, Microsoft, Apple, Facebook, and Twitter. In this concise and accessible account of the invention and development of digital technology, computer historian Paul Ceruzzi offers a broader and more useful perspective. He identifies four major threads that run throughout all of computing's technological development: digitization--the coding of information, computation, and control in binary form, ones and zeros; the convergence of multiple streams of techniques, devices, and machines, yielding more than the sum of their parts; the steady advance of electronic technology, as characterized famously by "Moore's Law"; and the human-machine interface. Ceruzzi guides us through computing history, telling how a Bell Labs mathematician coined the word "digital" in 1942 (to describe a high-speed method of calculating used in anti-aircraft devices), and recounting the development of the punch card (for use in the 1890 U.S. Census). He describes the ENIAC, built for scientific and military applications; the UNIVAC, the first general purpose computer; and ARPANET, the Internet's precursor. Ceruzzi's account traces the world-changing evolution of the computer from a room-size ensemble of machinery to a "minicomputer" to a desktop computer to a pocket-sized smart phone. He describes the development of the silicon chip, which could store ever-increasing amounts of data and enabled ever-decreasing device size. He visits that hotbed of innovation, Silicon Valley, and brings the story up to the present with the Internet, the World Wide Web, and social networking.
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