Master your Minecraft
 
 

Special Offers see all

Enter to WIN a $100 Credit

Subscribe to PowellsBooks.news
for a chance to win.
Privacy Policy

Tour our stores


    Recently Viewed clear list


    Original Essays | November 7, 2014

    Karelia Stetz-Waters: IMG The Hot Sex Tip Cosmo Won't Tell You



    Cosmopolitan Magazine recently released an article titled "28 Mind-Blowing Lesbian Sex Positions." Where was this vital information when I was a... Continue »

    spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$7.00
New Trade Paper
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
Qty Store Section
1 Beaverton Literature- A to Z
19 Local Warehouse Literature- A to Z
20 Remote Warehouse Literature- A to Z

Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Modern Library Classics)

by

Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Modern Library Classics) Cover

 

 

Reading Group Guide

1. Critics have long disagreed about exactly what role Jim plays in Huckleberry Finn. Some have claimed, for example, that his purpose is solely to provide Huck with the opportunity for moral growth, while others have argued that he is a surrogate father figure to Huck. What do you think is Jim's role in the novel?

2. The ending of Huckleberry Finn has been the source of endless critical controveryse. Though no less than T.S. Eliot and Lionel Trilling defended the ending on the grounds that it is structurally coherent ("It is right," Eliot stated, "that the mood of the book should bring us back to the beginning"), many critics feel that the return of Tom Sawyer and his elaborate scheme for Jim's escape reduces what had been a serious quest for freedom to a silly farce. Bernard de Voto wrote, "In the whole reach of the English novel there is no more aburpt or more abrupt or chilling descent." How does the ending strike you?

3. The Mississippi can be considered a character in its own right in Huckleberry Finn. Discuss the role of the river in the novel.

4. How do humor and satire function in the book?

5. Critic William Manierre argued in a 1964-65 essay that "Huck's 'moral growth' has...been vastly overestimated," noting for example, that when his conscience begins to give him trouble, he decides he will "do whichever came handiest at the time," and that while Huck can be seen to achieve a kind of moral grandeur when he tears up the note he's written to Miss Watson, that achievement is underminded by his easy acceptance of Tom Sawyer's scheme in the last ten chapters. Do you agree or disagree?

6. In "The Greatness of Huckleberry Finn," Lionel Trilling stated that the style of the book is "not less than definitive in American literature," and Louis Budd has noted that "today it is standard academic wisdom that Twain's precedent-setting achievement is Huck's language." Discuss the effect of Twain's use of colloquial speech and dialect in the novel.

What Our Readers Are Saying

Add a comment for a chance to win!
Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

brunettegal418, January 2, 2008 (view all comments by brunettegal418)
This wonderful tale written by legendary Mark Twain captures the meaning of adventure, love, and friendship. A seemingly simple story of a white boy and his black slave traveling down the Mississippi River turns into a deep, moving, funny, and original adventure story. A classic must read for people of all ages to enjoy!
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(13 of 29 readers found this comment helpful)

Product Details

ISBN:
9780375757372
Introduction:
Saunders, George
Author:
Saunders, George
Author:
Twain, Mark
Author:
Mark Twain Introduction by George Saunders
Publisher:
Modern Library
Location:
New York
Subject:
Fiction
Subject:
Boys
Subject:
Classics
Subject:
Fugitive slaves
Subject:
Race relations
Subject:
Missouri
Subject:
Mississippi river
Subject:
Humorous fiction
Subject:
Adventure fiction
Subject:
Male friendship
Subject:
Runaway children
Subject:
Finn, Huckleberry
Subject:
Bildungsromans
Subject:
General Fiction
Subject:
Literature-A to Z
Copyright:
Edition Number:
2001
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Series:
Modern Library Classics
Series Volume:
v. 75, no. 1
Publication Date:
20010831
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
304
Dimensions:
8 x 5.12 x 0.64 in 0.5 lb

Other books you might like

  1. Lord of the Flies
    Used Mass Market $3.50
  2. Your Blues Ain't Like Mine Used Trade Paper $2.25
  3. To Kill a Mockingbird
    Used Mass Market $2.50
  4. Indian Killer
    Used Trade Paper $4.50
  5. Girl With a Pearl Earring
    Used Trade Paper $1.95
  6. 1984 (Signet Classics)
    Used Mass Market $3.50

Related Subjects


Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z
Health and Self-Help » Health and Medicine » General
Health and Self-Help » Health and Medicine » General Medicine

Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Modern Library Classics) Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$7.00 In Stock
Product details 304 pages Modern Library - English 9780375757372 Reviews:
"Staff Pick" by ,

I hadn't read Huckleberry Finn for more than 20 years, but I'm really glad I picked it up again. In terms of language alone, few writers, living or dead, can match the genius of Mark Twain.

"Synopsis" by , Jim, a runaway slave, joins Huck Finn, who is fleeing from his cruel father, and together, they journey by raft down the Mississippi River.
"Synopsis" by , Introduction by George Saunders

Commentary by Thomas Perry Sergeant, Bernard DeVoto, Clifton Fadiman, T. S. Eliot, and Leo Marx

 

“All modern American literature comes from one book by Mark Twain called Huckleberry Finn,” Ernest Hemingway wrote. “It’s the best book we’ve had.” A complex masterpiece that spawned controversy right from the start (it was banished from the Concord library shelves in 1885), it is at heart a compelling adventure story. Huck, in flight from his murderous father, and Jim, in flight from slavery, pilot their raft through treacherous waters, surviving a crash with a steamboat and betrayal by rogues. As Norman Mailer has said, “The mark of how good Huckleberry Finn has to be is that one can compare it to a number of our best modern American novels and it stands up page for page.”

"Synopsis" by , A complex masterpiece that spawned controversy right from the start (it was banished from the Concord library shelves in 1885), it is at heart a compelling adventure story. Huck, in flight from his murderous father, and Nigger Jim, in flight from slavery, pilot their raft through treacherous waters, surviving a crash with a steamboat and betrayal by rogues. Informing all this is the presence of the Mississippi, which Twain, the former steamboat pilot, describes in palpable detail and transforms into a metaphoric entity. Twain's other great innovation was the language of the book itself, which is expressive in a completely original way.
spacer
spacer
  • back to top

FOLLOW US ON...

     
Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.