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Other titles in the Sea of Trolls Trilogy series:

The Sea of Trolls

by

The Sea of Trolls Cover

 

 

Excerpt

Chapter Three: The Shadow Across The Water

"No...no..."

Jack sat up abruptly. The wind was howling outside. The house held the deep chill that seeped into it before dawn.

"No...I won't do it...it's evil..."

Jack threw back the covers and stumbled to the other end of the house. The Bard's bed was shaking. He saw the old man thrust up his hand as though warding something off. "Sir! Sir! Wake up! Everything's all right." He caught the Bard's hand.

"You won't bend me to your will! I defy you, foul troll!"

Something — some terrible force — flung the boy back. His head banged against the stone, and his ears rang as though a blacksmith were pounding on an anvil. He tasted blood.

"Oh, my stars, child! I didn't know it was you."

Jack tried to speak, choked on blood, and coughed instead.

"You're alive, thank Freya! Stay here. I'll build up the fire and make you a healing drink."

The ringing in Jack's ears died down, but he felt violently sick to his stomach. He heard the Bard move around, and presently, the hearth burst into light. In a very short time he was handed a cup of hot liquid. It hurt his mouth and he recoiled.

"You bit through your lip, child. It isn't as bad as it looks. The drink will make it better."

Jack managed to swallow, and the sickness went away. He found himself trembling. Perhaps he'd been trembling all along. He couldn't remember. "Is that — is that how — you destroy your enemies?" he stammered.

The Bard sat back. "One of the ways," he said.

"So that was...magic."

"Some call it so," said the Bard.

"Will you teach me how to do it?"

"By Thor's bushy beard! I almost killed you, and the first thing you want to know is how to do it."

"W-Well, sir, I am your a-apprentice."

"And a right cheeky one too. Most boys would have run home to their mothers after what you just experienced. Still, curiosity is a great thing. We two might just get along."

Jack felt a kind of warm sleepiness pass over him. The pain was still there, but it seemed unimportant. "What happened to you, sir?"

"That was a Nightmare, lad. Pray you never meet one."

"You mean, a bad dream?"

"I mean a Nightmare. It's far worse."

Jack wanted to ask more, but he was too comfortable. He yawned broadly, stretched out on the floor, and fell asleep.

When he awoke, he was lying outside on a bed of heather. He struggled to get up. "Rest a while, lad," said the Bard. He was sitting on a stool next to the door. His white beard and cloak shone against the weathered house. "Ah, sunlight," the old man said with a contented sigh. "It heals the terrors of the night."

"The Nightmare?" Jack said. His mouth hurt, and his speech was oddly slurred.

"Among other things," said the Bard. Jack felt his lip and found, to his horror, that it was as swollen as a mushroom after rain. "You wouldn't make a bad-looking troll at the moment," the old man remarked.

Jack remembered the words the Bard had cried out in his sleep. "Have you truly seen one, sir?"

"Oh, yes. Dozens. Most are quite pleasant, although they take getting used to. The ones you have to watch out for are the half-trolls. There's no describing how nasty they can be. Or deceitful. They're shape-shifters, and when they appear human, they're so beautiful that you can't think of a single sensible thing around them."

"Did one of them send the Nightmare?" said Jack.

"One of them rode it. Look, my boy, I was trying to protect you from certain things until you were older. But I may not have the time. Lately, I've felt a darkness over the sea. She's searching for me, you see. I can hide from her in the daytime. At night my guard is down, and she knows it."

"You could move in with the chief, sir. He could protect you," said Jack. He was beginning to get alarmed. This wasn't a saga or an amusing song. This was real.

The old man shook his head. "Your chief is a brave man, but he isn't up to handling trolls. She is hunting for me, and if she has found out where I am, her servants may already be on the way. I've been careless. I should have remembered that nowhere in the nine worlds is safe for me as long as she is abroad. I may even have to let her take me. Better that than let her destroy your village."

"But can't you flee?"

"Jotuns follow a trail like a hound. Her servants will come here first. If they don't find me, they'll kill all of you."

"Jotuns?" Jack said faintly.

"It's what the trolls call themselves. They can creep inside your mind and know what you're thinking. They know when and where you're going to strike before you do it. Only a very special kind of warrior can overcome them."

"We have to do something." Jack knew his voice sounded shrill, but he couldn't help it.

"We will," the Bard said firmly. "I'm on the alert now. I won't let her catch me off guard again. I should have been teaching you all these weeks, but the peacefulness of this place lulled me...."

The Bard fell silent, and Jack saw him looking out to sea. He looked too, but he saw only cloudless sky and gray-green waves bending toward shore. If there was darkness out there, he couldn't see it.

"You can go home for the next three days," said the Bard. "I'll be walking in the forest. Oh, and I wouldn't mention any of this to your family." He reached for his black staff. "We don't want to alarm them until it's necessary. Jotuns can follow a trail of fear as easily as foxes sniff out a henhouse."

 

"I spend half my time chasing those scurvy boys," said Father, slurping a bowl of Mother's rich cockle soup. Jack had provided the cockles from sea cliffs near the Bard's house. "They slide away like eels when there's real work to be done."

"Oh, aye. They're a useless lot," agreed Mother. She steadied Lucy's hands on her mug.

Jack didn't think the farm was suffering. The fences looked sturdy; the field was covered with oats and barley. Mustard, lavender, and coriander bloomed in the kitchen garden, and the apple trees were covered with tiny green fruit.

It was so beautiful, it made his throat ache. He'd never appreciated the little farm until now. And he saw his father in a new light. He realized that Giles Crookleg's complaints meant no more than the muttering of crows in a tree. It was a habit crows fell into when things weren't going their way. Father, too, grumbled by way of easing the disappointments in his life. What mattered was how Father went on in spite of his unhappiness, to create this beautiful place. Jack saw how lovingly the house was made, how carefully provisions were laid up so that Mother, Lucy, and himself could survive.

It could all be swept away in an instant. No one had any idea of the menace lurking over the sea.

"Jack's crying," said Lucy.

"I am not," Jack said indignantly. He turned his head away to hide the tears that had wandered down his cheek. He'd felt oddly shaken since the Bard had thrown him down. He seemed to cry more easily.

"Leave him alone, dearest," came Mother's soft voice. "His mouth is very sore."

"The Bard thrashed him," said Father.

"It was an accident," Jack said.

"Oh, aye. You may tell us that, but I know a thrashing when I see one."

Jack didn't say anything. If it pleased Father to think he'd been punished, why spoil things? And this, too, was new. Before, Jack would have argued passionately. Now he saw the lines of pain in his father's face, his hunched shoulders and scarred hands. The boy had a glimmer of another image, of his father as a child before the accident.

Jack felt like crying again. These new feelings were very odd and worrying.

Mother bent over Lucy's fair head. "You must finish your soup," she whispered.

"I don't like the bottom part. It's sandy," said Lucy.

"Washing cockles takes away the taste," said Mother, but she finished the dregs herself and gave Lucy an oatcake.

"Thrashing is good for boys," Giles Crookleg said. "Why, I was smacked six ways to Sunday by my father, and it made me the man I am today."

Then, because it was Sunday, Father told them a story about the holy saints. Father couldn't read, nor could anyone in the village except the Bard. To Giles Crookleg, writing was a kind of magic. When the Bard marked letters on a scrap of parchment, Father always crossed himself to avert a spell.

But he had memorized dozens of stories from the monks of the Holy Isle. Tonight's tale was of Saint Lawrence, martyred by pagans. "He was roasted over a slow fire," said Father to Lucy's horrified gasp. "They stuck garlic cloves between his toes and basted him all over like a chicken. When he was about to die and be taken into Heaven, Saint Lawrence said, 'I think I'm done. You may eat me when you will.' The pagans were so impressed, they fell on their knees and begged to become Christians."

Trolls eat people, thought Jack. They would come over the sea and stick garlic cloves between everyone's toes. He put his head down and thought about green hills and puffy clouds instead. He must not be afraid. Jotuns followed fear like a trail.

Later Lucy wanted to hear her own story of how she had lived in a palace.

"This will come to grief," said Mother. "She can't tell the difference between fact and fancy."

Father ignored her. Jack knew he looked forward to the tales as much as Lucy did. The boy understood — how had he changed so much in a few weeks? — that these, too, were a comfort to his father. Giles Crookleg might grumble like a crow, but he lost himself like a bird in the clouds of his own imaginings. He no longer had to set foot on the earth or know that he was doomed to creep upon it.

"Once upon a time," said Father, "the queen dropped a honey cake on the ground."

"My other mother," prompted Lucy.

Mother sniffed. She had long since stopped explaining that Lucy couldn't have two sets of parents.

"It put down roots and grew," said Father.

"Until it was as tall as the oak by the blacksmith's shed," Lucy said.

"Every branch was covered with honey cakes. Invisible servants flew through the air to fetch them."

"Invisible servants! I'd like that," said Mother.

"You had a little dog with a green collar with silver bells sewn on it. You could hear it running through the house."

"Castle," Lucy corrected.

"Yes, of course. Castle. And it could talk. It told you everything that went on in the kingdom, but alas, it was very naughty. The dog ran away, and the nurse ran after it."

"With me in her arms," said Lucy.

"Yes. She got lost in the woods. She sat down to weep and tear her hair."

"She laid me under a rosebush first," said Lucy.

"A bear came out of the woods and gobbled her up, but he didn't find you, dearest."

"And that was how I got lost," crowed Lucy, not at all concerned about the fate of the nurse.

Jack fell asleep listening to the north wind fussing with the thatch over his head.

Copyright © 2004 by Nancy Farmer

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 3 comments:

Kriskus, August 13, 2007 (view all comments by Kriskus)
this book is 1 of 2 books that i have ever read twice so it is a very interesting and exiting story. in the beginning it gives you a very good insight of the way they live. As the story goes it's as if you get pulled closer and closer into the story with more exitement and Nancy Farmer did a phenomenal job getting the info of the way the barbarians and saxons lived. I highly recommend anyone who has an interest in midieval books and books of the dark ages, because im a huge fan of world history and this book has some of the best information about their way of life even religion is added.
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(9 of 19 readers found this comment helpful)
Sciteacher, November 2, 2006 (view all comments by Sciteacher)
I have read many of Nancy Farmer's books, including:
The Eye, the Ear, and the Arm and The House of the Scorpian. Both of these books were full of rich characters and had original storylines with lots of action. The Sea of Trolls had it all! The characters were not only interesting but vividly described as well. I loved how the author weaved the Norse mythology into the story too. I would highly recommend this book - and any other Nancy Farmer book - to anyone:)
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(14 of 26 readers found this comment helpful)
angel_child, June 28, 2006 (view all comments by angel_child)
This was a good and enjoyable book. I found it quite easy to read though.
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(21 of 35 readers found this comment helpful)
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Product Details

ISBN:
9780689867460
Author:
Farmer, Nancy
Publisher:
Simon Pulse
Subject:
Science Fiction, Fantasy, & Magic
Subject:
Brothers and sisters
Subject:
Horror & Ghost Stories
Subject:
Children's 9-12 - Fiction - Historical
Subject:
Historical - Exploration & Discoveries
Subject:
Legends, Myths, & Fables - Norse
Subject:
Mythology, norse
Subject:
Historical / Exploration & Discovery
Subject:
Action & Adventure - General
Subject:
Fantasy & Magic
Subject:
Trolls
Subject:
Children s-Science Fiction and Fantasy
Copyright:
Edition Number:
Reprint ed.
Edition Description:
B102
Publication Date:
May 23, 2006
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
from 9
Language:
English
Illustrations:
f-c cvr
Pages:
480
Dimensions:
8.25 x 5.5 in
Age Level:
9-12

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The Sea of Trolls Used Trade Paper
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Product details 480 pages Simon Pulse - English 9780689867460 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Readers will want to sail through these nearly 500 pages to find out what happens to young Jack and his sister, Lucy, kidnapped from their homeland by a Viking crew led by Olaf One-Brow. The two then travel across the sea where Ivar the Boneless, king of the Northmen, reigns with his half-troll wife, Queen Frith. The Bard, who fled from Queen Frith and has taken refuge on the boy's small island ('Nowhere in the nine worlds is safe for me as long as she is abroad,' the Bard explains) takes in 12-year-old Jack as an apprentice. The old man manages to teach Jack some magic and some of the complex history of the Northmen and their enemies, the Jotuns or trolls, before Olaf and his men invade. The book brims with delectable details. Ivar the Boneless, for instance, 'wears a cloak made from the beards of his defeated enemies' and Queen Frith's beauty dissolves when Jack begins to sing a tribute to her ('Her features rippled and twisted like the beasts carved on the walls'). Her rage at reverting back to her troll-like appearance prompts Jack's quest to seek Mimir's Well, in the heart of Jotunheim (troll country) in order to reverse the spell and save his sister, whom Queen Frith threatens to sacrifice if her beauty is not restored. Plotting and incidental players such as dragons and giant spiders in Jotunheim take precedence over character development here. But if the relationships are not as fully fleshed out as in Farmer's previous books, fans of Viking and adventure tales will still be up late nights to discover Jack's fate. Ages 10-13." Publishers Weekly (Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review" by , "Allusions to Beowulf, the destruction of the Holy Isle of Lindisfarne, and the Norse legend of Jack and Jill offer a rich backdrop for a hugely entertaining story sure to appeal to fans of The Lord of the Rings."
"Review" by , "Farmer brilliantly marries historic details about life in England, Scotland and Scandinavia in A.D. 793 with the magic of runes, trolls and bards. This story will send readers on a quest to read more about this bloody but fascinating era."
"Review" by , "[A]n engaging tale....[T]here are plenty of lighthearted moments, and the characters never seem stiff or contrived. This exciting and original fantasy will capture the hearts and imaginations of readers."
"Review" by , "[S]hould instantly be added to the list of those books which leave an indelible mark on the imagination....[A] hair-raising, spine-tingling, heart-stopping adventure which really does bear comparison to The Hobbit....[T]he best children's novel of 2004."
"Review" by , "The book is effectively sparing in its use of fantasy elements, but when Farmer pulls out all the stops — such as Jack's encounter with the three Norns — she does so with aplomb and assurance."
"Review" by , "Farmer...has outdone herself in this rich and satisfying fantasy....The characters are memorable, her images of nature are lyrical, and legend, history, horror and humor are cleverly intermingled..."
"Review" by , "The Sea of Trolls conveys, more vividly than any textbook, the vikings' storied fatalism....Hearing the Northmen talk rapturously about the glories of being slaughtered in battle, the sensitive Jack can't understand it, but the reader will."
"Review" by , "Farmer uses sensory detail to breathe reality into every segment of this book....[A] spectacular story of magical adventure."
"Review" by , "Readers captivated by slash-'em-up Viking culture will happily plunge into this celebrated author's sixth novel, but many members of Farmer's traditional audience will emerge from the experience feeling alternately dazzled and dazed."
"Synopsis" by , The three-time Newbery Honor-winning author and National Book Award recipient pens a new adventure set in A.D. 793 in the land of the Vikings, where two children are soon swept up in a quest on which they encounter a dragon, a giant spider, and trolls.
"Synopsis" by , After Jack becomes apprenticed to a Druid bard, he and his little sister Lucy are captured by Viking Berserkers and taken to the home of King Ivar the Boneless and his half-troll queen, leading Jack to undertake a vital quest to Jotunheim, home of the trolls.
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