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Other titles in the Princeton Studies in International History and Politics series:

Roosevelt and the Munich Crisis: A Study of Political Decision-Making (Princeton Studies in International History and Politics)

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Roosevelt and the Munich Crisis: A Study of Political Decision-Making (Princeton Studies in International History and Politics) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Franklin Roosevelt's intentions during the three years between Munich and Pearl Harbor have been a source of controversy among historians for decades. Barbara Farnham offers both a theory of how the domestic political context affects foreign policy decisions in general and a fresh interpretation of FDR's post-Munich policies based on the insights that the theory provides. Between 1936 and 1938, Roosevelt searched for ways to influence the deteriorating international situation. When Hitler's behavior during the Munich crisis showed him to be incorrigibly aggressive, FDR settled on aiding the democracies, a course to which he adhered until America's entry into the war. This policy attracted him because it allowed him to deal with a serious problem: the conflict between the need to stop Hitler and the domestic imperative to avoid any risk of American involvement in a war.

Because existing theoretical approaches to value conflict ignore the influence of political factors on decision-making, they offer little help in explaining Roosevelt's behavior. As an alternative, this book develops a political approach to decision-making which focuses on the impact that awareness of the imperatives of the political context can have on decision-making processes and, through them, policy outcomes. It suggests that in the face of a clash of central values decision-makers who are aware of the demands of the political context are likely to be reluctant to make trade-offs, seeking instead a solution that gives some measure of satisfaction to all the values implicated in the decision.

Synopsis:

"Solving the FDR enigma is not easy. Farnham's theory, bringing an essentially political dimension to the problem of choice, provides historians with a more rigorous and intellectually viable approach to the problem of decoding FDR."--Waldo Heinrichs, San Diego State University

"This work provides a subtle reading of FDR's actions and motivations. The result is a fascinating, original, and highly readable book."--Fred I. Greenstein, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Princeton University

Synopsis:

Franklin Roosevelt's intentions during the three years between Munich and Pearl Harbor have been a source of controversy among historians for decades. Barbara Farnham offers both a theory of how the domestic political context affects foreign policy decisions in general and a fresh interpretation of FDR's post-Munich policies based on the insights that the theory provides. Between 1936 and 1938, Roosevelt searched for ways to influence the deteriorating international situation. When Hitler's behavior during the Munich crisis showed him to be incorrigibly aggressive, FDR settled on aiding the democracies, a course to which he adhered until America's entry into the war. This policy attracted him because it allowed him to deal with a serious problem: the conflict between the need to stop Hitler and the domestic imperative to avoid any risk of American involvement in a war.

Because existing theoretical approaches to value conflict ignore the influence of political factors on decision-making, they offer little help in explaining Roosevelt's behavior. As an alternative, this book develops a political approach to decision-making which focuses on the impact that awareness of the imperatives of the political context can have on decision-making processes and, through them, policy outcomes. It suggests that in the face of a clash of central values decision-makers who are aware of the demands of the political context are likely to be reluctant to make trade-offs, seeking instead a solution that gives some measure of satisfaction to all the values implicated in the decision.

Table of Contents

Preface
Abbreviations Used in the Footnotes
Ch. IRoosevelt, the Munich Crisis, and Political Decision-Making3
Ch. IIThe Political Approach to Decision-Making19
Ch. IIIThe "Watershed" between Two Wars: 1936-193849
Ch. IVThe Munich Crisis91
Ch. VAssessing the Munich Crisis137
Ch. VIDealing with the Consequences of Munich173
Ch. VIIImplications for History and Theory228
App. ATraditional Approaches to Decision-Making245
App. BAnalyzing the Calculus of Political Feasibility: The Nature of the Acceptability Constraint259
App. CThe Traditional Political Strategies265
Bibliography273
Index301

Product Details

ISBN:
9780691070742
Author:
Farnham, Barbara Rearden
Publisher:
Princeton University Press
Author:
Farnham, Barbara Reardon
Location:
Princeton
Subject:
General
Subject:
International Relations
Subject:
U.S. Government
Subject:
Germany
Subject:
Decision-making
Subject:
International Relations - General
Subject:
Government - U.S. Government
Subject:
United States - 20th Century
Subject:
American history
Subject:
Political Science and International Relations
Subject:
Politics-United States Foreign Policy
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Series:
Princeton Studies in International History and Politics Paperback
Publication Date:
October 2000
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
College/higher education:
Language:
English
Pages:
328
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in 17 oz

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Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Politics » General
History and Social Science » Politics » United States » Foreign Policy
History and Social Science » US History » 1920 to 1960
History and Social Science » US History » Presidents » Roosevelt, Franklin D.

Roosevelt and the Munich Crisis: A Study of Political Decision-Making (Princeton Studies in International History and Politics) New Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$50.25 In Stock
Product details 328 pages Princeton University Press - English 9780691070742 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , "Solving the FDR enigma is not easy. Farnham's theory, bringing an essentially political dimension to the problem of choice, provides historians with a more rigorous and intellectually viable approach to the problem of decoding FDR."--Waldo Heinrichs, San Diego State University

"This work provides a subtle reading of FDR's actions and motivations. The result is a fascinating, original, and highly readable book."--Fred I. Greenstein, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Princeton University

"Synopsis" by , Franklin Roosevelt's intentions during the three years between Munich and Pearl Harbor have been a source of controversy among historians for decades. Barbara Farnham offers both a theory of how the domestic political context affects foreign policy decisions in general and a fresh interpretation of FDR's post-Munich policies based on the insights that the theory provides. Between 1936 and 1938, Roosevelt searched for ways to influence the deteriorating international situation. When Hitler's behavior during the Munich crisis showed him to be incorrigibly aggressive, FDR settled on aiding the democracies, a course to which he adhered until America's entry into the war. This policy attracted him because it allowed him to deal with a serious problem: the conflict between the need to stop Hitler and the domestic imperative to avoid any risk of American involvement in a war.

Because existing theoretical approaches to value conflict ignore the influence of political factors on decision-making, they offer little help in explaining Roosevelt's behavior. As an alternative, this book develops a political approach to decision-making which focuses on the impact that awareness of the imperatives of the political context can have on decision-making processes and, through them, policy outcomes. It suggests that in the face of a clash of central values decision-makers who are aware of the demands of the political context are likely to be reluctant to make trade-offs, seeking instead a solution that gives some measure of satisfaction to all the values implicated in the decision.

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