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Vagabonding: An Uncommon Guide to the Art of Long-Term World Travel

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Vagabonding: An Uncommon Guide to the Art of Long-Term World Travel Cover

ISBN13: 9780812992182
ISBN10: 0812992180
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Excerpt

Chapter 1

From this hour I ordain myself loos'd of limits and imaginary lines, Going where I list, my own master total and absolute, Listening to others, considering well what they say, Pausing, searching, receiving, contemplating, Gently, but with undeniable will divesting myself of the holds that would hold me.

-Walt Whitman, "Song of the Open Road"

Declare Your Independence

Of all the outrageous throwaway lines one hears in movies, there is one that stands out for me. It doesn't come from a madcap comedy, an esoteric science-fiction flick, or a special-effects-laden action thriller. It comes from Oliver Stone's Wall Street, when the Charlie Sheen character - a promising big shot in the stock market - is telling his girlfriend about his dreams.

"I think if I can make a bundle of cash before I'm thirty and get out of this racket," he says, "I'll be able to ride my motorcycle across China."

When I first saw this scene on video a few years ago, I nearly fell out of my seat in astonishment. After all, Charlie Sheen or anyone else could work for eight months as a toilet cleaner and have enough money to ride a motorcycle across China. Even if they didn't yet have their own motorcycle, another couple months of scrubbing toilets would earn them enough to buy one when they got to China.

The thing is, most Americans probably wouldn't find this movie scene odd. For some reason, we see long-term travel to faraway lands as a recurring dream or an exotic temptation, but not something that applies to the here and now. Instead?out of our insane duty to fear, fashion, and monthly payments on things we don't really need - we quarantine our travels to short, frenzied bursts. In this way, as we throw our wealth at an abstract notion called "lifestyle," travel becomes just another accessory -a smooth-edged, encapsulated experience that we purchase the same way we buy clothing and furniture.

Not long ago, I read that nearly a quarter of a million short-term monastery- and convent-based vacations had been booked and sold by tour agents in the year 2000. Spiritual enclaves from Greece to Tibet were turning into hot tourist draws, and travel pundits attributed this "solace boom" to the fact that "busy overachievers are seeking a simpler life."

What nobody bothered to point out, of course, is that purchasing a package vacation to find a simpler life is kind of like using a mirror to see what you look like when you aren't looking into the mirror. All that is really sold is the romantic notion of a simpler life, and - just as no amount of turning your head or flicking your eyes will allow you to unselfconsciously see yourself in the looking glass - no combination of one-week or ten-day vacations will truly take you away from the life you lead at home.

Ultimately, this shotgun wedding of time and money has a way of keeping us in a holding pattern. The more we associate experience with cash value, the more we think that money is what we need to live. And the more we associate money with life, the more we convince ourselves that we're too poor to buy our freedom. With this kind of mind-set, it's no wonder so many Americans think extended overseas travel is the exclusive realm of students, counterculture dropouts, and the idle rich.

In reality, long-term travel has nothing to do with demographics - age, ideology, income - and everything to do with personal outlook. Long-term travel isn't about being a college student; it's about being a student of daily life. Long-term travel isn't an act of rebellion against society; it's an act of common sense within society. Long-term travel doesn't require a massive "bundle of cash"; it requires only that we walk through the world in a more deliberate way.

This deliberate way of walking through the world has always been intrinsic to the time-honored, quietly available travel tradition known as "vagabonding."

Vagabonding involves taking an extended time-out from your normal life?six weeks, four months, two years?to travel the world on your own terms.

But beyond travel, vagabonding is an outlook on life. Vagabonding is about using the prosperity and possibility of the information age to increase your personal options instead of your personal possessions. Vagabonding is about looking for adventure in normal life, and normal life within adventure. Vagabonding is an attitude?a friendly interest in people, places, and things that makes a person an explorer in the truest, most vivid sense of the word.

Vagabonding is not a lifestyle, nor is it a trend. It's just an uncommon way of looking at life - a value adjustment from which action naturally follows. And, as much as anything, vagabonding is about time - our only real commodity - and how we choose to use it.

Sierra Club founder John Muir (an ur-vagabonder if there ever was one) used to express amazement at the well-heeled travelers who would visit Yosemite only to rush away after a few hours of sightseeing. Muir called these folks the "time-poor" - people who were so obsessed with tending their material wealth and social standing that they couldn't spare the time to truly experience the splendor of California's Sierra wilderness. One of Muir's Yosemite visitors in the summer of 1871 was Ralph Waldo Emerson, who gushed upon seeing the sequoias, "It's a wonder that we can see these trees and not wonder more." When Emerson scurried off a couple hours later, however, Muir speculated wryly about whether the famous transcendentalist had really seen the trees in the first place.

Nearly a century later, naturalist Edwin Way Teale used Muir's example to lament the frenetic pace of modern society. "Freedom as John Muir knew it," he wrote in his 1956 book Autumn Across America, "with its wealth of time, its unregimented days, its latitude of choice . . . such freedom seems more rare, more difficult to attain, more remote with each new generation."

But Teale's lament for the deterioration of personal freedom was just as hollow a generalization in 1956 as it is now. As John Muir was well aware, vagabonding has never been regulated by the fickle public definition of lifestyle. Rather, it has always been a private choice within a society that is constantly urging us to do otherwise.

This is a book about living that choice.

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Average customer rating based on 2 comments:

clackamaslee, April 24, 2014 (view all comments by clackamaslee)
This is a pretty simple book, designed for those who have never traveled but always felt the wanderlust itch in their feet. By "travel" I'm referring to long-term, low-budget travel. This is definitely not intended for the independently wealthy or those who don't know how to function without all of the conveniences of home. Nor is meant for the person who has a couple of weeks off of work and just wants to get out of town. There are many other books for those interested in that type of travel.

Potts describes several different approaches to travel and refrains from passing judgment on any of them. He lays out the pros and cons of each style and lets you decide what's right for you. He provides some how-to, some what NOT to do, and dozens of resources. He is also continually adding to and updating the resources on his website. Somehow, he passes on all of this information without making the book feel like a typical travel book.

I took six months off after college and traveled around the U.S. with my then-toddler son. Sustained travel can be difficult even in this country. When my son graduates high school, I plan to try long-term international travel. This book was a great jumping off point for me. I was surprisingly impressed and inspired.
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megcampbell3, February 15, 2008 (view all comments by megcampbell3)
This slim volume on perpetual travel is equal parts practical advice and you've-only-one-life-to-live inspiration. Having already quit my job, sold my condo, and put everything else in to storage, I was already three or four chapters down the road with Potts before I'd ever heard of him or of "Vagabonding", but the true excitement and pure love that he conveys for a life of wanderlust is enough to give me all the extra confidence (a boost up and onto the horse) I needed; because indeed, I've done a great thing by pitching my whole daily routine with all its attachments in favor of the road for awhile. If well-placed in your days, this book may work the same magic on you.
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Product Details

ISBN:
9780812992182
Subtitle:
An Uncommon Guide to the Art of Long-Term World Travel
Author:
Potts, Rolf
Publisher:
Villard
Location:
New York
Subject:
General
Subject:
Reference - Guides (General)
Subject:
Travel
Subject:
Reference - Tips
Subject:
Sabbatical leave.
Subject:
General Travel
Subject:
TRAVEL / General
Copyright:
Edition Number:
1st ed.
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Series Volume:
RN-0283
Publication Date:
20021224
Binding:
Paperback
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
224
Dimensions:
8 x 5.1 x 0.5 in 0.375 lb

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Related Subjects

Business » Management
History and Social Science » Politics » General
Humanities » Philosophy » General
Travel » General
Travel » World Miscellaneous

Vagabonding: An Uncommon Guide to the Art of Long-Term World Travel Used Trade Paper
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Product details 224 pages Villard Books - English 9780812992182 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , Veteran shoestring traveler Potts shows how anyone armed with an independent, curious spirit can achieve the dream of extended overseas travel, once thought to be the sole province of students, counterculture dropouts, and the idle rich.
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