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Empire of the Beetle: How Human Folly and a Tiny Bug Are Killing North America's Great Forests (David Suzuki Foundation Series)

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Empire of the Beetle: How Human Folly and a Tiny Bug Are Killing North America's Great Forests (David Suzuki Foundation Series) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Beginning in the late 1980s, a series of improbable bark beetle outbreaks unsettled iconic forests and communities across western North America. An insect the size of a rice kernel eventually killed more than 30 billion pine and spruce trees from Alaska to New Mexico. Often appearing in masses larger than schools of killer whales, the beetles engineered one of the world's greatest forest die-offs since the deforestation of Europe by peasants between the eleventh and thirteenth centuries.

The beetle didn't act alone. Misguided science, out-of-control logging, bad public policy, and a hundred years of fire suppression created a volatile geography that released the world's oldest forest manager from all natural constraints. Like most human empires, the beetles exploded wildly and then crashed, leaving in their wake grieving landowners, humbled scientists, hungry animals, and altered watersheds. Although climate change triggered this complex event, human arrogance assuredly set the table. With little warning, an ancient insect pointedly exposed the frailty of seemingly stable manmade landscapes. And despite the billions of public dollars spent on control efforts, the beetles burn away like a fire that can't be put out.

Drawing on first-hand accounts from entomologists, botanists, foresters, and rural residents, award-winning journalist Andrew Nikiforuk investigates this unprecedented beetle plague, its startling implications, and the lessons it holds.

Review:

"With equal attention to the destructive actions of insects and humans alike, Canadian journalist Nikiforuk (Tar Sands) describes the decimation of expanses of conifers by bark beetles on Alaska's Kenai Peninsula. Quoting entomologist Stephen L. Wood, who wrote the bible on bark beetles, Nikiforuk explains that in a healthy forest, the beetles act as managers, killing off stagnant trees, recycling them as forest nutrients, and making way for younger, more vigorous trees. But because the beetles' function 'competes with human interests' the beetles have been transformed into a dangerously destructive element. Ineffective and forest- and community-destroying policies to fight the beetles, such as poisoning and clear-cutting, and forestry tactics like monoculture, which lower the forests' resilience, combined with global warming — which causes an increase in beetle reproductive cycles and weakens forests with droughts — seem to have turned what was once an essential part of the forest life cycle into an ecological disaster. Nikiforuk leavens this tragic, instructive history with curious facts about the complex, intelligent insect and intriguing experiments using sounds to 'defeat scolytids and temper their forest-eating behavior.' Nikiforuk's florid language, affection for the beetles, and scorn for the humans in his story are sometimes extravagant, but lighten the tone of what in other hands could be an overwhelmingly depressing topic. (Sept.)" Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

About the Author

Andrew Nikiforuk is an award-winning journalist who has written about education, economics, and the environment for the last two decades. His books include Pandemonium, Saboteurs: Wiebo Ludwig's War Against Oil, which won the Governor General's Literary Award for Non-Fiction, and The Fourth Horseman: A Short History of Plagues, Scourges and Emerging Viruses. His bestselling book Tar Sands won the Rachel Carson Environment Book Award.

Table of Contents

Prologue

Chapter One: The Alaska Storm

Chapter Two: The Beetle, the Bus, and the Carbon Castle

Chapter Three: The Lodgepole Tsunami

Chapter Four: The War against the Insect Enemy

Chapter Five: In the Wake of the Beetle

Chapter Six: The Ghost Forest

Chapter Seven: The Song of the Beetle

Chapter Eight: The Sheath-Winged Cosmos

Chapter Nine: The Two Dianas

Chapter Ten: The Parable of the Worm

Sources and Further Information

Acknowledgements

Index

Product Details

ISBN:
9781553655107
Author:
Nikiforuk, Andrew
Publisher:
Greystone Books
Author:
Andrew Nikiforuk
Subject:
Trees
Subject:
Nature Studies-Trees
Subject:
Physics-Meteorology
Edition Description:
Trade Paper
Publication Date:
20110831
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Language:
English
Illustrations:
BandW illustrations, Maps
Pages:
240
Dimensions:
8.5 x 5.5 in

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Related Subjects

Science and Mathematics » Environmental Studies » General
Science and Mathematics » Environmental Studies » Management
Science and Mathematics » Forestry » General
Science and Mathematics » Nature Studies » General
Science and Mathematics » Physics » Meteorology

Empire of the Beetle: How Human Folly and a Tiny Bug Are Killing North America's Great Forests (David Suzuki Foundation Series) Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$17.95 In Stock
Product details 240 pages Greystone Books - English 9781553655107 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "With equal attention to the destructive actions of insects and humans alike, Canadian journalist Nikiforuk (Tar Sands) describes the decimation of expanses of conifers by bark beetles on Alaska's Kenai Peninsula. Quoting entomologist Stephen L. Wood, who wrote the bible on bark beetles, Nikiforuk explains that in a healthy forest, the beetles act as managers, killing off stagnant trees, recycling them as forest nutrients, and making way for younger, more vigorous trees. But because the beetles' function 'competes with human interests' the beetles have been transformed into a dangerously destructive element. Ineffective and forest- and community-destroying policies to fight the beetles, such as poisoning and clear-cutting, and forestry tactics like monoculture, which lower the forests' resilience, combined with global warming — which causes an increase in beetle reproductive cycles and weakens forests with droughts — seem to have turned what was once an essential part of the forest life cycle into an ecological disaster. Nikiforuk leavens this tragic, instructive history with curious facts about the complex, intelligent insect and intriguing experiments using sounds to 'defeat scolytids and temper their forest-eating behavior.' Nikiforuk's florid language, affection for the beetles, and scorn for the humans in his story are sometimes extravagant, but lighten the tone of what in other hands could be an overwhelmingly depressing topic. (Sept.)" Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
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