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Meme (Kuhl House Poets)

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Meme (Kuhl House Poets) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Acclaimed poet Susan Wheeler, whose last individual collection predicted the spiritual losses of the economic collapse, turns her attention to the most intimate of subjects: the absence or loss of love.
 
A meme is a unit of thought replicated by imitation; examples of memes, Richard Dawkins wrote, “are tunes, ideas, catch-phrases, clothes fashions, ways of making pots or of building arches.” Occupy Wall Street is a meme, as are internet ideas and images that go viral. What could be more potent memes than those passed down by parents to their children?
 

Wheeler reconstructs her mother’s voice—down to its cynicism and its mid twentieth-century midwestern vernacular—in “The Maud Poems,” a voice that takes a more aggressive, vituperative turn in “The Devil—or—The Introjects.” In the book’s third long sequence, a generational inheritance feeds cultural transmission in “The Split.” A set of variations on losses and break-ups—wildly, darkly funny throughout and, in places, devastatingly sad—“The Split” brings Wheeler’s lauded inventiveness, wit, and insight to the profound loss of love. One read, and the meme “Should I stay or should I go?” will be altered in your head forever. 

Review:

"'There is no knack for grief,' writes Wheeler (Assorted Poems), but her far-reaching experimentation suggests that — through language — she's seeking one. Three wild sequences struggling with loss comprise this volume: In 'The Maud Poems,' a daughter attempts to make sense of a mother's language rife with idioms and clichés by collaging stanzas of the poet's own lyric voice ('In the sepulcher where the mother lay/ at last some sleep to gain,/ Hannah helped me carve the oak/ into granite with her cane') between nagging bursts ('Don't come in here all bright-eyed and bushy-tailed expecting us to give you more'). The second sequence, 'The Devil — or — The Introjects' remixes this vernacular with narrative in dense — sometimes opaque — units. The last is also the most stirring sequence: 'The Split' recounts disaster that 'doubles at the slightest slight' through slippery lines that reveal masterful dexterity without compromising meaning. 'Such is the state of our poetry caught in my throat on its way/ to my mouth, why not do everything// but of course we do nothing' she writes. Wheeler's ambitious new book comes closer to doing everything — much closer — and we are left awed at Wheeler's audacity. (Oct.)" Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Synopsis:

Acclaimed poet Susan Wheeler, whose last individual collection predicted the spiritual losses of the economic collapse, turns her attention to the most intimate of subjects: the absence or loss of love. 

Synopsis:

For decades a restorer of old homes, Connie Wanek shows us that poetry is everywhere, encountered as easily in the waterways, landscapes, and winters of Minnesota, as in the old roofs and darkened drawers of a home long uninhabited. Rival Gardens includes more than thirty unpublished poems, along with poems selected from three previous books—all in Wanek’s unmistakable voice: plainspoken and elegant, unassuming and wise, observant and original. Many of her new poems focus on the garden, beginning with the Garden of Eden.
 
A deep feeling for family and for the losses and gains of growing into maturity mark the tone of Rival Gardens, with Wanek always attending to the telling detail and the natural world.

Synopsis:

Winner of the Sillerman First Book Prize for African Poets, The Kitchen-Dwellers Testimony is based on a Somali insult: jiko muufo. Translated literally as “kitchen flatbread,” the insult criticizes those women who love domestic work so much that they happily watch bread rise. This collection of poems examines the varied ways women navigate gender roles, while examining praise for success within roles where imagination about female ability is limited. The Kitchen-Dwellers Testimony is about love and longing, divorce, distilled desire, and all the ways we injure ourselves and one another.

About the Author

Susan Wheeler is the author of the poetry collections Bag ‘o’ Diamonds, which received the Norma Farber First Book Award of the Poetry Society of America; Smokes, which won the Four Way Books Award; Source Codes; Ledger, winner of the Iowa Poetry Prize; and Assorted Poems. Her novel, Record Palace, was published in 2005. She teaches at Princeton University, where she also directs the Creative Writing Program. 

Product Details

ISBN:
9781609381271
Author:
Wheeler, Susan
Publisher:
University of Nebraska Press
Author:
Kooser, Ted
Author:
Wanek, Connie
Author:
Osman, Ladan
Author:
Dawes, Kwame
Subject:
General Poetry
Subject:
Poetry-A to Z
Subject:
Single Author / American
Edition Description:
1
Series:
African Poetry Book
Publication Date:
20150401
Binding:
Electronic book text in proprietary or open standard format
Language:
English
Pages:
108
Dimensions:
8 x 6 in

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Meme (Kuhl House Poets) Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$8.95 In Stock
Product details 108 pages University of Iowa Press - English 9781609381271 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "'There is no knack for grief,' writes Wheeler (Assorted Poems), but her far-reaching experimentation suggests that — through language — she's seeking one. Three wild sequences struggling with loss comprise this volume: In 'The Maud Poems,' a daughter attempts to make sense of a mother's language rife with idioms and clichés by collaging stanzas of the poet's own lyric voice ('In the sepulcher where the mother lay/ at last some sleep to gain,/ Hannah helped me carve the oak/ into granite with her cane') between nagging bursts ('Don't come in here all bright-eyed and bushy-tailed expecting us to give you more'). The second sequence, 'The Devil — or — The Introjects' remixes this vernacular with narrative in dense — sometimes opaque — units. The last is also the most stirring sequence: 'The Split' recounts disaster that 'doubles at the slightest slight' through slippery lines that reveal masterful dexterity without compromising meaning. 'Such is the state of our poetry caught in my throat on its way/ to my mouth, why not do everything// but of course we do nothing' she writes. Wheeler's ambitious new book comes closer to doing everything — much closer — and we are left awed at Wheeler's audacity. (Oct.)" Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
"Synopsis" by ,

Acclaimed poet Susan Wheeler, whose last individual collection predicted the spiritual losses of the economic collapse, turns her attention to the most intimate of subjects: the absence or loss of love. 

"Synopsis" by ,
For decades a restorer of old homes, Connie Wanek shows us that poetry is everywhere, encountered as easily in the waterways, landscapes, and winters of Minnesota, as in the old roofs and darkened drawers of a home long uninhabited. Rival Gardens includes more than thirty unpublished poems, along with poems selected from three previous books—all in Wanek’s unmistakable voice: plainspoken and elegant, unassuming and wise, observant and original. Many of her new poems focus on the garden, beginning with the Garden of Eden.
 
A deep feeling for family and for the losses and gains of growing into maturity mark the tone of Rival Gardens, with Wanek always attending to the telling detail and the natural world.
"Synopsis" by ,

Winner of the Sillerman First Book Prize for African Poets, The Kitchen-Dwellers Testimony is based on a Somali insult: jiko muufo. Translated literally as “kitchen flatbread,” the insult criticizes those women who love domestic work so much that they happily watch bread rise. This collection of poems examines the varied ways women navigate gender roles, while examining praise for success within roles where imagination about female ability is limited. The Kitchen-Dwellers Testimony is about love and longing, divorce, distilled desire, and all the ways we injure ourselves and one another.

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