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1 Beaverton Literature- A to Z

Desert Solitaire

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Desert Solitaire Cover

ISBN13: 9780671695880
ISBN10: 0671695886
Condition: Standard
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Excerpt

andlt;Bandgt;Chapter 1andlt;/Bandgt;andlt;BRandgt;andlt;BRandgt;andlt;Bandgt;THE FIRST MORNINGandlt;/Bandgt;andlt;BRandgt;andlt;BRandgt;This is the most beautiful place on earth.andlt;BRandgt;andlt;BRandgt;There are many such places. Every man, every woman, carries in heart and mind the image of the ideal place, the fight place, the one true home, known or unknown, actual or visionary. A houseboat in Kashmir, a view down Atlantic Avenue in Brooklyn, a gray gothic farmhouse two stories high at the end of a red dog road in the Allegheny Mountains, a cabin on the shore of a blue lake in spruce and fir country, a greasy alley near the Hoboken waterfront, or even, possibly, for those of a less demanding sensibility, the world to be seen from a comfortable apartment high in the tender, velvety smog of Manhattan, Chicago, Paris, Tokyo, Rio or Rome — there's no limit to the human capacity for the homing sentiment. Theologians, sky pilots, astronauts have even felt the appeal of home calling to them from up above, in the cold black outback of intersteller space.andlt;BRandgt;andlt;BRandgt;For myself I'll take Moab, Utah. I don't mean the town itself, of course, but the country which surrounds it — the canyonlands. The slickrock desert. The red dust and the burnt cliffs and the lonely sky — all that which lies beyond the end of the roads.andlt;BRandgt;andlt;BRandgt;The choice became apparent to me this morning when I stepped out of a Park Service housetrailer — my caravan — to watch for the first time in my life the sun come up over the hoodoo stone of Arches National Monument.andlt;BRandgt;andlt;BRandgt;I wasn't able to see much of it last night. After driving all day from Albuquerque — 450 miles — I reached Moab after dark in cold, windy, clouded weather. At park headquarters north of town I met the superintendent and the chief ranger, the only permanent employees, except for one maintenance man, in this particular unit of America's national park system. After coffee they gave me a key to the housetrailer and directions on how to reach it; I am required to live and work not at headquarters but at this one-man station some twenty miles back in the interior, on my own. The way I wanted it, naturally, or I'd never have asked for the Job.andlt;BRandgt;andlt;BRandgt;Leaving the headquarters area and the lights of Moab, I drove twelve miles farther north on the highway until I came to a dirt road on the right, where a small wooden sign pointed the way: Arches National Monument Eight Miles. I left the pavement, turned cast into the howling wilderness. Wind roaring out of the northwest, black clouds across the stars — all I could see were clumps of brush and scattered junipers along the roadside. Then another modest signboard:andlt;BRandgt;andlt;BRandgt;WARNING: QUICKSAND DO NOT CROSS WASH WHEN WATER IS RUNNINGandlt;BRandgt;andlt;BRandgt;The wash looked perfectly dry in my headlights. I drove down, across, up the other side and on into the night. Glimpses of weird humps of pale rock on either side, like petrified elephants, dinosaurs, stone-age hobgoblins. Now and then something alive scurried across the road: kangaroo mice, a jackrabbit, an animal that looked like a cross between a raccoon and a squirrel — the ringtail cat. Farther on a pair of mule deer started from the brush and bounded obliquely through the beams of my lights, raising puffs of dust which the wind, moving faster than my pickup truck, ought and carried ahead of me out of sight into the dark. The road, narrow and rocky, twisted sharply left and right, dipped in and out of tight ravines, climbing by degrees toward a summit which I would see only in the light of the coming day.andlt;BRandgt;andlt;BRandgt;Snow was swirling through the air when I crossed the unfenced line and passed the boundary marker of the park. A quarter-mile beyond I found the ranger station — a wide place in the road, an informational display under a lean-to shelter, and fifty yards away the little tin government housetrailer where I would be living for the next six months.andlt;BRandgt;andlt;BRandgt;A cold night, a cold wind, the snow falling like confetti. In the lights of the truck I unlocked the housetrailer, got out bedroll and baggage and moved in. By flashlight I found the bed, unrolled my sleeping bag, pulled off my boots and crawled in and went to sleep at once. The last I knew was the shaking of the trailer in the wind and the sound, from inside, of hungry mice scampering around with the good news that their long lean lonesome winter was over — their friend and provider had finally arrived.andlt;BRandgt;andlt;BRandgt;This morning I awake before sunrise, stick my head out of the sack, peer through a frosty window at a scene dim and vague with flowing mists, dark fantastic shapes looming beyond. An unlikely landscape.andlt;BRandgt;andlt;BRandgt;I get up, moving about in long underwear and socks, stooping carefully under the low ceiling and lower doorways of the housetrailer, a machine for living built so efficiently and compactly there's hardly room for a man to breathe. An iron lung it is, with windows and venetian blinds.andlt;BRandgt;andlt;BRandgt;The mice are silent, watching me from their hiding places, but the wind is still blowing and outside the ground is covered with snow. Cold as a tomb, a jail, a cave; I lie down on the dusty floor, on the cold linoleum sprinkled with mouse turds, and light the pilot on the butane heater. Once this thing gets going the place warms up fast, in a dense unhealthy way, with a layer of heat under the ceiling where my head is and nothing but frigid air from the knees down. But we've got all the indispensable conveniences: gas cookstove, gas refrigerator, hot water heater, sink with running water (if the pipes aren't frozen), storage cabinets and shelves, everything within ann's reach of everything else. The gas comes from two steel bottles in a shed outside; the water comes by gravity flow from a tank buried in a hill close by. Quite luxurious for the wilds. There's even a shower stall and a flush toilet with a dead rat in the bowl. Pretty soft. My poor mother raised five children without any of these luxuries and might be doing without them yet if it hadn't been for Hitler, war and general prosperity.andlt;BRandgt;andlt;BRandgt;Time to get dressed, get out and have a look at the lay of the land, fix a breakfast. I try to pull on my boots but they're stiff as iron from the cold. I light a burner on the stove and hold the boots upside down above the flame until they are malleable enough to force my feet into. I put on a coat and step outside. Into the center of the world, God's navel, Abbey's country, the red wasteland.andlt;BRandgt;andlt;BRandgt;The, sun is not yet in sight but signs of the advent are plain to see. Lavender clouds sail like a fleet of ships across the pale green dawn; each cloud, planed flat on the wind, has a base of fiery gold. Southeast, twenty miles by line of sight, stand the peaks of the Sierra La Sal, twelve to thirteen thousand feet above sea level, all covered with snow and rosy in the morning sunlight. The air is dry and clear as well as cold; the last fogbanks left over from last night's storm are scudding away like ghosts, fading into nothing before the wind and the sunrise.andlt;BRandgt;andlt;BRandgt;The view is open and perfect in all directions except to the west where the ground rises and the skyline is only a few hundred yards away. Looking toward the mountains I can see the dark gorge of the Colorado River five or six miles away, carved through the sandstone mesa, though nothing of the river itself down inside the gorge. Southward, on the far side of the fiver, lies the Moab valley between thousand-foot walls of rock, with the town of Moab somewhere on the valley floor, too small to be seen from here. Beyond the Moab valley is more canyon and tableland stretching away to the Blue Mountains fifty miles south. On the north and northwest I see the Roan Cliffs and the Book Cliffs, the two-level face of the Uinta Plateau. Along the foot of those cliffs, maybe thirty miles off, invisible from where I stand, runs U.S. 6-50, a major east-west artery of commerce, traffic and rubbish, and the main line of the Denver-Rio Grande Railroad. To the east, under the spreading sunrise, are more mesas, more canyons, league on league of red cliff and arid tablelands, extending through purple haze over the bulging curve of the planet to the ranges of Colorado — a sea of desert.andlt;BRandgt;andlt;BRandgt;Within this vast perimeter, in the middle ground and foreground of the picture, a rather personal demesne, are the 33,000 acres of Arches National Monument of which I am now sole inhabitant, usufructuary, observer and custodian.andlt;BRandgt;andlt;BRandgt;What are the Arches? From my place in front of the housetrailer I can see several of the hundred or more of them which have been discovered in the park. These are natural arches, holes in the rock, windows in stone, no two alike, as varied in form as in dimension. They range in size from holes just big enough to walk through to openings large enough to contain the dome of the Capitol building in Washington, D.G. Some resemble jug handles or flying buttresses, others natural bridges but with this technical distinction: a natural bridge spans a watercourse — a natural arch does not. The arches were formed through hundreds of thousands of years by the weathering of the huge sandstone walls, or fins, in which they are found. Not the work of a cosmic hand, nor sculptured by sand-beating winds, as many people prefer to believe, the arches came into being and continue to come into being through the modest wedging action of rainwater, melting snow, frost, and ice, aided by gravity. In color they shade from off-white through buff, pink, brown and red, tones which also change With the time of day and the moods of the light, the weather, the sky.andlt;BRandgt;andlt;BRandgt;Standing there, gaping at this monstrous and inhuman spectacle of rock and cloud and sky and space, I feel a ridiculous greed and possessiveness come over me. I want to know it all, possess it all, embrace the entire scene intimately, deeply, totally, as a man desires a beautiful woman. An insane wish? Perhaps not — at least there's nothing else, no one human, to dispute possession with me.andlt;BRandgt;andlt;BRandgt;The snow-covered ground glimmers with a dull blue light, reflecting the sky and the approaching sunrise. Leading away from me the narrow dirt road, an alluring and primitive track into no where, meanders down the slope and toward the heart of the labyrinth of naked stone. Near the first group of arches, looming over a bend in the road, is a balanced rock about fifty feet high, mounted on a pedestal of equal height; it looks like a head from Easter Island, a stone god or a petrified ogre.andlt;BRandgt;andlt;BRandgt;Like a god, like an ogre? The personification of the natural is exactly the tendency I wish to suppress in myself, to eliminate for good. I am here not only to evade for a while the clamor and filth and confusion of the cultural apparatus but also to confront, immediately and directly if it's possible, the bare bones of existence, the elemental and fundamental, the bedrock which sustains us. I want to be able to look at and into a juniper tree, a piece of quartz, a vulture, a spider, and see it as it is in itself, devoid of all humanly ascribed qualities, anti-Kantian, even the categories of scientific description. To meet God or Medusa face to face, even if it means risking everything human in myself. I dream of a hard and brutal mysticism in which the naked self merges with a nonhuman world and yet somehow survives still intact, individual, separate. Paradox and bedrock.andlt;BRandgt;andlt;BRandgt;Well — the sun will be up in a few minutes and I haven't even begun to make coffee. I take more baggage from my pickup, the grub box and cooking gear, go back in the trailer and start breakfast. Simply breathing, in a place like this, arouses the appetite. The orange juice is frozen, the milk slushy with ice. Still chilly enough inside the trailer to turn my breath to vapor, When the first rays of the sun strike the cliffs I fill a mug with steaming coffee and sit in the doorway facing the sunrise, hungry for the warmth.andlt;BRandgt;andlt;BRandgt;Suddenly it comes, the flaming globe, blazing on the pinnacles and minarets and balanced rocks, on the canyon walls and through the windows in the sandstone fins. We greet each other, sun and I, across the black void of ninety-three million miles. The snow glitters between us, acres of diamonds almost painful to look at. Within an hour all the snow exposed to the sunlight will be gone and the rock will be damp and steaming. Within minutes, even as I watch, melting snow begins to drip from the branches of a juniper nearby; drops of water streak slowly down the side of the trailerhouse.andlt;BRandgt;andlt;BRandgt;I am not alone after all. Three ravens are wheeling near the balanced rock, squawking at each other and at the dawn. I'm sure they're as delighted by the return of the sun as I am and I wish I knew the language, I'd sooner exchange ideas with the birds on earth than learn to carry on intergalactic communications with some obscure race of humanoids on a satellite planet from the world of Betelgeuse. First things first. The ravens cry out in husky voices, blue-black wings flapping against the' golden sky. Over my shoulder comes the sizzle and smell of frying bacon.andlt;BRandgt;andlt;BRandgt;That's the way it was this morning.andlt;BRandgt;andlt;BRandgt;Copyright andamp;copy; 1968 by Edward Abbey

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Ben Thomas, January 1, 2013 (view all comments by Ben Thomas)
This book, infused with just the right amount of humor, politics, and truth, is a wonderful commentary on the American West. The deserts, rivers, canyons, and rock formations Ed Abbey describes during his summers as a ranger at Arches National Park make you terribly desirous to drop what you're doing and drive all through the night to go see the Utah's rocky menagerie up close and personal. Having spent all summer gallivanting about the West, this book was a fantastic way to reminisce and put the beauty of the West into perspective. We have to protect it because if we don't, there will be no place to escape when the cities become too much, as Abbey says. A must read for anyone interested in a rugged, bearded man's thoughts on canyons, Caterpillar, and chunky bean soup.
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Ecocrit, February 10, 2010 (view all comments by Ecocrit)
This is perhaps one of the most important books for the postmodern literary era. While it may not appeal to a television oriented audience which demands constant bombardment with loud noises and commercials it is essential to gaining an understanding of the problematic relationship that modern society shares with nature. These views were embedded during the romantic period and before and foster an unhealthy commodifed view of nature as a place to "find yourself". Abbey struggles to rise above his western ensnarement and sing in a voice all his own. To the reader who did not like Abbey's uncommon style employed in this narrative, I advise "The Monkey Wrench Gang". It is a more plot-driven exploration of the same topics seen in this book. Or you could just sit on a couch and eat Cheetos while watching television until you die of a heart attack.
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botoxymoron, January 10, 2010 (view all comments by botoxymoron)
I'll be honest, this book annoyed the hell outta me. I'm just not the type of person to like a book that is all about the scenery of a place. I like plots, conflicts, not 'blah blah blah using a flashlight separates you from nature'. That annoyed me too. Why can't someone have nature AND technology? No, stories ALWAYS have to be about how we separates ourselves and crap. Makes me sick. It might just because I'm not nostalgic for times where there was barely any technology, because I was born around technology. I don't believe it separates you from nature though. Not at all. Especially since the guy is going on about a flashlight. Fine, we shall do as this guy says, and walk around at night without a flashlight. Lets see how many people die/get injured from falling and breaking their necks, to 'be close to nature'. I didn't like it, but I guess people get distracted by pretty words very easily.
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Product Details

ISBN:
9780671695880
Author:
Abbey, Edward
Publisher:
Touchstone Books
Illustrator:
Parnall, Peter
Location:
New York :
Subject:
General
Subject:
Literary
Subject:
Biography
Subject:
Biology
Subject:
Authors, American
Subject:
Novelists, American
Subject:
Environmentalists
Subject:
Arches national park (utah)
Subject:
Abbey, edward, 1927-1989
Subject:
Desert biology
Subject:
Park rangers.
Subject:
Arches National Park
Subject:
General Nature
Subject:
Novelists, American -- 20th century.
Subject:
Abbey, Edward
Subject:
Nature Studies-General
Subject:
Biology-Reference
Subject:
Environmental Conservation & Protection
Subject:
edward abbey; autobiography; environmental issues; political issues; philsophy; activism; environmental activism; national parks; search and rescue; southwest; Colorado; forensic investigation
Copyright:
Edition Number:
1st Touchstone ed.
Edition Description:
B102
Series Volume:
no. 68-0204430
Publication Date:
January 1990
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
20 b-w drawings
Pages:
288
Dimensions:
8.44 x 5.5 in 8.96 oz

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Desert Solitaire Used Trade Paper
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Product details 288 pages Touchstone - English 9780671695880 Reviews:
"Staff Pick" by ,

This memoir by Edward Abbey recounts his years as a park ranger working at Arches National Park in Utah. Abbey's keen eye and sharp writing clearly impart the beauty of the desert and the importance of preserving our limited natural resources. His reflections and rants on American environmentalism, the auto and mining industries, and the impact they have on our national park system ring just as true today as when the book was published in 1968.

"Review" by , "[Desert Solitaire] is the outgrowth of a bitter awareness of all that has been lost, all that is being lost, all that is going to be lost in that glory of our American democracy, our system of national parks. Designed to set aside, for all the people, wild areas of special beauty, this system originated with a twofold purpose: to serve the public and to preserve the areas. These two goals are now in head-on collision. For 'to serve the public' has come to mean 'to serve the public in automobiles'."
"Review" by , "What entertains many and exasperates others is Abbey's unique prose voice. Alternately misanthropic and sentimental, enraged and hilarious, it is the voice of a full-blooded man airing his passions."
"Review" by , "Like a ride on a bucking bronco...rough, tough, combative. The author is a rebel and an eloquent loner. His is a passionately felt, deeply poetic book...set down in a lean, racing prose, in a close-knit style of power and beauty."
"Synopsis" by , Hailed by andlt;I andgt;The New York Times andlt;/Iandgt;as and#8220;a passionately felt, deeply poetic book,and#8221; the moving autobiographical work of Edward Abbey, considered the Thoreau of the American West, and his passion for the southwestern wilderness.andlt;brandgt;andlt;brandgt;andlt;Iandgt;Desert Solitaire andlt;/Iandgt;is a collection of vignettes about life in the wilderness and the nature of the desert itself by park ranger and conservationist, Edward Abbey. The bookandlt;B andgt; andlt;/Bandgt;details the unique adventures and conflicts the author faces, from dealing with the damage caused by development of the land or excessive tourism, to discovering a dead body. However andlt;Iandgt;Desert Solitaire andlt;/Iandgt;is not just a collection of one manand#8217;s stories, the book is also a philosophical memoir, full of Abbeyand#8217;s reflections on the desert as a paradox, at once beautiful and liberating, but also isolating and cruel. Often compared to Thoreauand#8217;s andlt;I andgt;Waldenandlt;/Iandgt;, andlt;Iandgt;Desert Solitaire andlt;/Iandgt;is a powerful discussion of lifeand#8217;s mysteries set against the stirring backdrop of the American southwestern wilderness.
"Synopsis" by , When Desert Solitaire was first published in 1968, it became the focus of a nationwide cult. Rude and sensitive. Thought-provoking and mystical. Angry and loving. Both Abbey and this book are all of these and more. Here, the legendary author of The Monkey Wrench Gang, Abbey's Road and many other critically acclaimed books vividly captures the essence of his life during three seasons as a park ranger in southeastern Utah. This is a rare view of a quest to experience nature in its purest form — the silence, the struggle, the overwhelming beauty. But this is also the gripping, anguished cry of a man of character who challenges the growing exploitation of the wilderness by oil and mining interests, as well as by the tourist industry.

Abbey's observations and challenges remain as relevant now as the day he wrote them. Today, Desert Solitaire asks if any of our incalculable natural treasures can be saved before the bulldozers strike again.

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