Murakami Sale
 
 

Recently Viewed clear list


Q&A | August 19, 2014

Richard Kadrey: IMG Powell’s Q&A: Richard Kadrey



Describe your latest book. The Getaway God is the sixth book in the Sandman Slim series. In it, the very unholy nephilim, James Stark, aka Sandman... Continue »
  1. $17.49 Sale Hardcover add to wish list

spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$7.95
List price: $14.95
Used Trade Paper
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
Qty Store Section
3 Burnside Literature- Featured Titles
6 Burnside DISP- OLD FAVORITES507ENDCAP, 509ENDCAP
22 Local Warehouse Literature- A to Z

The Known World

by

The Known World Cover

ISBN13: 9780060557553
ISBN10: 0060557559
Condition: Standard
All Product Details

 

 

Excerpt

Chapter One

Liaison. The Warmth of Family.
Stormy Weather.

The evening his master died he worked again well after he ended the day for the other adults, his own wife among them, and sent them back with hunger and tiredness to their cabins. The young ones, his son among them, had been sent out of the fields an hour or so before the adults, to prepare the late supper and, if there was time enough, to play in the few minutes of sun that were left. When he, Moses, finally freed himself of the ancient and brittle harness that connected him to the oldest mule his master owned, all that was left of the sun was a five-inch-long memory of red orange laid out in still waves across the horizon between two mountains on the left and one on the right. He had been in the fields for all of fourteen hours. He paused before leaving the fields as the evening quiet wrapped itself about him. The mule quivered, wanting home and rest. Moses closed his eyes and bent down and took a pinch of the soil and ate it with no more thought than if it were a spot of cornbread. He worked the dirt around in his mouth and swallowed, leaning his head back and opening his eyes in time to see the strip of sun fade to dark blue and then to nothing. He was the only man in the realm, slave or free, whoate dirt, but while the bondage women, particularly the pregnant ones, ate it for some incomprehensible need, for that something that ash cakes and apples and fatback did not give their bodies, he ate it not only to discover the strengths and weaknesses of the field, but because the eating of it tied him to the only thing in his small world that meant almost as much as his own life.

This was July, and July dirt tasted even more like sweetened metal than the dirt of June or May. Something in the growing crops unleashed a metallic life that only began to dissipate in mid-August, and by harvest time that life would be gone altogether, replaced by a sour moldiness he associated with the coming of fall and winter, the end of a relationship he had begun with the first taste of dirt back in March, before the first hard spring rain. Now, with the sun gone and no moon and the darkness having taken a nice hold of him, he walked to the end of the row, holding the mule by the tail. In the clearing he dropped the tail and moved around the mule toward the barn.

The mule followed him, and after he had prepared the animal for the night and came out, Moses smelled the coming of rain. He breathed deeply, feeling it surge through him. Believing he was alone, he smiled. He knelt down to be closer to the earth and breathed deeply some more. Finally, when the effect began to dwindle, he stood and turned away, for the third time that week, from the path that led to the narrow lane of the quarters with its people and his own cabin, his woman and his boy. His wife knew enough now not to wait for him to come and eat with them. On a night with the moon he could see some of the smoke rising from the world that was the lane - home and food and rest and what passed in many cabins for the life of family. He turned his head slightly to the right and made out what he thought was the sound of playing children, but when he turned his head back, he could hear far more clearly the last bird of the day as it evening-chirped in the small forest far off to the left.

He went straight ahead, to the farthest edge of the cornfields to a patch of woods that had yielded nothing of value since the day his master bought it from a white man who had gone broke and returned to Ireland. "I did well over there," that man lied to his people back in Ireland, his dying wife standing hunched over beside him, "but I longed for all of you and for the wealth of my homeland." The patch of woods of no more than three acres did yield some soft, blue grass that no animal would touch and many trees that no one could identify. Just before Moses stepped into the woods, the rain began, and as he walked on the rain became heavier. Well into the forest the rain came in torrents through the trees and the mighty summer leaves and after a bit Moses stopped and held out his hands and collected water that he washed over his face. Then he undressed down to his nakedness and lay down. To keep the rain out of his nose, he rolled up his shirt and placed it under his head so that it tilted just enough for the rain to flow down about his face. When he was an old man and rheumatism chained up his body, he would look back and blame the chains on evenings such as these, and on nights when he lost himself completely and fell asleep and didn't come to until morning, covered with dew.

The ground was almost soaked. The leaves seemed to soften the hard rain as it fell and it hit his body and face with no more power than the gentle tapping of fingers. He opened his mouth; it was rare for him and the rain to meet up like this. His eyes had remained open, and after taking in all that he could without turning his head, he took up his thing and did it. When he was done, after a few strokes, he closed his eyes, turned on his side and dozed. After a half hour or so the rain stopped abruptly...

Copyright © 2003 by Edward P. Jones

What Our Readers Are Saying

Add a comment for a chance to win!
Average customer rating based on 22 comments:

Witz, June 27, 2014 (view all comments by Witz)
This is "big story" novel that builds slowly and pulls the reader into the lives of slaves who have emulated their masters, masters who have done everything possible to break-down the family unit and and one slave in particular who has became a new kind of plantation master. Positively all- encompassing and breakthrough scenes of life and strife which I remember now years after reading.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(1 of 2 readers found this comment helpful)
lukas, March 17, 2014 (view all comments by lukas)
This won the Pulitzer and was in a Times list of the best American novels since 1980. So maybe I went in with unreasonable expectations. I did appreciate this story of race and the wages of slavery in the South, with its echoes of Faulkner, Morrison and Twain, without really getting into it.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(1 of 2 readers found this comment helpful)
lukas, March 17, 2014 (view all comments by lukas)
This won the Pulitzer and was in a Times list of the best American novels since 1980. So maybe I went in with unreasonable expectations. I did appreciate this story of race and the wages of slavery in the South, with its echoes of Faulkner, Morrison and Twain, without really getting into it.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(1 of 2 readers found this comment helpful)
View all 22 comments

Product Details

ISBN:
9780060557553
Author:
Jones, Edward P.
Publisher:
Harper Paperbacks
Author:
by Edward P. Jones
Subject:
General
Subject:
Literary
Subject:
Historical - General
Subject:
Ethnic Studies - African American Studies - General
Subject:
General Fiction
Subject:
Literature-A to Z
Copyright:
Edition Number:
Reprint ed.
Edition Description:
Trade PB
Publication Date:
May 25, 2004
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
432
Dimensions:
8.06x5.32x1.00 in. .73 lbs.

Other books you might like

  1. The Curious Incident of the Dog in...
    Used Trade Paper $2.50
  2. The Kite Runner
    Used Trade Paper $4.50
  3. Middlesex
    Used Trade Paper $4.95
  4. Empire Falls: A Novel
    Used Trade Paper $5.95
  5. The Great Fire
    Used Trade Paper $4.50
  6. Gilead
    Used Trade Paper $5.50

Related Subjects


Featured Titles » Literature
Featured Titles » Pulitzer Prize Winners
Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z
Fiction and Poetry » Literature » Featured Titles

The Known World Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$7.95 In Stock
Product details 432 pages Amistad Press - English 9780060557553 Reviews:
"Review" by , "This extraordinary novel [is] the best new work of American fiction to cross my desk in years."
"Review" by , "[S]tunning....With hard-won wisdom and hugely effective understatement, Mr. Jones explores the unsettling, contradiction-prone world of a Virginia slaveholder who happens to be black."
"Review" by , "[K]aleidoscopic....Jones has written a book of tremendous moral intricacy: no relationship here is left unaltered by the bonds of ownership, and liberty eludes most of Manchester County's residents, not just its slaves."
"Review" by , "Jones's prose can be rather static and his phrasings ponderous, but his narrative achieves crushing momentum through sheer accumulation of detail, unusual historical insight and generous character writing."
"Review" by , "[A]mbitious....A fascinating look at a painful theme, this book is an ideal choice for book clubs. Highly recommended."
"Review" by , "A masterpiece that deserves a place in the American literary canon."
"Review" by , "If Jones. . .keeps up this level of work, he’ll equal the best fiction Toni Morrison has written about being black in America."
"Review" by , "Brilliant...Jones' novel movingly evokes one small landscape of a larger map that so stubbornly yields up its truths today."
"Review" by , "The Known World is a great novel, one that may eventually be placed with the best of American Literature."
"Review" by , "A grand and inspired work of historical fiction. . .[It] deserves every word of praise that comes its way."
"Review" by , "Complex, beautifully written, and breathtaking...the book will knock the wind out of you with the depth of its compassion." QBR: The Black Book Review
"Review" by , "Heartbreaking....fascinating."
"Review" by , "Astonishingly rich...The particulars and consequences of the 'right' of humans to own other humans are dramatized with unprecedented ingenuity and intensity, in a harrowing tale that scarcely ever raises its voice...It should be a major prize contender."
"Review" by , "A profoundly beautiful and insightful look at American slavery and human nature."
"Review" by , "Vivid....[An] epic novel."
"Review" by , "An exemplar of historical fiction...[it] will subdue your preconceptions, enrich your perceptions and trouble your sleep....The way Jones tells this story...recalls Cormac McCarthy, William Faulkner and Gabriel Garcia Marquez."
spacer
spacer
  • back to top
Follow us on...




Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.