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This title in other editions

Every Tongue Got to Confess: Negro Folk-Tales from the Gulf States

by

Every Tongue Got to Confess: Negro Folk-Tales from the Gulf States Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

“ What treasures these are— mordantly clever and quintessentially human stories about God and the creation of the black race, the devil, preachers wily and foolish, animals, the battle between the sexes, and slaves who outsmart their masters. Invaluable tales of mischief and wisdom, spirit and hope.” — Booklist “ Imagine the situations in which these speech acts occur. Recall a front stoop, juke joint, funeral, wedding, barbershop, kitchen: the music, noise, communal energy, and release. Dream. Participate the way you do when you allow a song to transport you, all kinds of songs, from hip-hop rap to Bach to Monk, each bearing its different history of sounds and silences.” — from the Foreword by John Edgar Wideman Storytelling is an essential element of many cultural traditions— -especially those that have had to carve their identities in an unfriendly setting and struggle to hold their communities together. The African-American storytelling tradition is one of the strongest, yet this astonishing collection of African-American folk tales has lingered in archival obscurity for decades— until now. In the late 1920s, with the support of Franz Boas of Columbia University, a circle of friends that included members of the Harlem Renaissance, and a wealthy patron named Charlotte Osgood Mason, Zora Neale Hurston set out to collect the folk tales of the rural south. Travelling from Florida to Alabama to Georgia and Louisiana, Hurston spoke with men and women, young and old, domestics and mine workers, housewives and jailbirds, collecting their tales word for word. She wanted to preserve a language that was unique, pure, and lasting. “ I have tried to be asexact as possible. Keep to the exact dialect as closely as I could, having the story teller to tell it to me word for word as I write. This after it has been told to me off hand until I know it myself. But the writing down from the lips is to insure the correct dialect and wording so that I shall not let myself creep in unconsciously.” (from the Introduction by Carla Kaplan, p. xxvii) The result of Hurston’ s travels is this unique and extensive volume of nearly five hundred African-American folk tales grouped in categories ranging from God Tales to Devil Tales, from John and Massa Tales to Heaven Tales and School Tales. The stories poignantly capture the colorful, pain-filled, and sometimes magical world that surrounded them, revealing attitudes about faith, love, family, slavery, race, and community. Yet the tales are laced with humor from which no one is spared. In one story God is accused of mistaking a white man for a Negro; in another, a watermelon is so large that when it bursts it floods the river and drowns the townsfolk; and in yet another, the devil tries to make a field of cabbage like God has done, but he can’ t quite get it right and ends up with a field of tobacco. Hurston’ s determination to capture the authentic language of “ the Negro farthest down” (xxvi) is a vital contribution to African-American letters. These folktales were not just Zora Neale Hurston’ s first love; they paved the way for generations of African-American writers, preserving a language whose poetry thrives to this day.

Review:

"In compiling Every Tongue Got to Confess Hurston clearly placed as much emphasis on imagination as on authenticity. She gives these stories a sharp immediacy and a fine supply of down-to-earth humor." New York Times

Review:

"In Every Tongue Got to Confess, the book's great value for us today is in the way it returns us to Hurston's literary and academic roots as a folklorist and anthropologist and to the people and material which inspired and enriched her fiction." Los Angeles Times

Review:

"In 1927, with the support of Franz Boas, the dean of American anthropologists, Hurston traveled the Deep South collecting stories from black laborers, farmers, craftsmen and idlers....Acting the part of the good anthropologist, Hurston is scrupulously impersonal, and, as a result, the tales bear few traces of her inimitable voice." Publishers Weekly

Review:

"Over 500 tales are presented as Hurston left them, in their vernacular dialect with no changes to grammar, spelling, punctuation, syntax, or dialect....With this new collection, Hurston provides an even greater sense of the black oral tradition, which demands appreciation and admiration. Highly recommended." Library Journal

Review:

"[W]hat treasures these are - mordantly clever and quintessentially human stories about God and the creation of the black race, the devil, preachers wily and foolish, animals, the battle between the sexes, and slaves who outsmart their masters. Invaluable tales of mischief and wisdom, spirit and hope." Booklist

Synopsis:

Weaving a vibrant tapestry of the rural South, this extensive volume of African-American folklore was collected in the late 1920s by Zora Neale Hurston on her travels through the Gulf States.

Synopsis:

Every Tongue Got to Confess is an extensive volume of African American folklore that Zora Neale Hurston collected on her travels through the Gulf States in the late 1920s.

The bittersweet and often hilarious tales — which range from longer narratives about God, the Devil, white folk, and mistaken identity to witty one-liners — reveal attitudes about faith, love, family, slavery, race, and community. Together, this collection of nearly 500 folktales weaves a vibrant tapestry that celebrates African American life in the rural South and represents a major part of Zora Neale Hurston's literary legacy.

About the Author

Zora Neale Hurston (1891-1960) was a novelist, folklorist, and anthropologist whose fictional and factual accounts of black heritage are unparalleled. She was the author of many books, including Their Eyes Were Watching God, Dust Tracks on a Road, Tell My Horse, and Mules and Men.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780060934545
Subtitle:
Negro Folk-tales from the Gulf States
Editor:
Kaplan, Carla
Foreword by:
Wideman, John Edgar
Foreword:
Wideman, John Edgar
Author:
Hurston, Zora Neale
Author:
by Zora Neale Hurston
Foreword:
Wideman, John Edgar
Author:
Kaplan, Carla
Publisher:
Harper Perennial
Location:
New York
Subject:
Anthropology - Cultural
Subject:
Folklore & Mythology - Folklore
Subject:
American - African American & Black
Subject:
Southern states
Subject:
Tales
Subject:
Fairy Tales, Folklore & Mythology
Subject:
African Americans
Subject:
Ethnic Studies - African American Studies - General
Subject:
American - African American
Subject:
African-American & Black
Subject:
African Americans - Southern States
Subject:
Tales -- Southern States.
Subject:
Mythology-Folklore and Storytelling
Copyright:
Edition Number:
1st Perennial ed.
Edition Description:
Trade PB
Series Volume:
1658
Publication Date:
20021001
Binding:
Paperback
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
320
Dimensions:
8.10x5.32x.81 in. .52 lbs.

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Related Subjects

Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z
History and Social Science » African American Studies » Folklore
History and Social Science » African American Studies » General
History and Social Science » Anthropology » Cultural Anthropology
Humanities » Literary Criticism » General
Humanities » Mythology » Folklore and Storytelling
Humanities » Mythology » North American

Every Tongue Got to Confess: Negro Folk-Tales from the Gulf States Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$7.50 In Stock
Product details 320 pages Perennial - English 9780060934545 Reviews:
"Review" by , "In compiling Every Tongue Got to Confess Hurston clearly placed as much emphasis on imagination as on authenticity. She gives these stories a sharp immediacy and a fine supply of down-to-earth humor."
"Review" by , "In Every Tongue Got to Confess, the book's great value for us today is in the way it returns us to Hurston's literary and academic roots as a folklorist and anthropologist and to the people and material which inspired and enriched her fiction."
"Review" by , "In 1927, with the support of Franz Boas, the dean of American anthropologists, Hurston traveled the Deep South collecting stories from black laborers, farmers, craftsmen and idlers....Acting the part of the good anthropologist, Hurston is scrupulously impersonal, and, as a result, the tales bear few traces of her inimitable voice."
"Review" by , "Over 500 tales are presented as Hurston left them, in their vernacular dialect with no changes to grammar, spelling, punctuation, syntax, or dialect....With this new collection, Hurston provides an even greater sense of the black oral tradition, which demands appreciation and admiration. Highly recommended."
"Review" by , "[W]hat treasures these are - mordantly clever and quintessentially human stories about God and the creation of the black race, the devil, preachers wily and foolish, animals, the battle between the sexes, and slaves who outsmart their masters. Invaluable tales of mischief and wisdom, spirit and hope."
"Synopsis" by , Weaving a vibrant tapestry of the rural South, this extensive volume of African-American folklore was collected in the late 1920s by Zora Neale Hurston on her travels through the Gulf States.

"Synopsis" by , Every Tongue Got to Confess is an extensive volume of African American folklore that Zora Neale Hurston collected on her travels through the Gulf States in the late 1920s.

The bittersweet and often hilarious tales — which range from longer narratives about God, the Devil, white folk, and mistaken identity to witty one-liners — reveal attitudes about faith, love, family, slavery, race, and community. Together, this collection of nearly 500 folktales weaves a vibrant tapestry that celebrates African American life in the rural South and represents a major part of Zora Neale Hurston's literary legacy.

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