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1 Beaverton Literature- A to Z

Love Medicine

by

Love Medicine Cover

ISBN13: 9780060975548
ISBN10: 0060975547
Condition: Standard
All Product Details

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Excerpt

Chapter One

The World's Greatest Fishermen
(1981)

The morning before Easter Sunday, June Kashpaw was walking down the clogged main street of oil boomtown Williston, North Dakota, killing time before the noon bus arrived that would take her home. She was a long-legged Chippewa woman, aged hard in every way except how she moved. Probably it was the way she moved, easy as a young girl on slimhard legs, that caught the eye of the man who rapped at her from inside the window of the Rigger Bar. He looked familiar,like a lot of people looked familiar to her. She had seen so many come and go. He hooked his arm, inviting her to enter,and she did so without hesitation, thinking only that she might tip down one or two with him and then get her bags to meet the bus. She wanted, at least, to see if she actually knew him. Even through the watery glass she could see that he wasn't all that old and that his chest was thickly padded in dark red nylon and expensive down.

There were cartons of colored eggs on the bar, each glowing like a jewel in its wad of cellophane. He was peeling one, sky blue as a robin's, palming it while he thumbed the peel aside, when she walked through the door. Although the day was overcast, the snow itself reflected such light that she was momentarily blinded. It was like going underwater. What she walked toward more than anything else was that blue egg in the white hand, a beacon in the murky air.

He ordered a beer for her, a Blue Ribbon, saying she deserved a prize for being the best thing he'd seen for days. He peeled an egg for her, a pink one, saying it matched her turtleneck. She told him it was no turtleneck. You called these things shells. He said he would peel that for her, too, if she wanted, then he grinned at the bartender and handed her the naked egg.

June's hand was colder from the outdoors than the egg, and so she had to let it sit in her fingers for a minute before it stopped feeling rubbery warm. Eating it, she found out how hungry she was. The last of the money that the man before this one had given her was spent for the ticket. She didn't know exactly when she'd eaten last. This man seemed impressed, when her egg was finished, and peeled her another one just like it. She ate the egg. Then another egg. The bartender looked at her. She shrugged and tapped out a long menthol cigarette from a white plastic case inscribed with her initials in golden letters. She took a breath of smoke then leaned toward her companion through the broken shells.

"What's happening?" she said. "Where's the party?"

Her hair was rolled carefully, sprayed for the bus trip, and her eyes were deeply watchful in their sea-blue flumes of shadow. She was deciding.

"I don't got much time until my bus . . ." she said.

"Forget the bus!" He stood up and grabbed her arm. "We're gonna party. Hear? Who's stopping us? We're having a good time!"

She couldn't help notice, when he paid up, that he had a good-sized wad of money in a red rubber band like the kind that holds bananas together in the supermarket. That roll helped. But what was more important, she had a feeling. The eggs were lucky. And he had a good-natured slowness about him that seemed different. He could be different, she thought. The bus ticket would stay good, maybe forever. They weren't expecting her up home on the reservation. She didn't even have a man there, except the one she'd divorced. Gordie. If she got desperate he would still send her money. So she went on to the next bar with this man in the dark red vest. They drove down the street in his Silverado pickup. He was a mud engineer. Andy. She didn't tell him she'd known any mud engineers before or about that one she'd heard was killed by a pressurized hose. The hose had shot up into his stomach from underground.

The thought of that death, although she'd only been half acquainted with the man, always put a panicky, dry lump in her throat. It was the hose, she thought, snaking up suddenly from its unseen nest, the idea of that hose striking like a live thing, that was fearful. With one blast it had taken out his insides. And that too made her throat ache, although she'd heard of worse things. It was that moment, that one moment, of realizing you were totally empty. He must have felt that. Sometimes, alone in her room in the dark, she thought she knew what it might be like.

Later on, the noise failing around them at a crowded bar, she closed her eyes for a moment against the smoke and saw that hose pop suddenly through black earth with its killing breath.

"Ahhhhh," she said, surprised, almost in pain, "you got to be."

I got to be what, honeysuckle?" He tightened his arm around her slim shoulders. They were sitting in a booth with a few others, drinking Angel Wings. Her mouth, the lipstick darkly blurred now, tipped unevenly toward his.

"You got to be different," she breathed.

It was later still that she felt so fragile. Walking toward the Ladies' she was afraid to bump against anything because her skin felt hard and brittle, and she knew it was possible, in this condition, to fall apart at the slightest touch. She locked herself in the bathroom stall and remembered his hand, thumbing back the transparent skin and crackling blue peel. Her clothing itched. The pink shell was sweaty and hitched up too far under her arms but she couldn't take off her jacket, the white vinyl her son King had given her, because the pink top was ripped across the stomach. But as she sat there, something happened...

© 2001, HarperCollins Publishers.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 2 comments:

truckli, January 1, 2011 (view all comments by truckli)
This book restored my long-lost interest in fiction. It is hilarious, wildly compassionate, tinted with magic, and almost cinematic in its reality; many of its dialogues could have been lifted from real life. No book I've read before or since has so fully loved each of its characters, no matter their failings. I can't think of another book that's made me laugh so hard in a long time either. Erdrich is a true master.
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booksrock, March 7, 2007 (view all comments by booksrock)
This book is one of my all-time favorites. Louise Erdrich weaves an amazing story of life and love. With different perspectives from people on a reservation, we discover a story that wrenches and brightens our hearts
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Product Details

ISBN:
9780060975548
Subtitle:
New and Expanded Version
Author:
Erdrich, Louise
Publisher:
Harper Perennial
Location:
New York
Subject:
General
Subject:
Fiction
Subject:
Indians of north america
Subject:
North dakota
Subject:
Ojibwa Indians
Subject:
Ojibwa Indians -- Fiction.
Subject:
General Fiction
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade PB
Series Volume:
10
Publication Date:
19931117
Binding:
Paperback
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Yes
Pages:
384
Dimensions:
8.14x5.34x.93 in. .65 lbs.

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Related Subjects

Featured Titles » Miscellaneous Award Winners
Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z
History and Social Science » Native American » Literature
History and Social Science » Pacific Northwest » Literature Folklore and Memoirs

Love Medicine Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$3.95 In Stock
Product details 384 pages Perennial (HarperCollins) - English 9780060975548 Reviews:
"Review" by , "A powerful piece of work...Louise Erdrich is the rarest kind of writer; as compassionate as she is sharp-sighted."
"Review" by , "The beauty of Love Medicine is the work of a tough, loving mind."
"Review" by , "A dazzling series of family portraits....This novel is simply about the power of love."
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