The Good, the Bad, and the Hungry Sale
 
 

Recently Viewed clear list


Original Essays | June 20, 2014

Lisa Howorth: IMG So Many Books, So Many Writers



I'm not a bookseller, but I'm married to one, and Square Books is a family. And we all know about families and how hard it is to disassociate... Continue »

spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$5.50
Used Trade Paper
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
Qty Store Section
1 Local Warehouse Textbooks- General

Reporting for the Media

by

Reporting for the Media Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Now in its ninth edition, Reporting for the Media continues to be an essential resource for journalism students and instructors. A comprehensive introduction to newswriting and reporting, this classic text offers a straightforward guide to crafting effective journalism. Moreover, it grounds students firmly in the basics of reporting--how to become more curious about the world, generate provocative ideas, gather vital information and write incisive stories.

The authors provide students with the skills they need to produce engaging journalism by focusing on such central topics as grammar basics, newswriting style, traditional story structures and styles, interviewing techniques, reporting on speeches and meetings and common ethical dilemmas. The text also explores a variety of advanced topics including broadcast writing, law, ethics and public relations. In every chapter, students encounter vital tools for the creation of versatile journalism; these tools enable them to apply their knowledge to any type of journalism in any medium.

The ninth edition features a new introductory chapter, "Journalism Today," which discusses recent developments in the field, from technology and newsroom convergence to the proliferation of blogs. In addition, all chapters and examples have been updated throughout. The text's lively end-of-chapter exercises have also been updated and continue to encourage students to "learn by doing" through the practical application of skills. An updated list of Common Writing Errors is now featured on the inside back cover; along with a condensed version of the AP stylebook, this resource offers helpful grammar and style assistance to students as they interact with the material. As in previous editions, the book also integrates advice from professional journalists, discussion questions, suggested projects, four useful appendices and end-of-chapter checklists.

The leading text for newswriting and reporting courses, Reporting for the Media, Ninth Edition, offers outstanding and unparalleled training for dynamic journalists.

Synopsis:

Now in its eighth edition, Reporting for the Media continues its outstanding tradition in journalism education. Providing both students and instructors with a firm foundation on which to build journalistic success, it emphasizes the most important skills and characteristics of effective reporters--how to be engaged in and curious about the world and how to articulate a good story.

Reporting for the Media, 8/e, introduces students to news writing and reporting by focusing on such basics as grammar and mechanics, traditional story structures and styles, interviewing techniques, reporting on speeches and meetings, and common ethical dilemmas. Taking into consideration the increasingly multimedia nature of journalism, this new edition includes material on broadcast writing and convergence. It also covers prewriting, using the Internet, and computer-assisted reporting. The eighth edition features new exercises in nearly every chapter, expanded coverage of grammar--including parts of speech--and thoroughly updated real-life examples and illustrations, many covering issues that have arisen since 9/11. As in previous editions, this book features reading lists, discussion questions, suggested projects, five useful appendices, and end-of-chapter checklists. Reporting for the Media, 8/e, is an ideal text for introductory news writing and reporting courses.

About the Author

John R. Bender is Associate Professor of Journalism at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

Lucinda D. Davenport is Professor of Journalism at Michigan State University.

Michael W. Drager is Associate Professor of Journalism at Shippensburg University.

Fred Fedler is Professor of Journalism at the University of Central Florida.

Table of Contents

Preface


1. The Basics: Format, Copy Editing, and AP Style


Producing Copy


News Story Format


Copy-editing Symbols


The Associated Press Stylebook and Briefing on Media Law


Accuracy of Names and Facts


The Writing Coach--The Lucky 13 Ways to Become a Good Writer


Checklist for Copy Preparation


Suggested Readings


Useful Web Sites


Exercises


2. Grammar and Spelling


The Parts of Speech


Basic Sentence Structure


Active and Passive Voice


Agreement


Ambiguous Pronouns


Plurals and Possessives


"That" and "Which"


"Who" and "Whom"


Misplaced Modifiers


Dangling Modifiers


Personification


Parallel Form


"Because" and "Due To"


Spelling


Grammar and Checklist


The Writing Coach--Acronyms Lift Your Writing


Suggested Readings


Useful Web Sites


Exercises


3. Newswriting Style


Prewriting


Simplify Words, Sentences, and Paragraphs


Remain Objective


Checklist for Newswriting Style


The Writing Coach--Find the Clear Path to Writing Glory


Suggested Readings


Exercises


4. The Language of News


The Effectiveness of Words


Be Precise


Use Strong Verbs


Avoiding Problems in Your Writing


Words to Avoid


Other Problems to Avoid


Checklist for the Language of News


The Writing Coach--Become a Power Lifter When Picking Verbs


Suggested Readings


Exercises


5. Selecting and Reporting the News


The Characteristics of News


Two Views of 9/11


Types of News


Public/Civic Journalism


Applying the Principles of News Selection


The Concept of Objectivity


Details Newspapers Are Reluctant to Publish


The Importance of Accuracy


Suggested Readings


Exercises


6. Basic News Leads


The Summary News Lead


Sentence Structure in Leads


Guidelines for Writing Effective Leads


Avoiding Some Common Errors


Apply the Guidelines to other Kinds of Leads


Checklist for Writing Leads


The Writing Coach--Oh Where, Oh Where Does the Time Element Go?


Suggested Readings


Exercises


7. Alternative Leads


Criticisms


"Buried" or "Delayed" Leads


Multiparagraph Leads


Using Quotations


Using Questions


Suspenseful Leads


Descriptive Leads


Shockers-Leads With a Twist


Ironic Leads


Direct-Address Leads


Words Used in Unusual Ways


Other Unusual Leads


The Writing Coach--Too Many Words Can Muddle Writing


Exercises


8. The Body of a News Story


The Inverted-Pyramid Style


The Hourglass Style


The Focus Style


The Narrative Style


Using Transitions


Explain the Unfamiliar


The Importance of Examples


The Use of Description


The Use of Humor


The Need to Be Fair


The Final Step: Edit Your Story


Checklist for Writing News Stories


The Writing Coach--How to Find the Endings to Stories


Suggested Readings


Exercises


9. Quotations and Attribution


Quotations


Blending Quotations Narrative


Attribution


Guidelines for Capitalizing and Punctuating Quotations


Checklists for Quotations and Attribution


A Memo From the Editor--Descriptive Writing: Turning a Good Story Into a Great Story


Suggested Readings


Exercises


10. Interviews


Why Am I Interviewing?


Whom Should I Interview?


When Should I Conduct My Interviews?


Where Should I Conduct the Interview?


What Questions Should I Ask?


How Should I Conduct Interviews


Writing the Interview Story


The Writing Coach--Figure It: Poetry Can Be in Newspaper Stories


Suggested Readings


Useful Web Sites


Exercises


11. Writing Obituaries


Types of Death Reports


Jim Nicholson: No. 1 in Obituaries


Obituary Writing Considerations


Checklists for Reporting and Writing Obituaries


Suggested Readings


Useful Web Sites


Exercises


12. Speeches and Meetings


Advance Stories


Covering the Speech or Meeting


Follow Stories


Internet Brings Pornography to Children, Researcher Says


Remember Your Readers


Adding Color


Checklists for Reporting Speeches and Meetings


The Writing Coach--Go Beyond the Stick


Suggested Readings


Useful Web Sites


Exercises


13. Specialized Types of Stories


Brights


Follow-ups


Roundups


Sidebars


Checklists for Writing Specialized Stories


A Memo From the Editor--History, Traditions, and Culture: Old Glory and Noodle


Suggested Reading


Exercises


14. Feature Stories


Selecting a Topic and Gathering Information


Types of Feature Stories


Types of Feature Leads


The Body of Feature Story


The Ending of Feature Story


What does It Take to Be a Top-Notch Writer?


Suggested Readings


Useful Web Sites


Exercises


15. Public Affairs Reporting


Crime and Accidents


Covering the Search for a Serial Killer


Local Government


Courts


Checklists for Public Affairs Reporting


A Note About This Chapter's Exercises


The Writing Coach--The "Knows" Have It for Police and Court Reporters


Suggested Readings


Useful Web Sites


Exercises


16. Understanding and Using the Internet


A Brief History


Journalists and the Internet


E-Mail


Internet Addresses, Web Sites, or URLs (Universal Resource Locators)


Search Engines and Subject Directories


Mailing Lists and Newsgroups


Ethical Considerations


Suggested Readings


Useful Web Sites


Exercises


17. Advanced Reporting


Using Statistics


Conducting Informal Polls


Using Computers to Get Answers


Converging Media


Checklist for Using Statistics


Checklist for Conducting Informal Polls


A Memo From the Editor--Good Writing's Great, but It's Not Enough


Suggested Readings


Exercises


18. Writing for Broadcast


Writing for Your Listener


Writing for Your Announcer


Leads for Broadcast Services


The Body of a Broadcast News Story


Updating Broadcast News Stories


Guidelines for Copy Preparation


Editing Copy


Putting Together a Newscast


Sources for Broadcast News


The Newsroom Environment


Checklist for Broadcast News Writing


Suggested Readings


Useful Web Sites


Exercises


19. The News Media and PR Practitioners


What is Public Relations?


Becoming a Public Relations Practitioner


Working With News Media


Elements of a News Release


Types of News Releases


The Journalist's Perspective: Working with Press Releases


The No. 1 Problem: Lack of Newsworthiness


The No. 2 Problem: Lack of Objectivity


Other Problems with News Releases


Some Final Guidelines


Checklists for PR Practitioners


Checklist for Handling News Releases


Guest-Column-Transparency Is Paramount


Suggested Readings


Exercises


20. Communications Law


Libel


12 Steps for Avoiding Libel Suits


Privacy


Newsgathering


Bar-Press Guidelines


Checklists


Suggested Readings


Useful Web Sites


Exercises


21. Ethics


Media Credibility


Ethical Decision Making


Ethics Issues


Codes of Ethics


Checklist for improving Media Credibility


A Memo From the Editor--Some Thoughts on Plagiarism


Suggested Readings


Useful Web Sites


Exercises


22. Careers


A Journalist's Attributes


Be the Applicant Who Gets Hired


The Industry Needs More Women and Minorities


Freelance Writing


Checklist for Finding the Right Journalism Job


Suggested Readings


Useful Web Sites


Appendixes


A. City Directory


B. The Associated Press Stylebook


C. Rules for Forming Possessives


D. Answer Keys


E. Common Writing Errors


Credit Lines


Index


Product Details

ISBN:
9780195337433
Author:
Bender, John R
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Author:
null, Lucinda D.
Author:
Davenport, Lucinda
Author:
Davenport, Lucinda D.
Author:
null, John R.
Author:
Bender, John R.
Author:
Fedler, Fred
Author:
null, Fred
Author:
Michael W., Drager
Author:
null, Michael W.
Author:
Drager, Michael W.
Subject:
Journalism
Subject:
Reporters and reporting
Subject:
Communication
Subject:
Media Studies
Subject:
Communication | Journalism
Subject:
Journalism-Reference
Copyright:
Publication Date:
20080324
Binding:
Paperback
Grade Level:
College/higher education:
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Y
Pages:
688
Dimensions:
8.2 x 10.6 x 1.3 in 2.956 lb

Other books you might like

  1. The Scribner Anthology of...
    Used Trade Paper $9.50
  2. V for Vendetta
    Used Trade Paper $12.50
  3. The Vintage Book of Contemporary... Used Trade Paper $6.95
  4. Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?
    Used Trade Paper $8.00
  5. Angels in America: A Gay Fantasia on... Used Trade Paper $9.00

Related Subjects


History and Social Science » Journalism » General
History and Social Science » Sociology » Media
Textbooks » General

Reporting for the Media Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$5.50 In Stock
Product details 688 pages Oxford University Press, USA - English 9780195337433 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , Now in its eighth edition, Reporting for the Media continues its outstanding tradition in journalism education. Providing both students and instructors with a firm foundation on which to build journalistic success, it emphasizes the most important skills and characteristics of effective reporters--how to be engaged in and curious about the world and how to articulate a good story.

Reporting for the Media, 8/e, introduces students to news writing and reporting by focusing on such basics as grammar and mechanics, traditional story structures and styles, interviewing techniques, reporting on speeches and meetings, and common ethical dilemmas. Taking into consideration the increasingly multimedia nature of journalism, this new edition includes material on broadcast writing and convergence. It also covers prewriting, using the Internet, and computer-assisted reporting. The eighth edition features new exercises in nearly every chapter, expanded coverage of grammar--including parts of speech--and thoroughly updated real-life examples and illustrations, many covering issues that have arisen since 9/11. As in previous editions, this book features reading lists, discussion questions, suggested projects, five useful appendices, and end-of-chapter checklists. Reporting for the Media, 8/e, is an ideal text for introductory news writing and reporting courses.

spacer
spacer
  • back to top
Follow us on...




Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.