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The Curious Writer (Mycomplab)

The Curious Writer (Mycomplab) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

The Curious Writer  is an assignment-oriented reader-rhetoric that stresses the connections between personal and academic writing. Offering a unique, entertaining, and personal author voice, The Curious Writer is sure to grab the reader's interest and motivates them to write.  Also distinctive is The Curious Writer’s emphasis on inquiry as both a driving force behind the writing process and a method of discovery and learning. The book operates on the principle that writers who begin with questions, rather than answers, achieve better results in their work. It treats research, revision, and critical reading skills (of both texts and visuals) as organic components of every writing process. Each of the eight writing assignment chapters offers integrated coverage of these three key activities and also provides special attention to the Web as a resource for invention and research.

Synopsis:

Want to save time and improve results?

MyCompLab is a dynamic, interactive online resource that gives you everything you need to become a better writer & researcher–all in one easy-to-use Web site. Log onto www.mycomplab.com and find a wealth of activities, practice tests, model documents, tutorials, and much more!

Find answers to your concerns…

How do I know if I’m plagiarizing or not?

Research papers overwhelm me. Where do I start?

I’d like to see sample papers--so I know what I’m supposed to be doing.

Grammar is really difficult for me.

If this text did not come with a MyCompLab access code, visit www.mycomplab.com to purchase a subscription.

Synopsis:

The Curious Writer by Bruce Ballenger is an assignment-oriented, all-in-one rhetoric-reader-handbook that stresses the connections between personal and academic writing.

Table of Contents

Instructor Preface

Student Preface  

 

PART ONE - THE SPIRIT OF INQUIRY

Chapter 1: Writing as Inquiry

Motives for Writing

Beliefs About Writing

Exercise 1.1: What Do You Believe?

One Student’s Response: Jon’s Journal

Inquiring into the Details: Journals

Unlearning Unhelpful Beliefs

The Beliefs of This Book

 Inquiring into the Details: Portfolios

Writing Situations and Rhetorical Choices

Habits of Mind

Start with Questions, Not Answers

Suspend Judgment

Search for Surprise 

 Exercise 1.2 A Roomful of Details

 One Student’s Response: Margaret’s Journal

 Inquiring into the Details: Invention Strategies

Writing as a Process

Recognizing the Challenges

 Exercise 1.3 What Is Your Process?

Thinking About Your Process

Linear versus Recursive Models

Dialectical Thinking

 Exercise 1.4 Practicing Dialectical Thinking

 One Student’s Response: Jon’s Journal  

 Writing with Computers

 Exercise 1.5 Overcome Your Own Challenges

Using What You Have Learned

Chapter 2: Reading as Inquiry  

Motives for Reading  

Beliefs About Reading  

 Exercise 2.1 What Do You Believe?  

Reading Situations and Rhetorical Choices  

Reading as a Process  

Linear versus Recursive Models  

 Exercise 2.2 Reading Strategies  

Reading: Henry David Thoreau, Excerpt from Walden  

 Inquiring into the Details: Reading Perspectives  

Dialectical Thinking  

Writing with Computers  

Believing and Doubting  

 Exercise 2.3 Practicing Dialectical Thinking  

 Reading: Bruce Ballenger, “The Importance of Writing Badly”  

 One Student’s Response: Todd’s Journal  

 Inquiring into the Details: The Double-Entry Journal  

Adapting to Unfamiliar Reading Situations  

 Exercise 2.4 Further Practice: Untangling Academic Prose  

 Reading: David W. Noble, excerpt from The Forces of Production: A Social History of Industrial Automation  

 Inquiring into the Details: Encountering Unfamiliar Genres  

“Reading” The Visual  

Learning the Grammar of Images

Some Strategies for Reading Images

 Exercise 2.5 Reading Images  

The “Look” of Writing

Using What You Have Learned

Chapter 3: Ways of Inquiring

Opening Questions for Inquiry 

Exploration  

Explanation  

Evaluation  

Reflection  

Practicing Inquiry

Reading: Bruce Ballenger,  “How Much Should We Care What Happens to Animals”  

 Exercise 3.1 Exploring Within and Without  

Reading: Frank Bruni, excerpt from “It Died for Us”  

 One Student’s Response: Daniel’s Journal  

 Exercise 3.2 Explaining to Yourself, Explaining to Others  

 One Student’s Response: Daniel’s Journal  

 Exercise 3.3 Evaluating the Arguments

 One Student’s Response: Daniel’s Journal

 Exercise 3.4 Reflecting on the Process  

 One Student’s Response: Daniel’s Journal  

Symphonic Inquiry  

Inquiring into the Details: Time to Write

Using What You Have Learned  

PART TWO — INQUIRY PROJECTS

 

Chapter 4: Writing a Personal Essay  

Writing About Experience  

Motives for Writing a Personal Essay  

Personal Essays and Academic Writing  

Features of the Form 

Personal Essay: Anne-Marie Oomen, “The Barn” 

Inquiring into the Essay  

 Personal Essay: Naomi Shibab Nye, “Long Overdue” 

Inquiring into the Essay 

 Personal Essay: Judith Ortiz Cofer, “One More Lesson” 

Inquiring into the Essay  

Seeing the Form: Self Portrait by Frances Benjamin Johnston 

The Writing Process  

Thinking About Subjects  

Generating Ideas  

 One Student’s Response: Margaret’s Journal  

 Inquiring into the Details: Clustering or Mapping  

Judging What You Have  

Writing the Sketch  

Writing with Computers

Student Sketch: Lana Kuchta, “The Way I Remember” 

Moving from Sketch to Draft  

Research and Other Strategies: Gathering More Information  

Composing the Draft  

Workshopping the Draft   

Writing with Computers

Revising the Draft  

Polishing the Draft  

Student Essay: Julia C. Arredondo, “Beet Field Dreams”  

Evaluating the Essay 

Using What You Have Learned 

Chapter 5: Writing a Profile

Writing About People

Motives for Writing a Profile 

The Profile and Academic Writing 

Features of the Form 

Profile: Sonja Livingston, “Thumb-Sucking Girl”  

Inquiring into the Essay 

Profile: Anonymous, “Soup”  

Inquiring into the Essay 

Profile: Lauren Slater, “Dr. Daedalus” 

Inquiring into the Essay 

Profile: Gib Akin, “Joe Cool” 

Inquiring into the Essay  

 Seeing the Form: Roy Takeno Reading Paper in Front of Office by Ansel Adams  

The Writing Process  

Thinking About Subjects  

Generating Ideas  

One Student’s Response: Jennifer’s Journal  

One Student’s Response: Bruce’s Journal  

Judging What You Have  

Interviewing  

Inquiring into the Details: Tape Recorders  

Selected Interview Notes: Margaret Parker, “Medical Student” 

Writing the Sketch  

Moving from Sketch to Draft  

Research and Other Strategies: Gathering More Information  

Composing the Draft  

Writing with Computers  

Workshopping the Draft  

Reflecting on the Draft  

Revising the Draft  

Polishing the Draft  

Student Essay: Margaret Parker, “Medical Student”  

Evaluating the Essay  

Using What You Have Learned  

Chapter 6: Writing a Review  

Writing That Evaluates  

Motives for Writing a Review  

The Review and Academic Writing  

Features of the Form  

Review: Anthony Lane, “Space Case”  

Inquiring into the Essay  

Review: Lester Bangs, “Review of Peter Guralnick’s Lost Highways”  

Inquiring into the Essay  

Review: Ann Hodgman, “No Wonder They Call Me a Bitch”  

Inquiring into the Essay  

 Seeing the Form: Choosing the Best Picture

The Writing Process  

Thinking About Subjects  

Generating Ideas  

Writing with Computers  

Judging What You Have  

 Exercise 6.1 From Jury to Judgment    One Student’s Response: Christy’s Journal  

Inquiring into the Details: Collaborating on Criteria  

Writing the Sketch  

Student Sketch: Christy Claymore, “Casablanca: Even As Time Goes By”  

Moving from Sketch to Draft  

Research and Other Strategies: Gathering More Information  

Composing the Draft  

Workshopping the Draft  

 One Student’s Response: Christy’s Journal  

Revising the Draft  

Polishing the Draft  

Student Essay: Christy Claymore, “Casablanca Endures: Even As Time Goes By”

Evaluating the Essay  

Using What You Have Learned  

Chapter 7: Writing a Proposal  

Writing About Problems and Solutions  

Problems of Consequence  

Problems of Scale  

Motives for Writing Proposals  

The Proposal and Academic Writing  

Features of the Form  

Proposal: Barrett Seaman, “How Binging Became the New College Sport”  

Inquiring into the Essay  

Proposal: Michael Arad and Peter Walker, “Reflecting Absence”  

Inquiring into the Essay  

Proposal: Julie Ann Homutoff, “A Research Proposal: Effect of Infant’s Perceived Gender?”  

Inquiring into the Essay 

 Seeing the Form: The Faces of Meth Use 

The Writing Process  

Thinking About Subjects  

Generating Ideas  

 One Student’s Response: Caesar’s Journal  

 One Student’s Response: Gina’s Journal  

Inquiring into the Details: Causation  

Judging What You Have  

Inquiring into the Details: Writing a Research Proposal

Writing the Sketch  

Student Sketch: Gina Sinisi, “Clothing Optional”  

Moving from Sketch to Draft  

 One Student’s Response: Gina’s Journal   

Writing with Computers  

Research and Other Strategies: Gathering More Information  

Composing the Draft  

Inquiring into the Details: Evidence–A Case Study  

Workshopping the Draft  

Revising the Draft  

Polishing the Draft  

Student Essay: Gina Sinisi, “Clothing Optional”  

Evaluating the Essay  

Using What You Have Learned  

Chapter 8: Writing an Argument  

Writing to Persuade People  

Getting into Arguments

Arguments and Inquiry

Making Claims

Two Sides to Every Argument?  

Motives for Writing an Argument  

The Argument and Academic Writing  

Features of the Form  

Argument: Alice Goodman, “Getting Real in the Classroom”  

Inquiring into the Essay  

 Inquiring into the Details: Some Basic Argument Strategies  

Argument: George F. Will, “The ‘Growth Model’ and the Growth of Illiteracy”  

Inquiring into the Essay  

Argument: Erin Aubry Kaplan, “Still Trying to Kick the Kink”  

Inquiring into the Essay  

 Seeing the Form: The “Imagetext” As Argument   

The Writing Process  

Thinking About Subjects  

Generating Ideas  

One Student’s Response: Ben’s Journal  

Writing with Computers  

Judging What You Have Got  

Writing the Sketch  

Student Sketch: Ben Bloom, “How to Really Rock the Vote”  

Moving from Sketch to Draft  

Inquiring into the Details: Ethos, Pathos, and Logos and the Rhetorical Situation   

Inquiring into the Details: Using Toulmin to Analyze Arguments   

Research and Other Strategies: Gathering More Information  

Composing the Draft  

Inquiring into the Details: What Evidence Can Do  

Workshopping the Draft  

Inquiring into the Details: Ten Common Logical Fallacies  

Revising the Draft  

Polishing the Draft  

Student Essay: Kelly Sundberg, “I Am Not a Savage”  

Evaluating the Essay  

Using What You Have Learned  

Chapter 9: Writing a Critical Essay  

Writing About Literature  

Motives for Writing a Critical Essay  

The Critical Essay and Academic Writing  

Features of the Form  

Short Story: Leslie Marmon Silko, “Lullaby”  

Inquiring into the Story  

One Student’s Response: Noel’s Journal  

Short Story: Joyce Carol Oates, “Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been?”  

Inquiring into the Story  

Critical Essay: Alice Hall Petry, “Who Is Ellie? Oates’ ‘Where Are Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been?’”  

Inquiring into the Essay  

Essay: Michael Dorris, “Three Yards”  

Inquiring into the Details: How to Read Nonfiction  

Inquiring into the Essay  

 Seeing the Form: Christina’s World by Andrew Wyeth  

The Writing Process  

Thinking About Subjects  

Generating Ideas  

Inquiring into the Details: Common Literary Devices  

Judging What You Have   

 Inquiring into the Details: What Is A “Strong Reading”? 

Writing a Sketch  

Student Sketch: Julie Bird, “What Is the Role of Nature in ‘Lullaby’?”  

Moving from Sketch to Draft  

Research and Other Strategies: Gathering More Information  

Writing with Computers 

Composing the Draft  

Workshopping the Draft  

Revising the Draft  

Polishing the Draft  

Student Essay: Julie Bird, “Nature as Being: Landscape in Silko’s ‘Lullaby’”

Evaluating the Essay  

Using What You Have Learned  

Chapter 10: Writing an Ethnographic Essay

Writing About Culture  

Motives for Writing Ethnography  

Ethnography and Academic Writing  

Features of the Form  

Ethnographic Essay:  Rachel Simmons, “Intimate Enemies”  

Inquiring into the Essay  

Ethnographic Essay:  Patricia Leigh Brown, “For the Muslim Prom Queen, There Are No Kings Allowed”  

Inquiring into the Essay  

Ethnographic Essay:  Rebakah Nathan, “My Freshman Year: Worldliness and Worldview”

Inquiring into the Essay

Seeing the Form: Mrs. Smith’s Kitchen Table and Vanity the Day After She Died  

The Writing Process  

Thinking About Subjects  

Writing with Computers  

Generating Ideas  

Writing with Computers  

Judging What You Have  

Inquiring into the Details: Questions Ethnographers Ask  

Inquiring into the Details: Ethnography and Ethics

Field Notes: Rita Guerra, “Field Notes on Friday Afternoon at Emerald Lanes”  

Writing the Sketch  

Moving from Sketch to Draft  

Research and Other Strategies: Gathering More Information  

 Inquiring into the Details: Useful Library Databases for Ethnography  

Composing the Draft  

Workshopping the Draft  

Revising the Draft  

Polishing the Draft  

Student Essay: Kersti Harter, “Beyond ‘Gaydar’: How Gay Males Identify Other Gay Males”  

Evaluating the Essay  

Using What You Have Learned  

PART THREE — INQUIRING DEEPER

 

Chapter 11: Writing a Research Essay  

Writing with Research  

Research Essays Versus Research Papers

Motives for Writing a Research Essay  

The Research Essay and Academic Writing  

Features of the Form  

Undocumented Research Essay:  Christian Century Magazine, “Courting Confusion”  

Inquiring into the Essay  

Documented Research Essay:  Beth Bailey, “The Worth of a Date”  

Inquiring into the Essay  

Documented Research Paper:  Tracey Lambert, “Pluralistic Ignorance and Hooking Up”  

Inquiring into the Details: Reading Academic Research Essays  

Inquiring into the Essay  

Seeing the Form: Idaho State Penitentiary, Women’s Prison  

The Writing Process  

Thinking About Subjects  

Generating Ideas  

 One Student’s Response: Julian’s Journal  

Judging What You Have  

 Inquiring into the Details: Finding the Focusing Question  

 One Student’s Response: Julian’s Journal  

Writing the Sketch  

Student Sketch: Amy Garrett, “Why Do People Tan?”  

Moving from Sketch to Draft  

Research and Other Strategies: Gathering More Information  

Composing the Draft  

Workshopping the Draft  

Writing with Computers

Revising the Draft  

Polishing the Draft  

Student Essay: Gordon E. Seirup, “College Dating”  

Evaluating the Essay  

Using What You Have Learned  

Chapter 12: Research Techniques  

Methods of Collecting  

Research in the Electronic Age  

Magic Words That Open Doors  

How Librarians Organize Books  

Library of Congress Subject Headings  

Google Your Boole  

Writing with Computers

Developing Working Knowledge  

Searching Key Library References  

 Inquiring into the Details: Methods of Recording Information  

Conducting Subject Surveys on the Web  

 Inquiring into the Details: The Working Bibliography  

Evaluating Library Sources  

Evaluating Web Sources  

Developing Focused Knowledge  

Finding Books  

 Inquiring into the Details: How to Annotate a Book  

Finding Periodicals  

Finding Newspapers  

Finding Sources on the Web  

Writing in the Middle: Synthesizing Source Information and Your Own Ideas  

Writing with Computers

One Student’s Response: Claude’s Research Log  

Interviews  

Arranging Interviews  

Making Contact  

Conducting the Interview  

Using the Interview in Your Writing  

Surveys  

Defining a Survey’s Goals and Audience  

Types of Survey Questions  

 Inquiring into the Details: Types of Survey Questions

Crafting Survey Questions  

Conducting a Survey  

Using Survey Results in Your Writing  

Knowing When to Stop  

Using What You Have Learned  

Chapter 13: Using and Citing Sources  

Controlling Information  

Using Sources  

Summarizing  

Paraphrasing  

Quoting  

Citing Sources  

Writing with Computers  

Avoiding Plagiarism  

 Exercise 13.1 The Accidental Plagiarist  

MLA Documentation Guidelines  

 Inquiring into the Details: The Common Knowledge Exception  

Citing Sources  

 Inquiring into the Details: Citations That Go with the Flow   

Writing with Computers

Format  

Preparing the “Works Cited” Page  

A Sample Paper in the MLA Style  

APA Documentation Guidelines  

 Inquiring into the Details: Recent APA Style Changes  

How the Essay Should Look  

Citing Sources in Your Essay  

Preparing the “References” List  

A Sample Paper in the APA Style  

Using What You Have Learned  

PART FOUR - REINQUIRING

Chapter 14: Revision Strategies  

Reseeing Your Topic  

Divorcing the Draft  

Writing with Computers  

Strategies for Divorcing the Draft  

Photography as a Metaphor for Revision  

Rhetorical Revision  

Five Categories of Revision  

Problems of Purpose  

Revision Strategy 14.1: What’s Your Primary Motive?  

Revision Strategy 14.2: What Do You Want to Know About What You Learned?  

 One Student’s Response: Julia’s Draft  

Revision Strategy 14.3: Finding the Focusing Question  

Revision Strategy 14.4: What’s the Relationship?  

Problems with Meaning  

Implicit or Explicit Meaning  

Looking Beyond the Obvious  

Methods for Discovering Your Thesis  

Revision Strategy 14.5: Find the “Instructive Line”  

Revision Strategy 14.6: Looping Toward a Thesis  

Revision Strategy 14.7: Reclaiming Your Topic  

Revision Strategy 14.8: Believing and Doubting  

Methods for Refining Your Thesis  

Revision Strategy 14.9: Questions as Knives  

Revision Strategy 14.10: Qualifying Your Claims

Problems with Information  

Revision Strategy 14.11: Explode a Moment  

Revision Strategy 14.12: Beyond Examples  

Revision Strategy 14.13: Research 

Revision Strategy 14.14: Backing up Your Assumptions

Problems with Structure  

Formal Academic Structures  

Revision Strategy 14.15: Reorganizing Around Thesis and Support  

Revision Strategy 14.16: Multiple Leads  

 Inquiring into the Details: Types of Leads  

Revision Strategy 14.17: The Frankenstein Draft  

Revision Strategy 14.18: Make a PowerPoint Outline  

Problems of Clarity and Style  

Solving Problems of Clarity 

Revision Strategy 14.19: Untangling Paragraphs  

Inquiring into the Details: Transition Flags  

Revision Strategy 14.20: Cutting Clutter  

Revision Strategy 14.21: The Actor and the Action Next Door  

Improving Style  

Revision Strategy 14.22: Actors and Actions  

Revision Strategy 14.23: Smoothing the Choppiness  

Revision Strategy 14.24: Fresh Ways to Say Things  

Using What You Have Learned  

Chapter 15: The Writer’s Workshop  

Making the Most of Peer Review  

Being Read  

Divorcing the Draft  

Instructive Talk  

Models for Writing Workshops  

Full-Class Workshops  

Small-Group Workshops  

One-on-One Peer Review  

The Writer’s Responsibilities  

Writing with Computers  

The Reader’s Responsibilities  

Inquiring into the Details: Finding a Role    

What Can Go Wrong and What to Do About It  

Exercise 15.1 Group Problem Solving  

 One Student’s Response: Amy’s Perspective on Workshops  

Methods of Responding  

Experiential and Directive Responses  

Response Formats  

Reflecting on the Workshop  

Using What You Have Learned  

Appendix A: The Writing Portfolio

Appendix B: The Literature Review

Appendix C: The Annotated Bibliography 

Appendix D: The Essay Exam

Product Details

ISBN:
9780205532131
Publisher:
Longman
Subject:
Writing Skills
Author:
Ballenger, Bruce
Subject:
Composition & Creative Writing - Academic
Subject:
Composition & Creative Writing - General
Subject:
Composition & Creative Writing
Copyright:
Edition Number:
2
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Series:
Ballenger Series MyCompLab Series
Publication Date:
January 2007
Binding:
Paperback
Grade Level:
College/higher education:
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Y
Pages:
768
Dimensions:
9.07x7.52x1.08 in. 2.49 lbs.

Related Subjects

Reference » Writing » General

The Curious Writer (Mycomplab)
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$ In Stock
Product details 768 pages Longman Publishing Group - English 9780205532131 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , Want to save time and improve results?

MyCompLab is a dynamic, interactive online resource that gives you everything you need to become a better writer & researcher–all in one easy-to-use Web site. Log onto www.mycomplab.com and find a wealth of activities, practice tests, model documents, tutorials, and much more!

Find answers to your concerns…

How do I know if I’m plagiarizing or not?

Research papers overwhelm me. Where do I start?

I’d like to see sample papers--so I know what I’m supposed to be doing.

Grammar is really difficult for me.

If this text did not come with a MyCompLab access code, visit www.mycomplab.com to purchase a subscription.

"Synopsis" by , The Curious Writer by Bruce Ballenger is an assignment-oriented, all-in-one rhetoric-reader-handbook that stresses the connections between personal and academic writing.
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