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The Hours

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The Hours Cover

 

 

Reading Group Guide

1. Clarissa Vaughan is described several times as an “ordinary” woman. Do you accept this valuation? If so, what does it imply about the ordinary, about being ordinary? What makes someone, by contrast, extraordinary?

2. Flowers and floral imagery play a significant part in The Hours. When and where are flowers described? What significance do they have, and with what events and moods are they associated? How do flowers affect Virginia? Clarissa?

3. Cunningham plays with the notions of sanity and insanity, recognizing that there might be only a very fine line between the two states. What does the novel imply about the nature of insanity? Might it in fact be a heightened sanity, or at least a heightened sense of awareness? Would you classify Richard as insane? How does his mental state compare with that of Virginia? Of Laura as a young wife? Of Septimus Smith in Mrs. Dalloway? Does insanity (or the received idea of insanity) appear to be connected with creative gifts?

4. Virginia and Laura are both, in a sense, prisoners of their eras and societies, and both long for freedom from this imprisonment. Clarissa Vaughan, on the other hand, apparently enjoys every liberty: freedom to be a lesbian, to come and go and live as she likes. Yet she has ended up, in spite of her unusual way of life, as a fairly conventional wife and mother. What might this fact indicate about the nature of society and the restrictions it imposes? Does the author imply that character, to a certain extent, is destiny?

5. Each of the novels three principal women, even the relatively prosaic and down-to-earth Clarissa, occasionally feels a sense of detachment, of playing a role. Laura feels as if she is “about to go onstage and perform in a play for which she is not appropriately dressed, and for which she has not adequately rehearsed” [p. 43]. Clarissa is filled with "a sense of dislocation. This is not her kitchen at all. This is the kitchen of an acquaintance, pretty enough but not her taste, full of foreign smells" [p. 91]. Is this feeling in fact a universal one? Is role-playing an essential part of living in the world, and of behaving “sanely”? Which of the characters refuses to act a role, and what price does he/she pay for this refusal?

6. Who kisses whom in The Hours, and what is the significance of each kiss?

7. The Hours is very much concerned with creativity and the nature of the creative act, and each of its protagonists is absorbed in a particular act of creation. For Virginia and Richard, the object is their writing; for Clarissa Vaughan (and Clarissa Dalloway), it is a party; for Laura Brown, it is another party, or, more generally, "This kitchen, this birthday cake, this conversation. This revived world" [p. 106]. What does the novel tell us about the creative process? How does each character revise and improve his or her creation during the course of the story?

8. How might Richards childhood experiences have made him the adult he eventually becomes? In what ways has he been wounded, disturbed?

9. Each of the three principal women is acutely conscious of her inner self or soul, slightly separate from the “self” seen by the world. Clarissas “determined, abiding fascination is what she thinks of as her soul” [p. 12]; Virginia “can feel it inside her, an all but indescribable second self, or rather a parallel, purer self. If she were religious, she would call it the soul . . . It is an inner faculty that recognizes the animating mysteries of the world because it is made of the same substance” [pp. 34-35]. Which characters keep these inner selves ruthlessly separate from their outer ones? Why?

10. Each of the novels characters sees himself or herself, most of the time, as a failure. Virginia Woolf, as she walks to her death, reflects that "She herself has failed. She is not a writer at all, really; she is merely a gifted eccentric" [p. 4]. Richard, disgustedly, admits to Clarissa, “I thought I was a genius. I actually used that word, privately, to myself” [p. 65]. Are the novels characters unusual, or are such feelings of failure an essential and inevitable part of the human condition?

11. Toward the end of Clarissas day, she realizes that kissing Richard beside the pond in Wellfleet was the high point, the culmination, of her life. Richard, apparently, feels the same. Are we meant to think, though, that their lives would have been better, more heightened, had they stayed together? Or does Cunningham imply that as we age we inevitably feel regret for some lost chance, and that what we in fact regret is youth itself?

12. The Hours could on one level be said to be a novel about middle age, the final relinquishment of youth and the youthful self. What does middle age mean to these characters? In what essential ways do these middle-aged people--Clarissa, Richard, Louis, Virginia --differ from their youthful selves? Which of them resists the change most strenuously?

13. What does the possibility of death represent to the various characters? Which of them loves the idea of death, as others love life? What makes some of the characters decide to die, others to live? What personality traits separate the “survivors” from the suicides?

14. If you have read Virginia Woolfs Mrs. Dalloway, would you describe The Hours as a modern version of it? A commentary upon it? A dialogue with it? Which characters in The Hours correspond with those of Woolfs novel? In what ways are they similar, and at what point do the similarities cease and the characters become freestanding individuals in their own right?

15. For the most part, the characters in The Hours have either a different gender or a different sexual orientation from their prototypes in Mrs. Dalloway. How much has all this gender-bending affected or changed the situations, the relationships, and the people?

16. Why has Cunningham chosen The Hours for the title of his novel (aside from the fact that it was Woolfs working title for Mrs. Dalloway)? In what ways is the title appropriate, descriptive? What do hours mean to Richard? To Laura? To Clarissa?

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 4 comments:

Shoshana, May 2, 2010 (view all comments by Shoshana)
Well-constructed and well-crafted, this is a highly engaging and poignant novel in three interwoven strands. These three stories of depression and suicidality are related by Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway--the writing of it, the reading of it, and the becoming of it--across the 20th century. This description doesn't do justice the the elegance and precision of the telling. Especially enjoyable for those familiar with Woolf's works and life.
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Rachel Coker, January 3, 2010 (view all comments by Rachel Coker)
One of the best books of the decade! Beautifully written, complex characters. Made me rethink my idea of happiness. It's possible that some seemingly ordinary day will, in fact, be one of the best times of your life.
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theflowers, January 15, 2008 (view all comments by theflowers)
Wow, is all I can say. It is an extremely well-crafted novel. (If at all interested in the motives of the writer, and a bit of insight into Cunningham's writing process, I recommend the interview Powell's conducted; the link is on the top of this page.)

Anyways - I picked up this book shortly after reading Mrs Dalloway, my first encounter with Virginia Woolf which completely blew me away. I was a bit timid, and afraid to pick up the legendary Woolf. Once I begun, though, I zipped through Mrs Dalloway, reluctant to ever put it down. Again, I digress, The Hours manages to intertwine thought and theme about Mrs Dalloway and Woolf's life using three stories of characters. We are introduced and brought into their lives, feeling their triflings and larger pains, and believe you me, you will be immersed fully in the lives of these characters. (I'm a high school student, and I finished the last chapter in my school's library, concurrently blocking out the chattering of my contemporaries. So enthralled in the storyline, was I, that by the time I closed the covers, I was in tears, smack in the middle of the library. It was great; really.)

Again, back to business, I do tend to leap into the asides - this book is a great read for anybody looking for a well-crafted, marvelously executed storyline; no knowledge of Virginia Woolf or Mrs Dalloway required!
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Product Details

ISBN:
9780312243029
Author:
Cunningham, Michael
Publisher:
Picador USA
Location:
New York :
Subject:
General
Subject:
Literary
Subject:
Fiction
Subject:
Women
Subject:
Man-woman relationships
Subject:
New york (n.y.)
Subject:
Psychological fiction
Subject:
Domestic fiction
Subject:
Literature-A to Z
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade Paper
Publication Date:
20000131
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Y
Pages:
240
Dimensions:
8.25 x 5.5 x 0.63 in

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Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z
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The Hours Used Trade Paper
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$6.95 In Stock
Product details 240 pages Picador USA - English 9780312243029 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , The author of "At Home at the End of the World" and "Flesh and Blood" draws inventively on the life and work of Virginia Woolf to tell the story of a group of contemporary characters struggling with conflicting claims of love and inheritance, hope and despair.
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