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The Island of the Colorblind

by

The Island of the Colorblind Cover

 

 

Excerpt

Islands have always fascinated me; perhaps they fascinate everyone. The first summer holiday I remember — I was just three years old — was a visit to the Isle of Wight. There are only fragments in memory — the cliffs of many-colored sands, the wonder of the sea, which I was seeing for the first time: it's calmness, its gentle swell, its warmth, entranced me; its roughness, when the wind rose, terrified me. My father told me that he had won a race swimming round the Isle of Wight before I was born, and this made me think of him as a giant, a hero.

Stories of islands, and seas, and ships and mariners entered my consciousness very early — my mother would tell me about Captain Cook, about Magellan and Tasman and Dampier and Bougainville, and all the islands and peoples they had discovered, and she would point them out to me on the globe. Islands were special places, remote and mysterious, intensely attractive, yet frightening too. I remember being terrified by a children's encyclopedia with a picture of the great blind statues of Easter Island looking out to sea, as I read that the Islanders had lost the power to sail away from the island and were totally cut off from the rest on humanity, doomed to die in utter isolation.

I read about castaways, desert islands, prison islands, leper islands. I adored The Lost World, Conan Doyle's splendid yarn about an isolated South American plateau full of dinosaurs and Jurassic lifeforms — in effect, an island marooned in time (I knew the book virtually by heart, and dreamed of growing up to be another Professor Challenger.)

I was very impressionable and readily made other people's imaginings my own. H.G. Wells was particularly potent--all desert islands, for me, became his Aepyornis Island or, in a nightmare mode, the island of Dr. Moreau. Later, when I came to read Herman Melville and Robert Louis Stevenson, the real and the imaginary fused in my mind. Did the Marquesas actually exist? Were Omoo and Typee actual adventures? I felt this uncertainty most especially about the Galapagos, for long before I read Darwin, I knew of them as the "evilly enchanted" isles of Melville's Encantadas.

Later still, factual and scientific accounts began to dominate my reading — Darwin's Voyage of the Beagle, Wallace's Malay Archipelago, and my favorite, Humboldt's Personal Narrative (I loved especially his description of the six thousand year old dragon tree on Tenerife) — and now the sense of the romantic, the mythical, the mysterious, became subordinated to the passion of scientific curiosity. For islands were, so to speak, experiments of nature, places blessed or cursed by geographic singularity to harbor unique forms of life — the aye-ayes and pottos, the lorises and lemurs of Madagascar; the great tortoises of the Galapagos; the giant flightless birds of New Zealand — all singular species or genera which had taken a separate evolutionary path in their isolated habitats. And I was strangely pleased by a phrase in one of Darwin's diaries, written after he had seen a kangaroo in Australia and found this so extraordinary and alien that he wondered if it did not represent a second creation.

As a child I had visual migraines, where I would have not only the classical scintillations and alterations of the visual fields, but alterations in the sense of color too, which might weaken or entirely disappear for a few minutes. This experience frightened me, but tantalized me too, and made me wonder what it would be like to live in a completely colorless world, not just for a few minutes, but permanently. It was not until many years later that I got an answer, at least a partial answer in the form of a patient, Jonathan I., a painter who had suddenly become totally colorblind following a car accident (and perhaps a stroke). He had lost color vision not through any damage to his eyes, it seemed, but through damage to parts of the brain which "construct" the sensation of color. Indeed, he seemed to have lost the ability not only to see color, but to imagine or remember it, even to dream of it. Nevertheless, like an amnesiac, he in some way remained conscious of having lost color, after a lifetime of chromatic vision, and complained of his world feeling impoverished, grotesque, abnormal--his art, his food, even his wife looked "leaden" to him. Still, he could not assuage my curiosity on the allied, yet totally different, matter of what it might be like never to have seen color, never to have had the least sense of its primal quality, its place in the world.

Ordinary colorblindness, arising from a defect in the retinal cells, is almost always partial, and some forms are very common: red-green colorblindness occurs to some degree in one in twenty men (it is much rarer in women). But total congenital colorblindness, or achromatopsia, is surpassingly rare, affecting perhaps one person in thirty or forty thousand. What, I wondered, would the visual world be like for those born totally colorblind? Would they, perhaps, lacking any sense of something missing, have a world no less dense and vibrant than our own? Might they even have developed heightened perceptions of visual tone and texture and movement and depth, and live in a world in some ways more intense than our own, a world of heightened reality--one that we can only glimpse echoes of in the work of the great black-and-white photographers? Might they indeed see us as peculiar, distracted by trivial or irrelevant aspects of the visual world, and insufficiently sensitive to its real visual essence? I could only guess, as I had never met anyone born completely colorblind.

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Lucy Little, August 31, 2007 (view all comments by Lucy Little)
Oliver Sacks writes another great "medical mystery." He travels through tiny islands in the South Pacific following disorders unique to their inhabitants. This book encompass travel, cultures, medicine and botany all in one. Fascinating.
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deanna, March 20, 2007 (view all comments by deanna)
A medical mystery combined with a travelogue written only as Oliver Sacks can put into words. I couldn't put this book down--the descriptions are so specific, yet interesting.
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Product Details

ISBN:
9780375700736
Author:
Sacks, Oliver
Publisher:
Vintage Books
Author:
Sacks, Oliver W.
Location:
New York
Subject:
General
Subject:
Essays
Subject:
Neurology
Subject:
Oceania
Subject:
Travel
Subject:
Diseases
Subject:
Human Physiology
Subject:
Physicians
Subject:
Ophthalmology
Subject:
Dementia
Subject:
Parkinsonism
Subject:
Medical anthropology
Subject:
Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis
Subject:
Color blindness
Subject:
Micronesia
Subject:
Parkinson's disease
Subject:
Cycads.
Subject:
Chamorro
Subject:
Pingelap
Subject:
Life Sciences - Human Anatomy & Physiology
Subject:
Color blindness -- Caroline Islands.
Subject:
Parkinsonism - Guam
Subject:
Neuropsychology
Subject:
Health and Medicine-Professional Medical Reference
Copyright:
Edition Number:
Vintage Books ed.
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Series:
Vintage
Series Volume:
AR-3
Publication Date:
19980131
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
20 ILLUSTRATIONS, 3 MAPS + 6,5
Pages:
336
Dimensions:
8 x 5.2 x 0.7 in 0.75 lb

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Related Subjects

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Health and Self-Help » Health and Medicine » Vision
Health and Self-Help » Psychology » General

The Island of the Colorblind Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$8.95 In Stock
Product details 336 pages Vintage Books USA - English 9780375700736 Reviews:
"Review" by , "Magical... Sacks's fans are in for a treat."
"Review" by , "Sacks's total immersion in islands life makes this luminous, beautifully written report a wonderous voyage of discovery. As a travel writer, Sacks ranks with Paul Theroux and Bruce Chatwin. As an investigator of the mind's mysteries, he is in a class by himself."
"Review" by , "Dr. Sacks's humane inquisitiveness lends a philosophical perspective to every threatening change. His scenes are stills from the moving picture of timeless evolution. And the way his subjects accept their fate redeems his story from gloom, even lending it a certain gaiety."
"Review" by , "Sacks's fans are in for a treat: This is a magical medical mystery tour of South Sea islands that goes beyond the neurological lore to reveal the good doctor as historian, botanist, environmentalist, anthropologist, and, as always, caring human being."
"Review" by , "A grand entertainment, a trove of learning. It is [Sacks's] combination of the artist's eye and the healer's touch that makes [his] work — and the man himself — so memorable. Unfailingly tolerant, open and curious, he humanizes everything he touches.... This makes him for many — our prophet of understanding."
"Synopsis" by , "An explorer of that most wonderous of islands, the human brain," writes D.M. Thomas in the New York Times Book Review, "Oliver Sacks also loves the oceanic kind of islands." Both kinds figure movingly in this book — part travelogue, part autobiography, part medical mystery story — in which Sacks's journeys to a tiny Pacific atoll and the island of Guam become explorations of the time, and the complexities of being human.
"Synopsis" by , "An explorer of that most wondrous of islands, the human brain," writes D.M. Thomas in The New York Times Book Review, "Oliver Sacks also loves the oceanic kind of islands." Both kinds figure movingly in this book--part travelogue, part autobiography, part medical mystery story--in which Sacks's journeys to a tiny Pacific atoll and the island of Guam become explorations of the meaning of islands, the genesis of disease, the wonders of botany, the nature of deep geological time, and the complexities of being human.
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