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    Original Essays | November 7, 2014

    Carli Davidson: IMG Puppies for Sale? Read This First



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4 Hawthorne Literature- A to Z

Snow

by

Snow Cover

ISBN13: 9780375706868
ISBN10: 0375706860
Condition: Standard
All Product Details

 

 

Reading Group Guide

1. Almost immediately after the novel opens, the narrator speaks in first person directly to the reader and concludes his interjection of Kas “biographical details” with the statement: “I dont wish to deceive you. Im an old friend of Kas, and I begin this story knowing everything that will happen to him during his time in Kars” [p. 5]. Later, during his report of Kas conversation with Necip, the narrator says of Necip, “With a childishness that amazed Ka, he opened his large green eyes, one of which would be shattered in fifty-one minutes” [p. 134]. With these direct statements of the narrators foreknowledge, what happens to the fictional conventions of plot and suspense? How does learning that the narrators name is Orhan, and that hes written something called The Black Book [p. 425], affect the readers reception of the story?

2. Kas mood at the beginning of the story is dreamlike and nostalgic: “As slowly and silently as the snow in a dream, the traveler fell into a long-desired, long-awaited reverie; cleansed by memories of innocence and childhood, he succumbed to optimism and dared to believe himself at home in this world” [p. 4]. Does Ka remain in this state of optimism and seeming innocence throughout his stay in Kars? As an exile, he is moved by a sense of returning home; does he make a mistake by believing himself at home enough to become involved in the affairs of Kars?

3. While Ka and Ipek are having coffee in the New Life Pastry Shop, they witness the murder of the director of the Institute of Education. Discuss the conversation between the Institute director and the young man who has been sent to assassinate him [pp. 38–48]. What are the elements that make the scene so effective?

4. The brief history of Kars on pages 19–21 describes a place at the crossroads of “two empires now defunct,” which has seen “endless wars, rebellions, massacres, and atrocity.” Despite Kemal Atatürks westernizing ideology (reinforced brutally by the military), Kars is sunk in poverty and hopelessness; its bourgeoisie has fled. Muhtar says, “The city of Kars and the people in itit was as if they werent real. Everyone wanted to die or to leave. . . . It was as if Id been erased from history, banished from civilization” [p. 53]. How has the towns history shaped its inhabitants ideas about themselves and their future?

5. Kas conversations with Muhtar, Blue, the boys from the religious high school, Sheikh Efendi, and Kadife [chapters 6, 8, 9, 11,13] explore the gap between traditional Islam and Western secularism. How do these conversations affect Kas sense of his spiritual condition? How strongly does he need to identify himself as a secular intellectual, and why is the possibility of his own belief in God, which he admits to, so unsettling to him?

6. Karl Marx said, “Hegel remarks somewhere that history tends to repeat itself. He forgot to add: the first time as tragedy, the second time as farce” [The Eighteenth Brumiare of Louis Bonaparte]. In the novels most farcical and tragic moments, theatrical impresario Sunay Zaim and his allies the military police stage their own intervention in the history of Kars. Does Pamuk, in these episodes so central to the story, seem to share Marxs pessimism?

7. Blue tells a story from the ancient epic Shehname: “Once upon a time, millions of people knew it by heart. . . . But now, because weve fallen under the spell of the West, weve forgotten our own stories” [p. 78]. What does he imply when he asks Ka, “Is this story so beautiful that a man could kill for it?” [p. 79]

8. At least three different perspectives are given on the suicide girls. The deputy governor tells Ka, “What is certain is that these girls were driven to suicide because they were extremely unhappy. . . . But if unhappiness were a genuine reason for suicide, half the women in Turkey would be killing themselves” [p. 14]; Ipek says, “The men give themselves to religion, and the women kill themselves” [p. 35]. Kadife argues that women commit suicide to save their pride [p. 112]. Does the novel provide an answer to the mystery of why women are killing themselves?

9. Speaking with Muhtar, Ka says, “If I were an author and Ka were a character in a book, Id say, ‘Snow reminds Ka of God! But Im not sure it would be accurate. What brings me close to God is the silence of snow” [p. 60]. Why does the snow make Ka think of God? How do Kas thoughts about his own religious beliefs change throughout the novel?

10. In getting involved with the various factions in Kars, does Ka act on his own behalf, or as the pawn of others? Is he actually, and knowingly, a double agent? As the plot progresses and Ka is moving back and forth between rival groups, what becomes most confusing? Does the readers experience mirror Kas spiritual and moral bewilderment?

11. When he travels to Kars, Ka enters another world: “Raised in Istanbul amid the middle-class comforts of Nisantas . . . Ka knew nothing of poverty; it was something beyond the house, in another world” [p. 18]. In the meeting at the Hotel Asia, a Kurdish boy says, “Ive always dreamed of the day when Id have a chance to share my ideas with the world. . . . All Id want them to print in that Frankfurt paper is this: Were not stupid, were just poor! And we have a right to want to insist on this distinction” [p. 275]. Later, Orhan asks, “How much can we ever know about love and pain in anothers heart? How much can we hope to understand those who have suffered deeper anguish, greater deprivation, and more crushing disappointments than we ourselves have known?” [p. 259] Why are these statements so central to the problems of empathy and ethics presented in the novel?

12. Does the epigraph from Dostoevsky“Well then, eliminate the people, curtail them, force them to be silent. Because the European enlightenment is more important than people”sum up the Wests arrogant approach to fundamentalist political movements? How is it relevant to the events in Kars?

13. Everyone in Kars watches television constantly; they even use the television to watch the coup as it takes place just outside their doors. Given the deliberately theatrical nature of the coup, the uncertainty as to whether the soldiers bullets are real, and Sunays death onstage during the second performance, what does Pamuk suggest about the relationship between history and fiction, reality and illusion?

14. Does Ipek love Ka, or does she still love Blue? Does she betray Ka by not going to Frankfurt with him [pp. 388–90]? In an unsent letter, Ka wrote to Ipek, “I carry the scars of my unbearable suffering on every inch of my body. Sometimes I think its not just you Ive lost, but that Ive lost everything in the world” [p. 260]. Was it foolish of Ka to think that he would be able to have the happiness that love provides? Why does Ipek decide not to go to Germany with him?

15. “Once a six-pronged snowflake crystallizes, it takes between eight and ten minutes for it to fall through the sky, lose its original shape, and vanish. . . . Ka decided that snowflakes have much in common with people. It was a snowflake that inspired ‘I, Ka” [pp. 375–76]. The poems that Ka writes in his green notebook while in Kars (kar means “snow”) align with the points on a snowflake. These poems, however, are never recorded in the novel. How seriously should a reader take Kas efforts as a poet? What is the significance of the fact that the poems are not available to the reader, but instead we have a novel called Snow?

16. In several of his novels, Pamuk has created characters who are doubles or alter egos. Here he gives us Ka and the narrator as well as Necip and Fazil. Late in the story, the narrator follows Kas trail on a reading tour through various German cities; he wished “to do exactly as Ka had done on his own tour seven weeks earlier. . . . I would wander through the cold empty city and pretend I was Ka walking the same streets to escape the painful memories of Ipek ” [p. 378–379]. Upon following Kas trail to Kars, he notes, “I shouldnt want my readers to imagine that I was trying to become his posthumous shadow” [p. 380]. What do these statements imply?

17. How is Kadife different from her sister Ipek ? What motivates her to go onstage and bare her head in Sunays play? Is she a devout Muslim, or is wearing the headscarf simply a costume necessary for her love affair with Blue?

18. Reexamine Necips story [pp. 104–7] once youve reached the end of the novel. Has Necips tale foreseen the revelations about the narrator and his love for Ipek, as well as Fazils marriage to Kadife? How does Necip live on after his death? How does Ka?

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 8 comments:

lukas, March 2, 2014 (view all comments by lukas)
I think it's safe to say that Nobel laureate Orhan Pamuk is Turkey's greatest living novelist (Go ahead, name another Turkish novelist) and that this is his most famous and well-regarded book. Turkey is a country caught between Europe and the Middle East, between the future and the past, between secularism and Islam and Pamuk eloquently and perceptively captures these tensions in this novel about an exiled poet returning home. The mixture of the political and personal reminded me somewhat of Czech novelists like Kundera and Klima.
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readaway, January 30, 2013 (view all comments by readaway)
Loved this story. Beautifully worked. Intrigue, enigmatic characters, took me through a place and time that I've never experienced. Would read again!
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(1 of 2 readers found this comment helpful)
tuoro2, January 14, 2010 (view all comments by tuoro2)
A powerful and beautifully written novel providing insight into Turkish culture, the plight of eastern Turkey, religion v. secularism, politics, the pull of Western society, and the nature of love, through the lens of Pamuk's singular brand of humor/satire. Worth reading twice!
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(1 of 4 readers found this comment helpful)
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Product Details

ISBN:
9780375706868
Author:
Pamuk, Orhan
Publisher:
Vintage Books USA
Author:
PAMUK, ORHAN
Subject:
General
Subject:
Literary
Subject:
Social conditions
Subject:
Journalists
Subject:
Turkey Social conditions 1960-
Subject:
Journalists -- Turkey.
Subject:
Literature-A to Z
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Series:
Vintage International
Publication Date:
20050731
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
480
Dimensions:
8 x 5.14 x 1.03 in .75 lb

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Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z
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Snow Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$6.95 In Stock
Product details 480 pages Vintage Books USA - English 9780375706868 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "A Turkish poet who spent 12 years as a political exile in Germany witnesses firsthand the clash between radical Islam and Western ideals in this enigmatically beautiful novel. Ka's reasons for visiting the small Turkish town of Kars are twofold: curiosity about the rash of suicides by young girls in the town and a hope to reconnect with 'the beautiful Ipek,' whom he knew as a youth. But Kars is a tangle of poverty-stricken families, Kurdish separatists, political Islamists (including Ipek's spirited sister Kadife) and Ka finds himself making compromises with all in a desperate play for his own happiness. Ka encounters government officials, idealistic students, leftist theater groups and the charismatic and perhaps terroristic Blue while trying to convince Ipek to return to Germany with him; each conversation pits warring ideologies against each other and against Ka's own weary melancholy. Pamuk himself becomes an important character, as he describes his attempts to piece together 'what really happened' in the few days his friend Ka spent in Kars, during which snow cuts off the town from the rest of the world and a bloody coup from an unexpected source hurtles toward a startling climax. Pamuk's sometimes exhaustive conversations and descriptions create a stark picture of a too-little-known part of the world, where politics, religion and even happiness can seem alternately all-consuming and irrelevant. A detached tone and some dogmatic abstractions make for tough reading, but Ka's rediscovery of God and poetry in a desolate place makes the novel's sadness profound and moving. Agent, Andrew Wylie." Publishers Weekly (Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review" by , "Richly detailed....A thrilling plot ingeniously shaped...Vividly embodies and painstakingly explores the collision of Western values with Islamic fundamentalism....An astonishingly complex, disturbing view of a world we owe it to ourselves to better understand."
"Review" by , "A devastating parable of political extremism."
"Review" by , "A novel of profound relevance to the present moment. The debate between the forces of secularism and those of religious fanaticism is conducted with subtle, painful insight into the human weakness that can underlie both impulses."
"Review" by , "[A] great and almost irresistibly beguiling novelist....[Snow] is enriched by the author's mesmerizing mixes: cruelty and farce, poetry and violence, and a voice whose timbres range from a storyteller's playfulness to the dark torment of an explorer, lost."
"Review" by , "[A]n engrossing feat of tale-spinning...essential reading for our times....Snow is eerily prescient, both in its analyses of fundamentalist attitudes and in the nature of the repression and rage and conspiracies and violence it depicts."
"Review" by , "Powerful....Astonishingly timely....A deft melding of political intrigue and philosophy, romance and noir...[Snow] is forever confounding our expectations."
"Review" by , "[T]he political novel makes a triumphant return....As if Nabokov and Rushdie had taken their circus act on the road, or Carlos Fuentes were Anatolian instead of Aztec, or Milan Kundera remembered how to laugh."
"Review" by , "Once [all the characters are] in place...the novel picks up and ultimately is a worthwhile read for those interested in a closer look at the hot topics of religion, its devout followers, and what arises from such passions."
"Synopsis" by , From the acclaimed author of My Name Is Red comes a spellbinding tale of disparate yearnings — for love, art, power and God — set in a remote Turkish town, where stirrings of political Islamism threaten to unravel the secular order.
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