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1 Burnside US History- Colonial America

In the Devil's Snare: The Salem Witchcraft Crisis of 1692

by

In the Devil's Snare: The Salem Witchcraft Crisis of 1692 Cover

ISBN13: 9780375706905
ISBN10: 0375706909
Condition: Standard
All Product Details

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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

An admired historian offers a unique account of the events at Salem, Massachusetts, helping readers to understand the witch hunt as it was understood by those who lived through the frenzy.

Review:

"Byatt is a writer who struggles mightily to be the undertaker of her own silliness. She buries what George Eliot called 'feminine fatuity' under a mountain of bibliographic cavil. Byatt is credited with being a novelist of ideas, but really she is a melodramatic pedant. She sees herself as the granddaughter of Eliot, who taught her, she has written, that characters can 'worry an idea, they are, within their limits, responsive to politics and art and philosophy and history.' She seems not to have noticed that Eliot's greatness has something to do with her patient tapping out of the individual keys of moral slippage, her intelligent and humane and believable descriptions of complexity, which is never confused with aesthetic and historical filigree. Byatt prefers wiggly surfaces to sure depths. She depends on her readers' exhaustion, or insecurity, to claim Eliot's mantle. Who, after all, could be left standing, in a mood for close reading — let alone considered thinking — after ingesting the learnedness with which Byatt lards the four novels of her quartet?" Lorraine Adams, The New Republic (read the entire New Republic review)

Review:

"Norton is an especially productive and influential scholar, specializing in the history of women in colonial and revolutionary America. As a feminist, Norton initially felt drawn to the Salem story because it pivoted around female protagonists: the accusing girls and most of the accused witches. In Puritan society, the reinforcing hierarchies of gender, age, and wealth ordinarily cast young women working as household servants at the social bottom....But deeper research soon persuaded Norton that the primary, long-hidden story required closer attention to 'the hitherto neglected men accused in 1692,' especially Reverend George Burroughs. The writing of social history has certainly reached a new stage when a leading feminist scholar can conclude that her peers have so successfully rescued colonial women from obscurity that ? at least for the Salem story ? we have lost sight of pivotal characters because they were men." Alan Taylor, The New Republic (read the entire New Republic review)

About the Author

Mary Beth Norton is Mary Donlon Alger Professor of American History at Cornell University. She is the author of The British-Americans: The Loyalist Exiles in England, 1774—1789 (1972); Libertys Daughters: The Revolutionary Experience of American Women, 1750—1800 (1980); Founding Mothers & Fathers: Gendered Power and the Forming of American Society (1996), which was a Pulitzer Prize finalist; and (with five others) A People and a Nation (6th ed., 2001). She has also edited several works on womens history and served as the general editor of The AHA Guide to Historical Literature (3rd ed., 1995).

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

lukas, November 26, 2013 (view all comments by lukas)
Almost everything Americans know about the Salem Witch Trials is from Arthur Miller's "The Crucible," which is really about McCarthyism. I'm teaching the play to high school students and wanted to get a little more historical context. Norton's book is thoroughly researched, but also a little exhausting for the common reader. She admirably refrains from modern judgement, but I also would have liked a little more commentary. Still, it's an important book for anyone interested in this fascinating/terrifying period in our history, and I did learn the John Proctor, unlike the character in the play, was in his 60s. -
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No

Product Details

ISBN:
9780375706905
Author:
Norton, Mary Beth
Publisher:
Vintage Books
Location:
New York
Subject:
Women
Subject:
Massachusetts
Subject:
Witchcraft
Subject:
United States - Colonial Period
Subject:
Trials
Subject:
Salem
Subject:
Essex County Region
Subject:
Witchcraft -- Massachusetts.
Subject:
Massachusetts History.
Subject:
United States / Colonial Period(1600-1775)
Subject:
US History-Colonial America
Subject:
history;witchcraft;non-fiction;salem;massachusetts;american history;religion;17th century;new england;salem witch trials;women;witches;witch trials;trials;colonial;women s studies;women s history;witch hunts;gender;colonial america;us;american;us history;
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Series:
Vintage
Series Volume:
107-941
Publication Date:
20031031
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
3 MAPS
Pages:
448
Dimensions:
8 x 5.2 x 0.87 in 0.75 lb

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Related Subjects

History and Social Science » US History » Colonial America
History and Social Science » US History » General
Metaphysics » History of Witchcraft
Metaphysics » Magic Witchcraft and Paganism
Metaphysics » Wicca and Goddess Worship

In the Devil's Snare: The Salem Witchcraft Crisis of 1692 Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$7.95 In Stock
Product details 448 pages Vintage Books USA - English 9780375706905 Reviews:
"Review" by , "Byatt is a writer who struggles mightily to be the undertaker of her own silliness. She buries what George Eliot called 'feminine fatuity' under a mountain of bibliographic cavil. Byatt is credited with being a novelist of ideas, but really she is a melodramatic pedant. She sees herself as the granddaughter of Eliot, who taught her, she has written, that characters can 'worry an idea, they are, within their limits, responsive to politics and art and philosophy and history.' She seems not to have noticed that Eliot's greatness has something to do with her patient tapping out of the individual keys of moral slippage, her intelligent and humane and believable descriptions of complexity, which is never confused with aesthetic and historical filigree. Byatt prefers wiggly surfaces to sure depths. She depends on her readers' exhaustion, or insecurity, to claim Eliot's mantle. Who, after all, could be left standing, in a mood for close reading — let alone considered thinking — after ingesting the learnedness with which Byatt lards the four novels of her quartet?" (read the entire New Republic review)
"Review" by , "Norton is an especially productive and influential scholar, specializing in the history of women in colonial and revolutionary America. As a feminist, Norton initially felt drawn to the Salem story because it pivoted around female protagonists: the accusing girls and most of the accused witches. In Puritan society, the reinforcing hierarchies of gender, age, and wealth ordinarily cast young women working as household servants at the social bottom....But deeper research soon persuaded Norton that the primary, long-hidden story required closer attention to 'the hitherto neglected men accused in 1692,' especially Reverend George Burroughs. The writing of social history has certainly reached a new stage when a leading feminist scholar can conclude that her peers have so successfully rescued colonial women from obscurity that ? at least for the Salem story ? we have lost sight of pivotal characters because they were men." (read the entire New Republic review)
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