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1 Burnside - Bldg. 2 Environmental Studies- Food and Famine

Eat Here: Reclaiming Homegrown Pleasures in a Global Supermarket

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Eat Here: Reclaiming Homegrown Pleasures in a Global Supermarket Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Eating locally is a growing movement that is good for your health—but even better for the planet.

Everyone everywhere depends increasingly on long-distance food. Since 1961 the tonnage of food shipped between nations has grown fourfold. In the United States, food typically travels between 1,500 and 2,500 miles from farm to plate — as much as 25 percent farther than in 1980. For some, the long-distance food system offers unparalleled choice. But it often runs roughshod over local cuisines, varieties, and agriculture, while consuming staggering amounts of fuel, generating greenhouse gases, eroding the pleasures of face-to-face interactions, and compromising food security. Fortunately, the long-distance food habit is beginning to weaken under the influence of a young, but surging, local-foods movement. From peanut-butter makers in Zimbabwe to pork producers in Germany and rooftop gardeners in Vancouver, entrepreneurial farmers, start-up food businesses, restaurants, supermarkets, and concerned consumers are propelling a revolution that can help restore rural areas, enrich poor nations, and return fresh, delicious, and wholesome food to cities.

Review:

"Some people may ask, 'what's wrong with getting my food from some distant land, if the food is cheap and the system works?' The point Halweil, a senior researcher at the Worldwatch Institute, makes throughout this book is that those prices are artificially low, and the system is actually broken. Halweil's writing is journalistic in its reliance on interviews with farmers and activists, but the book's abundant statistics, graphs and suggestions for action lend it the tone of a policy paper — one that is, nonetheless, impassioned and accessible. Halweil gives readers reasons for pessimism (the thousands of gallons of fossil fuel used to ship fresh greens around the world; unprecedented risks of contaminated food) and optimism (the spread of 'farm shops' across Europe; the Vermont diner that's thriving by using almost entirely local food); fortunately, his optimism usually prevails. Following each chapter is a short success story, such as that of David Cole, who jumpstarted Hawaii's cattle-raising and crop-raising business. Halweil makes a strong argument that a system dominated by 'globe-trotting food' sold in impersonal megastores is bad for the health of economies and people alike, while 'eating local' and encouraging regional self-sufficiency is good for both the environment and the human race. Besides highlighting projects already underway, which will inspire and encourage farmers and activists everywhere, Halweil offers ideas for the individual consumer (such as hosting a 'harvest party' at your home or in your community). Even when describing the decline of local agriculture, his tone remains upbeat. An essential read for those interested in the sustainable agriculture movement, this book may also appeal to general foodies and those who are concerned about the land and the environment." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"A definite 'must read' for farmers, food activists and the general public." John Jeavons, author of How to Grow More Vegetables

Review:

"An insightful and timely book indicating just how important food, farms and rural cultures are to our increasingly hurried economies and societies" Jules Pretty, author of Agri-Culture: Reconnecting People, Land, and Nature

Review:

"Finally someone has put this all together! Brian Halwell has laid it all out in one place, with one coherent argument. Now it is up to the rest of us to do something with this amazing gift of a book." Mark Ritchie, President of the Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy in Minneapolis

Book News Annotation:

Advocate Halweil has never met a homegrown cabbage he did not like, and for good reason: growing locally, whether in one's own earth or through patronage of local professional producers, invariably results in food that tastes like food rather than bleached plastic. He cites the example of the "intercontinental lettuce" and the poor food quality (not to mention threats to food safety) inherent in a national or international food economy. Including a number of case studies in which local people began using local supply as their primary source of food, Halweil shows how consumers and producers can create short-chain food economies whether the locale is Brazil, Massachusetts, or even East Hampton. He also urges both consumers and producers to think local and avoid dealing with the big-box chains and their mentality. Annotation ©2006 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Synopsis:

Tracking the history of the distances food travels from the farm to the plate, Halweil explains how the long-distance food system offers unparalleled choice. But it often runs roughshod over local cuisines, and agriculture. Halweil also explains that a surging local-food movement is beginning to erode the long-distance food habit.

About the Author

Brian Halweil, a senior researcher at the Worldwatch Institute, writes on the social and ecological impacts of how we grow food. He lives in Sag Harbor, New York.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780393326642
Author:
Halweil, Brian
Publisher:
W. W. Norton & Company
Author:
Halweil, Brian
Subject:
Agriculture - General
Subject:
Ecology
Copyright:
Series:
The Worldwatch Environmental Alert Series
Publication Date:
20041131
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Y
Pages:
256
Dimensions:
8.2 x 5.5 x 0.8 in 0.7 lb

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Related Subjects


Business » Management
Cooking and Food » Sustainable Cooking
Home and Garden » Sustainable Living » Food
Science and Mathematics » Agriculture » General
Science and Mathematics » Environmental Studies » Environment
Science and Mathematics » Environmental Studies » Food and Famine

Eat Here: Reclaiming Homegrown Pleasures in a Global Supermarket Used Trade Paper
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$5.50 In Stock
Product details 256 pages W. W. Norton & Company - English 9780393326642 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Some people may ask, 'what's wrong with getting my food from some distant land, if the food is cheap and the system works?' The point Halweil, a senior researcher at the Worldwatch Institute, makes throughout this book is that those prices are artificially low, and the system is actually broken. Halweil's writing is journalistic in its reliance on interviews with farmers and activists, but the book's abundant statistics, graphs and suggestions for action lend it the tone of a policy paper — one that is, nonetheless, impassioned and accessible. Halweil gives readers reasons for pessimism (the thousands of gallons of fossil fuel used to ship fresh greens around the world; unprecedented risks of contaminated food) and optimism (the spread of 'farm shops' across Europe; the Vermont diner that's thriving by using almost entirely local food); fortunately, his optimism usually prevails. Following each chapter is a short success story, such as that of David Cole, who jumpstarted Hawaii's cattle-raising and crop-raising business. Halweil makes a strong argument that a system dominated by 'globe-trotting food' sold in impersonal megastores is bad for the health of economies and people alike, while 'eating local' and encouraging regional self-sufficiency is good for both the environment and the human race. Besides highlighting projects already underway, which will inspire and encourage farmers and activists everywhere, Halweil offers ideas for the individual consumer (such as hosting a 'harvest party' at your home or in your community). Even when describing the decline of local agriculture, his tone remains upbeat. An essential read for those interested in the sustainable agriculture movement, this book may also appeal to general foodies and those who are concerned about the land and the environment." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review" by , "A definite 'must read' for farmers, food activists and the general public."
"Review" by , "An insightful and timely book indicating just how important food, farms and rural cultures are to our increasingly hurried economies and societies"
"Review" by , "Finally someone has put this all together! Brian Halwell has laid it all out in one place, with one coherent argument. Now it is up to the rest of us to do something with this amazing gift of a book."
"Synopsis" by , Tracking the history of the distances food travels from the farm to the plate, Halweil explains how the long-distance food system offers unparalleled choice. But it often runs roughshod over local cuisines, and agriculture. Halweil also explains that a surging local-food movement is beginning to erode the long-distance food habit.
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