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1 Beaverton Nature Studies- Botany
1 Burnside Botany- Grasses and Weeds

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All about Weeds

by

All about Weeds Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

We spray them, pluck them, and bury them under mulch; and we curse their resilience when they spring back into place. To most of us, weeds are a nuisance, not worth the dirt they are growing in. But the fact is weeds are a plant just like any other, and it is only we who designate them as a weed or not, as a plant we will dote over or one we will tear out of the earth with abandon. And as Nina Edwards shows in this history, that designation is constantly changing. Balancing popular history with botanical science, she tells the story of the lowly, but proud, weed, a story that is just as much about the kinds of attitudes we foster toward the plants we grow and those we try to suppress.

and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;

As Edwards shows, the idea of the weed is a slippery one, constantly changing under different needs, fashions, and contexts. In a tightly controlled field of corn, a scarlet poppy is a bright red intruder, but in other parts of the world it is a symbolically important cultural symbol, a potent and lucrative pharmaceutical source, or simply a beautiful, lakeside ornament. What we consider a pestandmdash;Aristolochia Rotunda, or andquot;fat henandquot;andmdash;was, in Neolithic times, a staple crop, its seeds an important source of nutrition. Sprinkled with personal anecdotes and loads of useful information, Weeds sketches history after history of the fashions and attitudes that have shaped our gardens, showing us that it is just as important what we keep out of them as what we put in, and that just because we despise one species does not mean that there havenandrsquo;t been others whose very lives have depended on it.

Synopsis:

For 102 of most common U.S. weeds: common and scientific names; delightful, detailed descriptions; multiple identification keys. 102 illus.

Synopsis:

At first thought weeds seem to be nothing more than intruders in a well-manicured lawn. But in reality a weed is only a weed because it has been deemed so; they spring up where they are not wanted, so they are removed without a second thought. But the idea of a weed is constantly changing, with the definition shifting based on the context. In a field of corn the scarlet poppy is considered to be a weed, because it does not belong with the rest of the crops. But in history what we now consider to be weeds once had practical uses; from Neolithic times until the early sixteenth century, the weed called and#8220;fat henand#8221; was considered a vegetable, and its seeds were used to make flour. Yet despite the idea that weeds can be helpful to our ecology, they are still considered to be harmful, a nuisance in our gardens.

Weeds by Nina Edwards discusses the history of weeds, and how certain plants come to be regarded as weeds and not others. Sprinkled with personal anecdotes and full of useful information, Weeds is a helpful resource for understanding exactly what turns an ordinary plant into a weed in varying contexts.

Synopsis:

Pigweed, dogbane, crabgrass, spiderwort, poison ivy, yellow dock — a total of 102 common weeds are presented with technical precision and humor. Each is splendidly illustrated and identified through multiple keys by means of physical characteristics, type of soil, and much more.

Synopsis:

For 102 of most common U.S. weeds: common and scientific names; identification keys.

About the Author

Nina Edwards is a freelance writer who lives in London. She is the author of Offal: A Global History, also published by Reaktion Books.and#160;

Table of Contents

PREFACE

I "THE REASONS FOR "JUST WEEDS"

    HABITAT AND SEASONAL INDEXES

    I. Weeds of the Lawn and Yard

    II. Weeds of the Garden and Truck Patch

    III. Weeds of the Meadow and Pasture Lands

    IV. Weeds of the Corn and Cotton Fields

    V. Weeds of Winter Wheat and Clover Fields

    VI. Weeds of the Farm Lots

    VII. Worst Weeds of Wayside and Waste Places

    VIII. Weeds of Moist and Wet Places

    IX. Weeds of Springtime

    X. Weeds of Summer

    XI. Weeds of Autumn

    XII. Weeds of Winter

II WEEDS THAT ARE GRASSLIKE

    "(The order of arrangement of the plants is that found in Gray's Manual of Botany, but this list has been alphabetized for convenient reference)"

      Barnyard grass (Echinochloa crusgalli)

      Bermuda grass (Cynodon dactylon)

      Broom-sedge (Andropogon virginicus)

      Calamus (Acorus calamus)

      Cheat (Bromus seclainus)

      Crab grass (Digitaria sanguinalis)

      Fall panic grass (Panicum dichotomiflorum)

      Goose grass (Eleusine indica)

      Johnson grass (Sorghum halepense)

      Needle grass (Aristida oligantha)

      Nimble Will (Muhlenbergia Schreberi)

      Sandbur (Cenchrus tribuloides)

      Spiderwort (Tradescantia reflexa)

      Squirrel-tail grass (Hordeum jabatum)

      Tall red top (Tridens flavus)

      Wild barley (Hordeum nodosum)

      Wild garlic (Allium vineale)

      Wire grass (Juncus tenuis)

      Yellow foxtail (Setaria lutescens)

      Yellow nut grass (Cyperus esculentus)

III WEEDS THAT ARE NOT GRASSLIKE

    "(The order of arrangement of the plants is that found in Gray's Manual of Botany, but this list has been alphabetized for convenient reference)"

      Bedstraw (Galium aparine)

      Black nightshade (Solanum nigrum)

      Blue vervain (Verbena stricta)

      Bouncing Bet (Saponaria officinalis)

      Bracted plantain (Plantago aristata)

      Buck brush (Symphoricarpos orbiculatus)

      Buckhorn (Plantago lanceolata)

      Burdock (Arctium lappa)

      Canada thistle (Cirsium arvense)

      Carpet weed (Mollugo verticillata)

      Catnip (Nepeta cataria)

      Chicory (Cichorium intybus)

      Chickweed (Stellaria media)

      Cocklebur (Xanthium orientale)

      Common mallow (Malva rotundifolia)

      Common plantain (Plantago major)

      Corn cockle (Agrostemma githago)

      Creeping Jenny (Convolvulus arvensis)

      Daisy fleabane (Erigeron annuus)

      Dandelion (Taraxacum officinale)

      Dogbane (Apocynum cannabinum)

      Dog fennel (Anthemis cotula)

      Evening primrose (Enothera biennis)

      False mallow (Sida spinosa)

      Flower-of-an-hour (Hibiscus trionum)

      Gill-over-the-ground (Nepeta hederacea)

      Goldenrod (Solidago canadensis)

      Heal-all (Prunella vulgaris)

      Horehound (Marrubium vulgare)

      Horse mint (Monarda fistulosa)

      Horse nettle (Solanum carolinense)

      Horsetail fleabane (Erigeron canadensis)

      Ironweed (Vernonia altissima)

      Jimson weed (Datura stramonium)

      Knotgrass (Polygonum aviculare)

      Lamb's quarters (Chenopodium album)

      Late-flowering thoroughwort (Eupatorium serotinum)

      Man-under-ground (Ipomœa pandurata)

      Milkweed (Asclepias syriaca)

      Moneywort (Lysimachia nummularia)

      Morning glory (Impomœa purpurea)

      Motherwort (Leonurus cardiaca)

      Moth mullein (Verbascum blattaria)

      Mullein (Verbascum thapsus)

      Ox-eye daisy (Chrysanthemum leucanthemum)

      Pennsylvania smartweed (Polyganum pennsylvanicum)

      Peppergrass (Lepidium virginicum)

      Pigweed (Amaranthus rectroflexus)

      Poison Ivy (Rhus toxicodendron)

      Pokeweed (Phytolacca decandra)

      Poor Joe (Diodia teres)

      Pursley (Portulaca oleracea)

      Queen Anne's lace (Daucus carota)

      Ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia)

      Sheep sorrel (Rumex acetosella)

      Shepherd's purse (Capsella bursa-pastoris)

      Shoestring smartweed (Polygonum Muhlenbergii)

      Small-flowered buttercup (Ranunculus abortivus)

      Smartweed (Polygonum hydropiper)

      Snow-on-the-mountain (Euphorbia marginata)

      Spanish needles (Bidens aristosa)

      Spotted spurge (Euphorbia nutans)

      Sweet clover (Melilotus alba)

      Thorny pigweed (Amaranthus rectroflexus)

      Three-seeded mercury (Acalypha virginica)

      Trumpet creeper (Tecoma radicans)

      Velvet-leaf (Abutilon theophrasti)

      Vining milkweed (Gonolobus lœvis)

      White clover (Trifolium repens)

      White snakeroot (Eupatorium urticœfolium)

      White vervain (Verbena urticœfolia)

      Wild bean vine (Strophostyles helvola)

      Wild geranium (Geranium carolinianum)

      Wild lettuce (Lactuca scariola)

      Wild morning glory (Convolvulus sepium)

      Wild mustard (Brassica arvensis)

      Wild parsnip (Pastinaca sativa)

      Wild sunflower (Helianthus grosseserratus)

      Wild touch-me-not (Impatiens biflora)

      Yarrow (Achillia millefolium)

      Yellow dock (Rumex crispus)

IV WEED CONTROL

Product Details

ISBN:
9780486230511
Author:
Bergdolt, Emma
Author:
Bergdolt, Emma
Author:
Spencer, Edwin R.
Author:
Edwards, Nina
Publisher:
Dover Publications
Location:
New York :
Subject:
Reference
Subject:
Agriculture & Animal Husbandry
Subject:
United states
Subject:
Plants
Subject:
Flowers, plants and trees
Subject:
Botany
Subject:
Weeds
Subject:
Weeds -- United States.
Subject:
Life Sciences - Botany
Subject:
Plants - General
Subject:
General Nature
Subject:
common weeds
Subject:
Weed control.
Subject:
grasslike weeds
Subject:
GARDENING / Reference
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Hardcover
Series:
Reaktion Books - Botanical
Series Volume:
no. 2
Publication Date:
20111131
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Language:
English
Illustrations:
70 color plates, 30 halftones
Pages:
224
Dimensions:
8.5 x 5.5 in

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Related Subjects

Home and Garden » Gardening » Botany
Home and Garden » Gardening » Reference
Science and Mathematics » Botany » General
Science and Mathematics » Botany » Grasses and Weeds
Science and Mathematics » Nature Studies » Botany

All about Weeds Used Trade Paper
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$4.95 In Stock
Product details 224 pages Dover Publications - English 9780486230511 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by ,
For 102 of most common U.S. weeds: common and scientific names; delightful, detailed descriptions; multiple identification keys. 102 illus.

"Synopsis" by ,

At first thought weeds seem to be nothing more than intruders in a well-manicured lawn. But in reality a weed is only a weed because it has been deemed so; they spring up where they are not wanted, so they are removed without a second thought. But the idea of a weed is constantly changing, with the definition shifting based on the context. In a field of corn the scarlet poppy is considered to be a weed, because it does not belong with the rest of the crops. But in history what we now consider to be weeds once had practical uses; from Neolithic times until the early sixteenth century, the weed called and#8220;fat henand#8221; was considered a vegetable, and its seeds were used to make flour. Yet despite the idea that weeds can be helpful to our ecology, they are still considered to be harmful, a nuisance in our gardens.

Weeds by Nina Edwards discusses the history of weeds, and how certain plants come to be regarded as weeds and not others. Sprinkled with personal anecdotes and full of useful information, Weeds is a helpful resource for understanding exactly what turns an ordinary plant into a weed in varying contexts.

"Synopsis" by ,
Pigweed, dogbane, crabgrass, spiderwort, poison ivy, yellow dock — a total of 102 common weeds are presented with technical precision and humor. Each is splendidly illustrated and identified through multiple keys by means of physical characteristics, type of soil, and much more.
"Synopsis" by , For 102 of most common U.S. weeds: common and scientific names; identification keys.
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