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Miles: The Autobiography

by

Miles: The Autobiography Cover

ISBN13: 9780671725822
ISBN10: 0671725823
Condition: Standard
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Excerpt

Chapter 1

The very first thing I remember in my early childhood is a flame, a blue flame jumping off a gas stove somebody lit. It might have been me playing around with the stove. I don't remember who it was. Anyway, I remember being shocked by the whoosh of the blue flame jumping off the burner, the suddenness of it. That's as far back as I can remember; any further back than this is just fog, you know, just mystery. But that stove flame is as clear as music is in my mind. I was three years old.

I saw that flame and felt that hotness of it close to my face. I felt fear, real fear, for the first time in my life. But I remember it also like some kind of adventure, some kind of weird joy, too. I guess that experience took me someplace in my head I hadn't been before. To some frontier, the edge, maybe, of everything possible. I don't know; I never tried to analyze it before. The fear I had was almost like an invitation, a challenge to go forward into something I knew nothing about. That's where I think my personal philosophy of life and my commitment to everything I believe in started, with that moment. I don't know, but I think it might be true. Who knows? What the fuck did I know about anything back then? In my mind I have always believed and thought since then that my motion had to be forward, away from the heat of that flame.

Looking back, I don't remember much of my first years — I never liked to look back much anyway. But one thing I do know is that the year after I was born a bad tornado hit St. Louis and tore it all up. Seems like I remember something about that — something in the bottom of my memory. Maybe that's why I have such a bad temper sometimes; that tornado left some of its violent creativity in me. Maybe it left some of its strong winds. You know, you need strong wind to play trumpet. I do believe in mystery and the supernatural and a tornado sure enough is mysterious and supernatural.

I was born May 26, 1926, in Alton, Illinois, a little river town up on the Mississippi River about twenty-five miles north of East St. Louis. I was named after my father; he was named after his father. That made me Miles Dewey Davis III, but everybody in my family called me Junior. I always hated that nickname.

My father was from Arkansas. He grew up there on a farm that his father, Miles Dewey Davis I, owned. My grandfather was a bookkeeper, so good at what he did he did it for white people and made a whole lot of money. He bought five hundred acres of land in Arkansas around the turn of the century. When he bought all that land, the white people in the area who had used him to straighten out their financial matters, their money books, turned against him. Ran him off his land. In their minds, a black man wasn't supposed to have all that land and all that money. He wasn't supposed to be smart, smarter than them. It hasn't changed too much; things are like that even today.

For most of my life my grandfather lived under threats from white men. He even used his son, my Uncle Frank, as a bodyguard to protect him from them. The Davises were always ahead of the game, my father and grandfather told me. And I believed them. They told me that people in our family were special people — artists, businessmen, professionals, and musicians — who played for the plantation owners back in the old days before slavery was over. These Davises played classical music, according to my grandfather. That's the reason my father couldn't play or listen to music after slavery was over, because my grandfather said, "They only let black people play in gin houses and honky-tonks." What he meant was that they — the white people — didn't want to listen to no black folks playing classical music anymore; they only wanted to hear them sing spirituals or the blues. Now, I don't know how true this is, but that's what my father told me.

My father also told me my grandfather told him that whenever he got some money, no matter where or who he got it from, to count it and see if it was all there. He said you can't trust no one when it comes to money, not even people in your family. One time my grandfather gave my father what he said was $1,000 and sent him to the bank with it. The bank was thirty miles away from where they lived. It was about 100 degrees in the shade — summertime in Arkansas. And he had to walk and ride a horse. When my father got down there to the bank, he counted the money and there was only $950. He counted it again and got the same amount: $950. So he went on back home, so scared he was just about ready to shit in his pants. When he got back he went to my grandfather and said that he lost $50. So Grandpa just stood there and looked at him and said, "Did you count the money before you left? Do you know if it was all there?" My father said, no, he didn't count the money before he left. "That's right," my grandfather told him, "because I didn't give you nothing but $950. You didn't lose anything. But didn't I tell you to count the money, anybody's money, even mine? Here's $50. Count it. And then go ahead on back and put that money in the bank like I told you." Now what you got to keep in mind about all of this is that not only was the bank thirty miles away but it was hotter than a motherfucker. It was cold of my grandfather to do that. But sometimes you've got to be cold like that. It was a lesson my father never forgot and he passed it on to his kids. So today I count all my money.

My father, like my mother, Cleota Henry Davis, was born in 1900 in Arkansas. He went to elementary school there. My father and his brothers and sisters didn't go to high school, just skipped right over it and went straight to college. He graduated from Arkansas Baptist College, from Lincoln University in Pennsylvania, and from Northwestern University's College of Dentistry, so my father received three degrees and I remember looking at them motherfuckers up on his office wall after I got older and saying, "Goddamn, I hope he won't ask me to do that." I also remember seeing a picture somewhere of his graduating class from Northwestern and counting only three black faces there. He was twenty-four when he graduated from Northwestern.

His brother, Ferdinand, went to Harvard and some college in Berlin. He was a year or two older than my father, and like my father, he skipped over high school. He went straight into college after passing the entrance exam with high scores. He was a brilliant guy also; used to talk to me all the time about Caesar and Hannibal, and black history. He traveled all over the world. He was more intellectual than my father, and a ladies' man and player, editor of a magazine called Color. He was so smart he made me feel almost dumb; he was the only person I knew growing up who made me feel this way. Uncle Ferdinand was something else. I loved being around him, hearing him talk and tell stories about his travels, his women. And he was stylish as a motherfucker, too. I hung around him so n that my mother would get mad.

My father got out of Northwestern and married my mother. She played the violin and the piano. Her mother had been an organ teacher in Arkansas. She never talked much about her father, so I don't know much about her side of the family, never did, never asked either. I don't know why that is. From what I have heard of them, though, and the ones I did meet, they seemed to be middle class and a little uppity in their attitudes.

My mother was a beautiful woman. She had a whole lot of style, with an East Indian, Carmen McRae look, and dark, nut-brown, smooth skin. High cheekbones and Indian-like hair. Big beautiful eyes. Me and my brother Vernon looked like her. She had mink coats, diamonds; she was a very glamorous woman who was into all kinds of hats and things, and all my mother's friends seemed just as glamorous to me as she was. She always dressed to kill. I got my looks

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Average customer rating based on 2 comments:

prufrock31, August 10, 2012 (view all comments by prufrock31)
Told in Miles Davis' own voice - alternately angry, ecstatic, or philosophical - this book was full of surprises for me. I hadn't realized to what extent so many of the jazz greats were (and are) interconnected, as bandmates, rivals, and friends, and I was even more surprised to learn how educated Miles was about things like art and classical music; he was fascinated by the work of Stravinsky and Stockhausen, and knew Sartre personally. All in all, this book is both gripping and highly informative, a great introduction to jazz history.
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jacqueiseals, December 17, 2008 (view all comments by jacqueiseals)
This book took me indepth in his private life so much until I felt I was there with him especially in the private sector when he was from place to place gigging. I personally know what that is like from when I used to "hang" in NYC in Harlem with a very dear friend of mine who is now deceased, Jack McDuff.
The book was so embracing that I literally had to put the book down as I was moving too fast in the fast paced life that he led. I loved it but it got to me and I may pick it back up and finish it now but it reminded me of back in the day when I was "hanging out". Also, I've never been into any book and it have that effect on me as this one did.
This book is awesome so do read it and experience it for yourself.
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Product Details

ISBN:
9780671725822
With:
Troupe, Quincy
Author:
Troupe, Quincy
Author:
Davis, Miles
Author:
Davies, Miles
Publisher:
Simon & Schuster
Location:
New York :
Subject:
General
Subject:
People of Color
Subject:
Biography
Subject:
Music
Subject:
Jazz
Subject:
Composers & Musicians - Jazz
Subject:
Davis, miles, 1926-1991
Subject:
Jazz musicians
Subject:
Composers & Musicians
Subject:
Jazz musicians -- United States -- Biography.
Subject:
General Biography
Subject:
Genres & Styles - Jazz
Subject:
cultural heritage
Subject:
Davis, Miles
Copyright:
Edition Number:
1st Touchstone ed.
Edition Description:
B102
Series Volume:
2
Publication Date:
January 1990
Binding:
Paperback
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Yes
Pages:
448
Dimensions:
9.25 x 6.12 in 17.885 oz

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Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Music » Genres and Styles » Jazz » Biographies
Biography » General

Miles: The Autobiography Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$8.50 In Stock
Product details 448 pages Simon & Schuster - English 9780671725822 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , Miles Davis--a performer famous fornottalking--tells all: from his brilliant musical debut with Charles Parker and Dizzy Gillespie, to his creative encounters with such greats as John Coltrane and Herbie Hancock; from his recording of such classics as Porgy and Bess, to his pioneer work in the jazz fusion movement. Serials in Vanity Fair and Spin Magazine.
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