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A Short History of Distributive Justice

A Short History of Distributive Justice Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Distributive justice in its modern sense calls on the state to guarantee that everyone is supplied with a certain level of material means. Samuel Fleischacker argues that guaranteeing aid to the poor is a modern idea, developed only in the last two centuries.

Earlier notions of justice, including Aristotle's, were concerned with the distribution of political office, not of property. It was only in the eighteenth century, in the work of philosophers such as Adam Smith and Immanuel Kant, that justice began to be applied to the problem of poverty. To attribute a longer pedigree to distributive justice is to fail to distinguish between justice and charity.

Fleischacker explains how confusing these principles has created misconceptions about the historical development of the welfare state. Socialists, for instance, often claim that modern economics obliterated ancient ideals of equality and social justice. Free-market promoters agree but applaud the apparent triumph of skepticism and social-scientific rigor. Both interpretations overlook the gradual changes in thinking that yielded our current assumption that justice calls for everyone, if possible, to be lifted out of poverty. By examining major writings in ancient, medieval, and modern political philosophy, Fleischacker shows how we arrived at the contemporary meaning of distributive justice.

Synopsis:

Fleischacker argues that guaranteeing aid to the poor is a modern idea, developed only in the last two centuries. To attribute a longer pedigree to distributive justice is to fail to distinguish between justice and charity. By examining major writings in ancient, medieval, and modern political philosophy, Fleischacker shows how we arrived at the contemporary meaning of distributive justice.

Synopsis:

A Choice Outstanding Academic Title of 2005

About the Author

Samuel Fleischackeris Professor of Philosophy, <>University of Illinois, Chicago.

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments

Abbreviations

Introduction

1. From Aristotle to Adam Smith

1. Two Kinds of Justice

2. The Right of Necessity

3. Property Rights

4. Communal Experiments and Utopian Writings

5. Poor Laws

2. The Eighteenth Century

1. Citizen Equality: Rousseau

2. Changing Our Picture of the Poor: Smith

3. The Equal Worth of Human Beings: Kant

4. To the Vendôme Palais de Justice: Babeuf

3. From Babeuf to Rawls

1. Reaction

2. Positivists

3. Marx

4. Utilitarians

5. Rawls

6. After Rawls

Epilogue

Notes

Bibliography

Index

Product Details

ISBN:
9780674018310
Publisher:
Harvard University Press
Location:
Cambridge, Massachusetts
Author:
Fleischacker, Samuel
Subject:
Political
Subject:
History & Theory
Subject:
History & Theory - General
Subject:
Politics - General
Subject:
PHILOSOPHY / Political
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Publication Date:
September 2005
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
none
Pages:
204
Dimensions:
9 x 6 x 11 mm

Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Politics » General
Humanities » Philosophy » General

A Short History of Distributive Justice
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Product details 204 pages Harvard University Press - English 9780674018310 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , Fleischacker argues that guaranteeing aid to the poor is a modern idea, developed only in the last two centuries. To attribute a longer pedigree to distributive justice is to fail to distinguish between justice and charity. By examining major writings in ancient, medieval, and modern political philosophy, Fleischacker shows how we arrived at the contemporary meaning of distributive justice.
"Synopsis" by , A Choice Outstanding Academic Title of 2005
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