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Other titles in the Politics and Society in Twentieth-Century America series:

For All These Rights: Business, Labor, and the Shaping of America's Public-Private Welfare State (Politics and Society in Twentieth Century America)

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Synopses & Reviews

Please note that used books may not include additional media (study guides, CDs, DVDs, solutions manuals, etc.) as described in the publisher comments.

Publisher Comments:

"For All These Rights, meticulous in its historical research and forthright in its policy conclusions, is of compelling importance to all who want a richer understanding of the role of social insurance in our society. Utilizing a developmental perspective, Jennifer Klein adds to the body of provocative scholarship that explores the relationships and tensions between private and public social and health security programs. She has much to say to historians, political scientists, economists, and policy analysts, for in explaining the past she enriches our understanding of the present and prepares us for the debates that will determine the further evolution of America's private-public welfare state."--Rashi Fein, Ph.D., Professor of the Economics of Medicine, Emeritus, Harvard Medical School

"Jennifer Klein's splendid and deeply researched history of America's vast private welfare state contains many important messages for the present. Business increased its commitment to social welfare when government programs expanded. Private, not public, benefits have proved inefficient, inflationary, and unreliable. Business enterprises do not offer a stable, long-term foundation for benefits. And it is hard to hold them accountable. This is an essential book for the debate over the redefinition of the welfare state in this post-Enron age."--Michael B. Katz, Walter H. Annenberg Professor of History, University of Pennsylvania

"A brilliant and authoritative account of how today's crisis in social and economic security came to be. In a breathtakingly original journey into the heart of America's private health, welfare, and pension programs, Klein shows that the critical choices were not just about whether we had a public or a private welfare system but what the nature of those systems would be."--Dorothy Sue Cobble, Professor of Labor Studies, Rutgers University

"A dazzling excavation of the American welfare state. Jennifer Klein offers us a grand tour--labor and industry, politics and business, solidarity and anomie, feminism and paternalism, pensions and insurance, politics and culture. The result is a formidable account of the rise and fall of economic security in the United States."--James Morone, author of Hellfire Nation and The Democratic Wish

"This is a wonderful book. Well-written, it combines fresh research (especially in insurance industry archives) with a careful and sensible synthesis of the existing literature on social provision through the years under consideration. For All These Rights will undoubtedly occupy the center of the emerging debate about America's peculiar 'public/private welfare state.'"--Colin Gordon, University of Iowa, author of Dead on Arrival

Synopsis:

"For All These Rights, meticulous in its historical research and forthright in its policy conclusions, is of compelling importance to all who want a richer understanding of the role of social insurance in our society. Utilizing a developmental perspective, Jennifer Klein adds to the body of provocative scholarship that explores the relationships and tensions between private and public social and health security programs. She has much to say to historians, political scientists, economists, and policy analysts, for in explaining the past she enriches our understanding of the present and prepares us for the debates that will determine the further evolution of America's private-public welfare state."--Rashi Fein, Ph.D., Professor of the Economics of Medicine, Emeritus, Harvard Medical School

"Jennifer Klein's splendid and deeply researched history of America's vast private welfare state contains many important messages for the present. Business increased its commitment to social welfare when government programs expanded. Private, not public, benefits have proved inefficient, inflationary, and unreliable. Business enterprises do not offer a stable, long-term foundation for benefits. And it is hard to hold them accountable. This is an essential book for the debate over the redefinition of the welfare state in this post-Enron age."--Michael B. Katz, Walter H. Annenberg Professor of History, University of Pennsylvania

"A brilliant and authoritative account of how today's crisis in social and economic security came to be. In a breathtakingly original journey into the heart of America's private health, welfare, and pension programs, Klein shows that the critical choices were not just about whether we had a public or a private welfare system but what the nature of those systems would be."--Dorothy Sue Cobble, Professor of Labor Studies, Rutgers University

"A dazzling excavation of the American welfare state. Jennifer Klein offers us a grand tour--labor and industry, politics and business, solidarity and anomie, feminism and paternalism, pensions and insurance, politics and culture. The result is a formidable account of the rise and fall of economic security in the United States."--James Morone, author of Hellfire Nation and The Democratic Wish

"This is a wonderful book. Well-written, it combines fresh research (especially in insurance industry archives) with a careful and sensible synthesis of the existing literature on social provision through the years under consideration. For All These Rights will undoubtedly occupy the center of the emerging debate about America's peculiar 'public/private welfare state.'"--Colin Gordon, University of Iowa, author of Dead on Arrival

Synopsis:

The New Deal placed security at the center of American political and economic life by establishing an explicit partnership between the state, economy, and citizens. In America, unlike anywhere else in the world, most people depend overwhelmingly on private health insurance and employee benefits. The astounding rise of this phenomenon from before World War II, however, has been largely overlooked. In this powerful history of the American reliance on employment-based benefits, Jennifer Klein examines the interwoven politics of social provision and labor relations from the 1910s to the 1960s. Through a narrative that connects the commercial life insurance industry, the politics of Social Security, organized labor's quest for economic security, and the evolution of modern health insurance, she shows how the firm-centered welfare system emerged. Moreover, the imperatives of industrial relations, Klein argues, shaped public and private social security.

Looking closely at unions and communities, Klein uncovers the wide range of alternative, community-based health plans that had begun to germinate in the 1930s and 1940s but that eventually succumbed to commercial health insurance and pensions. She also illuminates the contests to define "security"--job security, health security, and old age security--following World War II.

For All These Rights traces the fate of the New Deal emphasis on social entitlement as the private sector competed with and emulated Roosevelt's Social Security program. Through the story of struggles over health security and old age security, social rights and the welfare state, it traces the fate of New Deal liberalism--as a set of ideas about the state, security, and labor rights--in the 1950s, the 1960s, and beyond.

About the Author

Jennifer Klein is Assistant Professor of History, at Yale University.

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments ix

List of Abbreviations xiii

Introduction 1

Chapter 1: Mass Marketing Private Insurance: The Origins of a Private Employee Benefits System, 1910-1933 16

Chapter 2: Industrial Pensions: Efficiency and Security 53

Chapter 3: The New Deal Struggle: Insurers, Employers, and the Politics of Social Security, 1933-1940 78

Chapter 4: Organizing for Health Security: Community, Labor, and New Deal Visions for Health Care and Health Policy, 1930s-1940s 116

Chapter 5: Economic Security on the Home Front: Health Insurance and Pensions during World War II 162

Chapter 6: Managing Security: The Triumph of Group Insurance and the State’s Legitimation of the Public-Private Welfare State,

1940-1960 204

Chapter 7: Epilogue: The Limits of Private Security, 1960s-1990s 258

Notes 277

Index 341

Product Details

ISBN:
9780691126050
Author:
Klein, Jennifer
Publisher:
Princeton University Press
Location:
Princeton
Subject:
Insurance - General
Subject:
Public Policy - Economic Policy
Subject:
Public Policy - Social Services & Welfare
Subject:
Public Policy - Social Security
Subject:
United States - 20th Century
Subject:
American history
Subject:
Sociology
Subject:
Politics - General
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Series:
Politics and Society in Twentieth Century America
Publication Date:
February 2006
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
College/higher education:
Language:
English
Illustrations:
10 halftones. 1 line illus.
Pages:
392
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in 19 oz

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Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Politics » General
History and Social Science » Politics » United States » Politics
History and Social Science » Sociology » Children and Family
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For All These Rights: Business, Labor, and the Shaping of America's Public-Private Welfare State (Politics and Society in Twentieth Century America) Used Trade Paper
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$25.00 In Stock
Product details 392 pages Princeton University Press - English 9780691126050 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , "For All These Rights, meticulous in its historical research and forthright in its policy conclusions, is of compelling importance to all who want a richer understanding of the role of social insurance in our society. Utilizing a developmental perspective, Jennifer Klein adds to the body of provocative scholarship that explores the relationships and tensions between private and public social and health security programs. She has much to say to historians, political scientists, economists, and policy analysts, for in explaining the past she enriches our understanding of the present and prepares us for the debates that will determine the further evolution of America's private-public welfare state."--Rashi Fein, Ph.D., Professor of the Economics of Medicine, Emeritus, Harvard Medical School

"Jennifer Klein's splendid and deeply researched history of America's vast private welfare state contains many important messages for the present. Business increased its commitment to social welfare when government programs expanded. Private, not public, benefits have proved inefficient, inflationary, and unreliable. Business enterprises do not offer a stable, long-term foundation for benefits. And it is hard to hold them accountable. This is an essential book for the debate over the redefinition of the welfare state in this post-Enron age."--Michael B. Katz, Walter H. Annenberg Professor of History, University of Pennsylvania

"A brilliant and authoritative account of how today's crisis in social and economic security came to be. In a breathtakingly original journey into the heart of America's private health, welfare, and pension programs, Klein shows that the critical choices were not just about whether we had a public or a private welfare system but what the nature of those systems would be."--Dorothy Sue Cobble, Professor of Labor Studies, Rutgers University

"A dazzling excavation of the American welfare state. Jennifer Klein offers us a grand tour--labor and industry, politics and business, solidarity and anomie, feminism and paternalism, pensions and insurance, politics and culture. The result is a formidable account of the rise and fall of economic security in the United States."--James Morone, author of Hellfire Nation and The Democratic Wish

"This is a wonderful book. Well-written, it combines fresh research (especially in insurance industry archives) with a careful and sensible synthesis of the existing literature on social provision through the years under consideration. For All These Rights will undoubtedly occupy the center of the emerging debate about America's peculiar 'public/private welfare state.'"--Colin Gordon, University of Iowa, author of Dead on Arrival

"Synopsis" by , The New Deal placed security at the center of American political and economic life by establishing an explicit partnership between the state, economy, and citizens. In America, unlike anywhere else in the world, most people depend overwhelmingly on private health insurance and employee benefits. The astounding rise of this phenomenon from before World War II, however, has been largely overlooked. In this powerful history of the American reliance on employment-based benefits, Jennifer Klein examines the interwoven politics of social provision and labor relations from the 1910s to the 1960s. Through a narrative that connects the commercial life insurance industry, the politics of Social Security, organized labor's quest for economic security, and the evolution of modern health insurance, she shows how the firm-centered welfare system emerged. Moreover, the imperatives of industrial relations, Klein argues, shaped public and private social security.

Looking closely at unions and communities, Klein uncovers the wide range of alternative, community-based health plans that had begun to germinate in the 1930s and 1940s but that eventually succumbed to commercial health insurance and pensions. She also illuminates the contests to define "security"--job security, health security, and old age security--following World War II.

For All These Rights traces the fate of the New Deal emphasis on social entitlement as the private sector competed with and emulated Roosevelt's Social Security program. Through the story of struggles over health security and old age security, social rights and the welfare state, it traces the fate of New Deal liberalism--as a set of ideas about the state, security, and labor rights--in the 1950s, the 1960s, and beyond.

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