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1 Local Warehouse Literature- A to Z

A Girl Becomes a Comma Like That

by

A Girl Becomes a Comma Like That Cover

ISBN13: 9780743257763
ISBN10: 0743257766
Condition: Standard
All Product Details

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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Rachel Spark is an irreverent, sexually eager, financially unstable thirty-year-old college instructor who moves back home when her mother is diagnosed with terminal breast cancer. As she tries to ease her mother, a perpetually cheerful woman, toward the inevitable, Rachel turns from one man to the next — sometimes comically, sometimes catastrophically — as if her own survival depended upon it.

Ella Bloom, an adult student in Rachel's poetry class, has aspirations beyond her work at a local family planning clinic. But she spends her nights wondering why her husband kissed one of her colleagues and whether it will lead to a full-fledged affair. She is also preoccupied with one of her repeat patients, Georgia, a teenager whose frequent clinic visits speak volumes. What they all have in common is their desire for love, despite its many obstacles.

A Girl Becomes a Comma Like That is a novel rife with wit and compassion. A provocative, assured new voice in literary fiction, Lisa Glatt eyes the yardsticks by which we constantly measure our world and ourselves — devotion, lust, forgiveness, and courage.

Review:

"A girl becomes a comma Llike that, with wrong boy after wrong boy," muses the narrator of Glatt's keenly observed debut. "She becomes a pause, something quick before the real thing." Rachel Spark, a 30-ish university poetry teacher, is looking for the real thing — but she's also living in L.A with her mother, "because she was sick and because I was poor.... It was love, yes, but need was part of it too." As her mother slowly succumbs to breast cancer, Rachel seeks solace — and escape — in the arms of various unsuitable men. Glatt's tone shifts through comic, pensive and mournful as she also explores the lives of Rachel's newlywed student, Ella Bloom; her lovelorn, allergy-challenged best friend, Angela Burrows; and Georgia Carter, a promiscuous 16-year-old patient at the health clinic where Ella works and where Rachel later seeks an abortion. Repeated references to breasts, limbs and organs in discomfort and disease foreground these women's uneasy relationships with their bodies and their lives; drunken and sorrowful sex abounds; connections with men are made and then broken. Rachel loves her mother, but disapproves of her shedding her wig, ordering a vibrator and falling in love in the face of death. As the dying woman — Glatt's liveliest character — evicts Rachel from her hospital room, readers may sympathize: much earlier, mother has diagnosed daughter, "You're thirty. Of course you need connection." Glatt's clear-eyed rendering of the complexities of relationships between friends and family enriches a story in which the steps toward healing are small and tentative, but moving nevertheless." Publishers Weekly Review Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.--This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

Review:

"Lisa Glatt's novel is razor sharp and exceedingly funny. Reading it is sort of like acupuncture for the sexual organs — thrilling and very very dangerous." Frederick Barthelme, author of Elroy Nights

Review:

"Glatt makes a valiant try to parse the reasons for her characters' behaving foolishly, but she doesn't come up with much more than the usual mental anguish of troubled love and misdirected lives....Heartfelt but poorly built." Kirkus Reviews

Review:

"A Girl Becomes a Comma Like That is about everything that matters: love, lust, death, failure, the wish to stay in place, the ability to let go, the abiding connection between mothers and daughters. It is written with sly humor and a tender heart. This is a first novel that feels both rueful and hopeful and suggests that its author might be as endearing as she is smart." Daphne Merkin, author of Dreaming of Hitler

Review:

"Glatt had me at the title. And A Girl Becomes a Comma Like That only gets more impressive from there. A brilliant debut." Dany Levy, DailyCandy.com

Review:

"Lisa Glatt's novel, with its brilliant array of female characters, does the near-impossible — it says something true about all women. This is the most honest book I've ever read about the complex relationship between women and their own bodies — how they use them, and how they are betrayed by them." Susan Perabo, author of The Broken Places

Review:

"It's a credit to Glatt's ability to strip away romantic notions of sex to explore how we use it for control and escape." Boston Herald

Review:

"Glatt balances so much so masterfully; it's a powerful debut." San Diego Union-Tribune

Review:

"Like one-night stands, her chapters don't necessarily lead anywhere. Still, the novel in stories has some disadvantages. By not connecting the dots, Glatt can't fully explore the connections among all these characters." New York Times

Review:

"Sad, yes, but also comic, even bawdy." Washington Post

Review:

"Razor sharp and exceedingly funny. A heartfelt and troubling book about how things go wrong, time after time, and how we manage in spite of it." Frederick Barthelme, author of The Law of Averages: New and Selected Stories

Synopsis:

Razor sharp and hauntingly observant, this poignant debut novel delves into the intricacies of mother-daughter relationships and offers an unflinchingly modern look at love, frailty, escapism, and death.

About the Author

Lisa Glatt was the winner of the 2002 Mississippi Review Prize for fiction. Her work has appeared in various publications, including Columbia, Other Voices, Indiana Review, and Swink. She lives in Long Beach, California, with her husband, the poet David Hernandez. Visit her website at www.lisaglatt.com.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

Jennifer Kulman, July 8, 2007 (view all comments by Jennifer Kulman)
Very sharply written. This tells the story from the viewpoint of several women - and what is wrong with their lives. I can't put my finger on exactly what it is I liked so much about this book, but I really liked it. Maybe not a book for men though, as it's really written from a woman's thoughts.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(16 of 33 readers found this comment helpful)

Product Details

ISBN:
9780743257763
Author:
Glatt, Lisa
Publisher:
Simon & Schuster
Author:
att
Author:
Lisa Gl
Subject:
Literary
Subject:
General Fiction
Subject:
Literature-A to Z
Copyright:
Edition Description:
B102
Publication Date:
May 2005
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
304
Dimensions:
8.44 x 5.5 in 10.22 oz

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Related Subjects

Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z

A Girl Becomes a Comma Like That Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$1.48 In Stock
Product details 304 pages Simon & Schuster - English 9780743257763 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "A girl becomes a comma Llike that, with wrong boy after wrong boy," muses the narrator of Glatt's keenly observed debut. "She becomes a pause, something quick before the real thing." Rachel Spark, a 30-ish university poetry teacher, is looking for the real thing — but she's also living in L.A with her mother, "because she was sick and because I was poor.... It was love, yes, but need was part of it too." As her mother slowly succumbs to breast cancer, Rachel seeks solace — and escape — in the arms of various unsuitable men. Glatt's tone shifts through comic, pensive and mournful as she also explores the lives of Rachel's newlywed student, Ella Bloom; her lovelorn, allergy-challenged best friend, Angela Burrows; and Georgia Carter, a promiscuous 16-year-old patient at the health clinic where Ella works and where Rachel later seeks an abortion. Repeated references to breasts, limbs and organs in discomfort and disease foreground these women's uneasy relationships with their bodies and their lives; drunken and sorrowful sex abounds; connections with men are made and then broken. Rachel loves her mother, but disapproves of her shedding her wig, ordering a vibrator and falling in love in the face of death. As the dying woman — Glatt's liveliest character — evicts Rachel from her hospital room, readers may sympathize: much earlier, mother has diagnosed daughter, "You're thirty. Of course you need connection." Glatt's clear-eyed rendering of the complexities of relationships between friends and family enriches a story in which the steps toward healing are small and tentative, but moving nevertheless." Publishers Weekly Review Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.--This text refers to the Hardcover edition.
"Review" by , "Lisa Glatt's novel is razor sharp and exceedingly funny. Reading it is sort of like acupuncture for the sexual organs — thrilling and very very dangerous."
"Review" by , "Glatt makes a valiant try to parse the reasons for her characters' behaving foolishly, but she doesn't come up with much more than the usual mental anguish of troubled love and misdirected lives....Heartfelt but poorly built."
"Review" by , "A Girl Becomes a Comma Like That is about everything that matters: love, lust, death, failure, the wish to stay in place, the ability to let go, the abiding connection between mothers and daughters. It is written with sly humor and a tender heart. This is a first novel that feels both rueful and hopeful and suggests that its author might be as endearing as she is smart."
"Review" by , "Glatt had me at the title. And A Girl Becomes a Comma Like That only gets more impressive from there. A brilliant debut."
"Review" by , "Lisa Glatt's novel, with its brilliant array of female characters, does the near-impossible — it says something true about all women. This is the most honest book I've ever read about the complex relationship between women and their own bodies — how they use them, and how they are betrayed by them."
"Review" by , "It's a credit to Glatt's ability to strip away romantic notions of sex to explore how we use it for control and escape."
"Review" by , "Glatt balances so much so masterfully; it's a powerful debut."
"Review" by , "Like one-night stands, her chapters don't necessarily lead anywhere. Still, the novel in stories has some disadvantages. By not connecting the dots, Glatt can't fully explore the connections among all these characters."
"Review" by , "Sad, yes, but also comic, even bawdy."
"Review" by , "Razor sharp and exceedingly funny. A heartfelt and troubling book about how things go wrong, time after time, and how we manage in spite of it."
"Synopsis" by , Razor sharp and hauntingly observant, this poignant debut novel delves into the intricacies of mother-daughter relationships and offers an unflinchingly modern look at love, frailty, escapism, and death.
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