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Peace Kills: America's Fun New Imperialism

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Peace Kills: America's Fun New Imperialism Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Please note that used books may not include additional media (study guides, CDs, DVDs, solutions manuals, etc.) as described in the publisher comments.

Publisher Comments:

As the Los Angeles Times has hailed, "when it comes to scouting the world for world-class absurdities, P.J. O'Rourke is the right man for the job." In his classic best-sellers, O'Rourke has reported from the front lines of world history, braving the bad traffic, weak drinks, and less than stellar golfing of countless hot spots of war, poverty, and repression. Now with his latest collection, Peace Kills, P.J. casts his ever-shrewd and mordant eye on America's latest adventures in warfare. Imperialism has never been more fun.

To unravel the mysteries of war, O'Rourke first visits Kosovo to find out what happens when we try to have one without hurting anybody: "Wherever there's injustice, oppression, and suffering, America will show up six months later and bomb the country next to where it's happening." He travels to Israel at the outbreak of the intifada. He flies to Egypt in the wake of the 9/11 terrorists' attacks and contemplates bygone lunacies. "Why are the people in the Middle East so crazy? Here, at the pyramids, was an answer from the earliest days of civilization: People have always been crazy." He covers the demonstrations and the denunciations of war. "French ideas, French beliefs, and French actions form a sort of lodestone for humanity. A moral compass needle needs a butt end. Wherever direction France is pointing — toward collaboration with Nazis, accommodation with communists, existentialism, Jerry Lewis, or a UN resolution veto — we can go the other way with a quiet conscience." Finally he arrives in Baghdad with the U.S. Army and, standing in one of Saddam's palaces, decides, "If a reason for invading Iraq was needed, felony interior decorating would have sufficed."

Peace Kills is P.J. O'Rourke as both incisive reporter and absurdist, relevant and irreverent, with a clear eye for everyone's confusion, including his own. O'Rourke understands that peace is sometimes one of the most troubling aspects of war.

Review:

"O'Rourke has made a career out of telling people off. As a foreign correspondent for the Atlantic Monthly and Rolling Stone, he has demonstrated a flair for sarcasm and an aptitude for making people laugh. In his 11th book, however, this provocateur par excellence presents a more sober and, alas, less funny, take than usual, this time in essays on American foreign policy, including visits to several important countries on the international scene. Starting with Kosovo, he comments on the Serbian-Albanian conflict, then makes his way to Israel, Egypt, Kuwait and Iraq. Other entries look at the effects of September 11 on the U.S. home front, which includes poking fun at airport search techniques and a clever deconstruction of a 2001 statement on peace and social justice signed by 103 Nobelists. O'Rourke's book does many of the things a conservative bestseller is supposed to do: it's irreverent, in-your-face and often offensive (Hillary Clinton: 'the furious harridan on the White House third floor'). Yet O'Rourke, the funny man of foreign politics, seems less interested in humor here than in slightly skewed reporting. His articles on Israel and Egypt, for example, are basically descriptive, a diary account of where he went, what he saw, the hotels he stayed in, the food he ate, interrupted every so often by O'Rourke's trademark non sequitur humor. The author's fans probably won't mind the slight shift in direction, though they will wish for more laughs; O'Rourke is one of the most popular conservative authors around and this book, like his others, should find a happy nest on national bestseller lists." Publishers Weekly (Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"Peace Kills will circulate best where readers are already committed to the I-hate-liberals humor of O'Rourke and his ideological brethren." Booklist

Review:

"The senior satirist of the right returns to dissect foreign policy and — Lord help us — he seems to have moments of distinct sanity....[H]is backgrounder journalism is first-rate...his color reportage is smartly selective and funny." Kirkus Reviews

Review:

"Peace Kills is war coverage in the great tradition of Catch 22 and M*A*S*H: Wars can be right or wrong, but they are always crazy and frightening in the center and might be uproarious around the edge....P.J. O'Rourke [is] one of America's funniest serious commentators....His eye is sharp and his smirk is fixed firmly in place." John Gibson, The New York Post

Review:

"Readers acquainted with P.J. O'Rourke?s knock-'em-dead writings on American politics will know just what to expect....O'Rourke is refreshing [and] never fails to find the absurd." Paula Friedman, The New York Times Book Review

Review:

"O'Rourke cut his teeth writing brilliantly caustic dispatches from the most war-torn parts of the world. He's in peak form with these pieces detailing America's seemingly insane foreign policy and offering a grunt's eye view of the mess in Iraq." Maxim

Review:

"O'Rourke is an actual conservative, with ideas and a conscience, as opposed to the stealth flacks staying on party message that often pass for conservatives in these Hannitized and Limbaughtomized days." Zay N. Smith, Chicago Sun-Times

Review:

"We are fortunate to have an erudite companion with a heavily stamped passport, a guy who can read and digest the wonkiest policy paper and still knows a good punchline when he sees one." Patrick Beach, Austin American-Statesman

Synopsis:

O'Rourke casts his ever-shrewd and mordant eye on America's latest adventures in warfare. He is both incisive reporter and absurdist, relevant and irreverent, with a clear eye for everyone's confusion, including his own. O'Rourke understands that peace is sometimes one of the most troubling aspects of war.

Synopsis:

Having unraveled the mysteries of Washington in his classic best-seller Parliament of Whores and the mysteries of economics in Eat the Rich, one of our shrewdest and most mordant foreign correspondents now turns his attention to what is these days the ultimate mystery — America's foreign policy.

Although he has written about foreigners and foreign affairs for years, P.J. O'Rourke has, like most Americans, never really thought about foreign policy. Just as a dog owner doesn't have a "dog policy," says P.J., "we feed foreigners, take care of them, give them treats, and when absolutely necessary, whack them with a rolled up newspaper." But in Peace Kills, P.J. finally sets out to make sense of America's "Great Game" (no, not the slot machines in Vegas). He visits countries on the brink of conflict, in the grips of it, and still reeling from it, starting with Kosovo, where he discovers that "whenever there's injustice, oppression, and suffering, America will show up six months late and bomb the country next to where it's happening." From there, it's on to Egypt, Israel, Kuwait, Afghanistan, and Iraq, where P.J. witnesses both the start and finish of hostilities. P.J. also examines the effect of war and peace on the home front — from the absurd hassles of airport security to the hideous specter of anthrax (luckily the only threats in his mail are from credit card companies).

Peace Kills is P.J. O'Rourke at his most incisive and relevant — an eye-opening look at a world much changed since he declared in his number-one national best-seller Give War a Chance that the most troubling aspect of war is sometimes peace itself.

Synopsis:

With his latest national best seller, Peace Kills, P.J. O'Rourke casts his ever-shrewd and mordant eye on America's latest adventures in warfare. Imperialism has never been more fun.

To unravel the mysteries of war, O'Rourke first visits Kosovo: "Wherever there's injustice, oppression, and suffering, America will show up six months later and bomb the country next to where it's happening." He travels to Israel at the outbreak of the intifada. He flies to Egypt in the wake of the 9/11 terrorists' attacks and contemplates bygone lunacies. "Why are the people in the Middle East so crazy? Here, at the pyramids, was an answer from the earliest days of civilization: People have always been crazy." He covers the demonstrations and the denunciations of war. "A moral compass needle needs a butt end. Wherever direction France is pointing-toward collaboration with Nazis, accommodation with communists, existentialism, Jerry Lewis, or a UN resolution veto-we can go the other way with a quiet conscience." Finally he arrives in Baghdad with the U.S. Army and, standing in one of Saddam's palaces, decides, "If a reason for invading Iraq was needed, felony interior decorating would have sufficed."

Product Details

ISBN:
9780802141989
Author:
O'Rourke, P. J.
Publisher:
Grove Press
Author:
O'Rourke, P. J.
Subject:
Political
Subject:
Essays
Subject:
Topic - Political
Subject:
International Relations - General
Subject:
Government - U.S. Government
Subject:
HUMOR / Topic/Political
Subject:
Politics-Political Science
Edition Description:
First Trade Paper Edition
Publication Date:
20050431
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Language:
English
Pages:
224
Dimensions:
900x600

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Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Humor » General
Arts and Entertainment » Humor » Narrative
Arts and Entertainment » Humor » Political
History and Social Science » Journalism » Journalists
History and Social Science » Politics » General
History and Social Science » Politics » Political Science
History and Social Science » Politics » United States » Foreign Policy
History and Social Science » World History » General

Peace Kills: America's Fun New Imperialism Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$8.00 In Stock
Product details 224 pages Grove Press - English 9780802141989 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "O'Rourke has made a career out of telling people off. As a foreign correspondent for the Atlantic Monthly and Rolling Stone, he has demonstrated a flair for sarcasm and an aptitude for making people laugh. In his 11th book, however, this provocateur par excellence presents a more sober and, alas, less funny, take than usual, this time in essays on American foreign policy, including visits to several important countries on the international scene. Starting with Kosovo, he comments on the Serbian-Albanian conflict, then makes his way to Israel, Egypt, Kuwait and Iraq. Other entries look at the effects of September 11 on the U.S. home front, which includes poking fun at airport search techniques and a clever deconstruction of a 2001 statement on peace and social justice signed by 103 Nobelists. O'Rourke's book does many of the things a conservative bestseller is supposed to do: it's irreverent, in-your-face and often offensive (Hillary Clinton: 'the furious harridan on the White House third floor'). Yet O'Rourke, the funny man of foreign politics, seems less interested in humor here than in slightly skewed reporting. His articles on Israel and Egypt, for example, are basically descriptive, a diary account of where he went, what he saw, the hotels he stayed in, the food he ate, interrupted every so often by O'Rourke's trademark non sequitur humor. The author's fans probably won't mind the slight shift in direction, though they will wish for more laughs; O'Rourke is one of the most popular conservative authors around and this book, like his others, should find a happy nest on national bestseller lists." Publishers Weekly (Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review" by , "Peace Kills will circulate best where readers are already committed to the I-hate-liberals humor of O'Rourke and his ideological brethren."
"Review" by , "The senior satirist of the right returns to dissect foreign policy and — Lord help us — he seems to have moments of distinct sanity....[H]is backgrounder journalism is first-rate...his color reportage is smartly selective and funny."
"Review" by , "Peace Kills is war coverage in the great tradition of Catch 22 and M*A*S*H: Wars can be right or wrong, but they are always crazy and frightening in the center and might be uproarious around the edge....P.J. O'Rourke [is] one of America's funniest serious commentators....His eye is sharp and his smirk is fixed firmly in place."
"Review" by , "Readers acquainted with P.J. O'Rourke?s knock-'em-dead writings on American politics will know just what to expect....O'Rourke is refreshing [and] never fails to find the absurd."
"Review" by , "O'Rourke cut his teeth writing brilliantly caustic dispatches from the most war-torn parts of the world. He's in peak form with these pieces detailing America's seemingly insane foreign policy and offering a grunt's eye view of the mess in Iraq."
"Review" by , "O'Rourke is an actual conservative, with ideas and a conscience, as opposed to the stealth flacks staying on party message that often pass for conservatives in these Hannitized and Limbaughtomized days."
"Review" by , "We are fortunate to have an erudite companion with a heavily stamped passport, a guy who can read and digest the wonkiest policy paper and still knows a good punchline when he sees one."
"Synopsis" by , O'Rourke casts his ever-shrewd and mordant eye on America's latest adventures in warfare. He is both incisive reporter and absurdist, relevant and irreverent, with a clear eye for everyone's confusion, including his own. O'Rourke understands that peace is sometimes one of the most troubling aspects of war.
"Synopsis" by , Having unraveled the mysteries of Washington in his classic best-seller Parliament of Whores and the mysteries of economics in Eat the Rich, one of our shrewdest and most mordant foreign correspondents now turns his attention to what is these days the ultimate mystery — America's foreign policy.

Although he has written about foreigners and foreign affairs for years, P.J. O'Rourke has, like most Americans, never really thought about foreign policy. Just as a dog owner doesn't have a "dog policy," says P.J., "we feed foreigners, take care of them, give them treats, and when absolutely necessary, whack them with a rolled up newspaper." But in Peace Kills, P.J. finally sets out to make sense of America's "Great Game" (no, not the slot machines in Vegas). He visits countries on the brink of conflict, in the grips of it, and still reeling from it, starting with Kosovo, where he discovers that "whenever there's injustice, oppression, and suffering, America will show up six months late and bomb the country next to where it's happening." From there, it's on to Egypt, Israel, Kuwait, Afghanistan, and Iraq, where P.J. witnesses both the start and finish of hostilities. P.J. also examines the effect of war and peace on the home front — from the absurd hassles of airport security to the hideous specter of anthrax (luckily the only threats in his mail are from credit card companies).

Peace Kills is P.J. O'Rourke at his most incisive and relevant — an eye-opening look at a world much changed since he declared in his number-one national best-seller Give War a Chance that the most troubling aspect of war is sometimes peace itself.

"Synopsis" by ,
With his latest national best seller, Peace Kills, P.J. O'Rourke casts his ever-shrewd and mordant eye on America's latest adventures in warfare. Imperialism has never been more fun.

To unravel the mysteries of war, O'Rourke first visits Kosovo: "Wherever there's injustice, oppression, and suffering, America will show up six months later and bomb the country next to where it's happening." He travels to Israel at the outbreak of the intifada. He flies to Egypt in the wake of the 9/11 terrorists' attacks and contemplates bygone lunacies. "Why are the people in the Middle East so crazy? Here, at the pyramids, was an answer from the earliest days of civilization: People have always been crazy." He covers the demonstrations and the denunciations of war. "A moral compass needle needs a butt end. Wherever direction France is pointing-toward collaboration with Nazis, accommodation with communists, existentialism, Jerry Lewis, or a UN resolution veto-we can go the other way with a quiet conscience." Finally he arrives in Baghdad with the U.S. Army and, standing in one of Saddam's palaces, decides, "If a reason for invading Iraq was needed, felony interior decorating would have sufficed."

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