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1 Beaverton Psychology- Mind and Consciousness

This title in other editions

On Intelligence

by

On Intelligence Cover

 

 

Excerpt

From On Intelligence:

Let me show why computing is not intelligence. Consider the task of catching a ball. Someone throws a ball to you, you see it traveling towards you, and in less than a second you snatch it out of the air. This doesn't seem too difficult-until you try to program a robot arm to do the same. As many a graduate student has found out the hard way, it seems nearly impossible. When engineers or computer scientists try to solve this problem, they first try to calculate the flight of the ball to determine where it will be when it reaches the arm. This calculation requires solving a set of equations of the type you learn in high school physics. Next, all the joints of a robotic arm have to be adjusted in concert to move the hand into the proper position. This whole operation has to be repeated multiple times, for as the ball approaches, the robot gets better information about its location and trajectory. If the robot waits to start moving until it knows exactly where the ball will land it will be too late to catch it. A computer requires millions of steps to solve the numerous mathematical equations to catch the ball. And although it's imaginable that a computer might be programmed to successfully solve this problem, the brain solves it in a different, faster, more intelligent way.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780805078534
With:
Blakeslee, Sandra
Publisher:
Owl Books (NY)
With:
Blakeslee, Sandra
Author:
Blakeslee, Sandra
Author:
Baker, Stephen
Author:
Hawkins, Jeff
Subject:
General
Subject:
General science
Subject:
Cognitive Psychology
Subject:
Intellect
Subject:
Neural networks (computer science)
Subject:
Artificial Intelligence - General
Subject:
Intelligence (AI) & Semantics
Subject:
Brain
Subject:
Artificial Intelligence
Subject:
Computers-Reference - General
Subject:
Molecular Physics
Subject:
Life Sciences - Neuroscience
Subject:
General Technology
Subject:
Jeopardy!;Watson;IBM;Ken Jennings;Brad Rutter;artificial intelligence;computers;
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Cloth
Publication Date:
20050831
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Includes 12 black-and-white photographs
Pages:
288
Dimensions:
8.31 x 5.71 x 0.78 in

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Related Subjects

Computers and Internet » Artificial Intelligence » General
Computers and Internet » Computers Reference » General
Health and Self-Help » Psychology » Cognitive Science
Health and Self-Help » Psychology » Mind and Consciousness
Reference » Science Reference » General
Science and Mathematics » Physics » General

On Intelligence Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$7.50 In Stock
Product details 288 pages Owl Books (NY) - English 9780805078534 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , The thrilling history and behind-the-scenes story of Watson, the computer created by IBM scientists to take on two masters of Jeopardy!, Ken Jennings and Brad Rutter, in a fast-paced look at how smart machines will change our world.
"Synopsis" by , “The place to go if youre really interested in this version of the quest for creating Artificial Intelligence (AI).”—Seattle Times

For centuries, people have dreamed of creating a machine that thinks like a human. Scientists have made progress: computers can now beat chess grandmasters and help prevent terrorist attacks. Yet we still await a machine that exhibits the rich complexity of human thought—one that doesnt just crunch numbers, or take us to a relevant Web page, but understands us and gives us what we need. With the creation of Watson, IBMs Jeopardy! playing computer, we are one step closer to that goal.

But how did we get here? In Final Jeopardy, Stephen Baker traces the arc of Watsons “life,” from its birth in the IBM labs to its big night on the podium. We meet Hollywood moguls and Jeopardy! masters, genius computer programmers and ambitious scientists, including Watsons eccentric creator, David Ferrucci. We see how a new generation of Watsons could transform medicine, the law, marketing, even science itself, as machines process huge amounts of data at lightning speed, answer our questions, and possibly come up with new hypotheses. As fast and fun as the game itself, Final Jeopardy shows how smart machines will fit into our world—and how theyll disrupt it.

“Like Tracy Kidders Soul of a New Machine, Bakers book finds us at the dawn of a singularity. Its an excellent case study, and does good double duty as a Philip K. Dick scenario, too.”—Kirkus Reviews

“Bakers narrative is both charming and terrifying . . . an entertaining romp through the field of artificial intelligence—and a sobering glimpse of things to come.”—Publishers Weekly, starred review

"Synopsis" by ,
From the inventor of the PalmPilot comes a new and compelling theory of intelligence, brain function, and the future of intelligent machines

Jeff Hawkins, the man who created the PalmPilot, Treo smart phone, and other handheld devices, has reshaped our relationship to computers. Now he stands ready to revolutionize both neuroscience and computing in one stroke, with a new understanding of intelligence itself.

Hawkins develops a powerful theory of how the human brain works, explaining why computers are not intelligent and how, based on this new theory, we can finally build intelligent machines.

The brain is not a computer, but a memory system that stores experiences in a way that reflects the true structure of the world, remembering sequences of events and their nested relationships and making predictions based on those memories. It is this memory-prediction system that forms the basis of intelligence, perception, creativity, and even consciousness.

In an engaging style that will captivate audiences from the merely curious to the professional scientist, Hawkins shows how a clear understanding of how the brain works will make it possible for us to build intelligent machines, in silicon, that will exceed our human ability in surprising ways.

Written with acclaimed science writer Sandra Blakeslee, On Intelligence promises to completely transfigure the possibilities of the technology age. It is a landmark book in its scope and clarity.

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