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Dora: A Headcase

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Dora: A Headcase Cover

ISBN13: 9780983477570
ISBN10: 0983477574
Condition: Standard
All Product Details

 

Awards

Staff Pick

This book jumps off the cliff with the first chapter but never quite crashes at the bottom. The crazy ride stayed with me weeks after reading it, and I still occasionally ask myself what the hell just happened! The author calls it a farce; it's that and a lot more. Thank you, Lidia Yuknavitch, for the meatiest, most-fun, most-challenging-to-my-sense-of-how-far-you-can-push-things book of the year.
Recommended by Doug C., Powells.com

Yuknavitch is such a literary badass. In her debut novel (following last year's fantastic memoir, The Chronology of Water), she rips Freud's classic case study to shreds, then stitches it back together as a contemporary radical/feminist/hyperactive/queer coming-of-age story. Hysterical!
Recommended by Kim, Powells.com

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

INTRODUCTION BY CHUCK PALAHNIUK

IDA NEEDS A SHRINK; or so her philandering father thinks, and he sends her to a Seattle psychiatrist. Immediately wise to the head games of her new shrink, who she nicknames Siggy and Sig, Ida begins a coming of age journey. At the beginning of her therapy Ida, who's alter-ego is Dora, and her small posse of pals, Little Teena, Ave Maria, and Obsidian, engage in what they call "art attacks" for teen fun and mayhem. Ida has a secret: she is in love with Obsidian. Whats more, the closer she gets to intimacy or the crisis of deep emotions, Ida faints or loses her voice. Ida and her friends hatch a plan to secretly record and film Siggy and Ida intends to make an experimental art film in which he figures. Sig becomes the target of her teen rage and angst, but something goes terribly wrong at a crucial moment of filming Siggy at a nearby hospital when Ida finds her father in the emergency room having suffered an acute heart attack. Ida loses her voice and experiences more trauma — a rough cut of her experimental film has gone underground viral and unethical media agents are trying to hunt her down to buy the material. A chase ensues in which everyone wants what Ida's got.

Dora: A Head Case is a contemporary coming of age story based on Freud's famous case study — retold and revamped through Dora's point of view, with shotgun blasts of dark humor and sexual play. Its a ballsy book. Some have called it the female Fight Club.

Review:

"Hold a basketball under water, take your hand away, and it'll surface with the powerhouse force of the suppressed. Welcome to Lidia Yuknavitch's world. In Dora: A Headcase, Yuknavitch reimagines the girl, the woman, at the heart of Sigmund Freud's breakthrough case study and unleashes this character's fury against a backdrop of hypocritical adulthood. Yuknavitch is talking back to a hundred years, to the founding of psychoanalysis. I'd like to think she wrote parts of this novel just for me, but so many readers will feel that way. Yuknavitch has wrestled with the force of her own convictions and given a powerful voice to a badass character born on the literary landscape." Monica Drake author of Clown Girl

Review:

"Dora is too much for Sigmund Freud but shes just right for us — raunchy, sharp and so funny it hurts." Katherine Dunn, author of Geek Love

Review:

"In these times there's no reason for a novel to exist unless it's dangerous, provocative and not like anything that's come before. Dora: A Headcase is that kind of novel. It's dirty, sexy, rude, smart, soulful, fresh and risky. Think of your favorite out-there genius writer; multiply by ten, add a big heart, a poet's ear, and a bad girl's courage, and you've got Lidia Yuknavitch." Karen Karbo, author of How Georgia Became O'Keeffe

Review:

"Dora: A Head Case is first and foremost an irreverent portrait of a smart seventeen year old trying to survive. It channels Sigmund Freud and his young patient Dora and is both a hilarious critique and an oddly touching homage. With an unerring ear and a very keen eye, Lidia Yuknavitch casts a very special slant of light on our centuries and our lives. Put simply, the book is needed." Carole Maso, author of Defiance and The Art Lover

Review:

"Snappy and fun. I can pretty much guarantee you haven't met a character quite l like Ida before." Blake Nelson, author of Girl and Paranoid Park

Review:

"In Dora, [Lidia Yuknavitch] takes the most classic model of Thera-tainment, personal-crisis-as-content, and she re-imagines it wonderfully reversed. The world of Dora is not just possible, it's inevitable. It's revenge as the ultimate therapy." From the introduction by Chuck Palahniuk, author of Damned

Review:

"Dora: A Headcase is a feminist retelling of Freud's famous case study, Dora. But the novel constantly transcends this conceit in beautiful and surprising ways....Put simply, Yuknavitch has written the best portrait of teen girlhood I have ever read. I loved this book — it's like a smart, fast chick Fight Club." Vanessa Veselka, author of Zazen

About the Author

Lidia Yuknavitch is the author of The Chronology of Water: A Memoir and three works of short fiction: Her Other Mouths, Libertys Excess, and Real to Reel, as well as a book of literary criticism, Allegories of Violence.

Her work has appeared in Ms., the Iowa Review, Exquisite Corpse, Another Chicago Magazine, Fiction International, Zyzzyva, and elsewhere. Her book Real to Reel was a finalist for the Oregon Book Award, and she is the recipient of awards and fellowships from Poets and Writers and Literary Arts, Inc. Her work appears in the anthologies Life As We Show It (City Lights), Forms At War (FC2), Wreckage of Reason (Spuytin Duyvil). Yuknavitch teaches writing, literature, film, and Women's Studies in Oregon.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 9 comments:

schottam, January 30, 2013 (view all comments by schottam)
Dora is absolutely the best and most timely novel of 2012. It is a glimpse into the postmodern bizarre of girlhood: guts, pain, art, and sex beautifully smeared across the page without an inch of timidity. Yuknavitch is a gift.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(2 of 4 readers found this comment helpful)
smz1980, January 30, 2013 (view all comments by smz1980)
The best read of 2012!
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(2 of 4 readers found this comment helpful)
Domi, January 23, 2013 (view all comments by Domi)
Yuknavitch successfully uses farce as a construct to pull off serious cultural criticism by poking fun and using outrageous exaggeration as a device. Her storytelling is deliberate and she is an expert at weaving multiple meanings into her work that teach, inform and transform the reader without knowing they are being transformed until after its all over.
I would seriously suggest this book as a teaching tool in various courses, from Psychology to Philosophy and Women's studies to Literature, just as a start.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(2 of 4 readers found this comment helpful)
View all 9 comments

Product Details

ISBN:
9780983477570
Author:
Yuknavitch, Lidia
Publisher:
Hawthorne Books
Introduction:
Palahniuk, Chuck
Author:
Palahniuk, Chuck
Subject:
Literature-A to Z
Subject:
Literature-Coming of Age
Edition Description:
Trade Paper
Publication Date:
20120831
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Language:
English
Pages:
240
Dimensions:
9 x 5.5 in
Age Level:
Literature-Coming of Age

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Dora: A Headcase Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$11.95 In Stock
Product details 240 pages Hawthorne Books - English 9780983477570 Reviews:
"Staff Pick" by ,

This book jumps off the cliff with the first chapter but never quite crashes at the bottom. The crazy ride stayed with me weeks after reading it, and I still occasionally ask myself what the hell just happened! The author calls it a farce; it's that and a lot more. Thank you, Lidia Yuknavitch, for the meatiest, most-fun, most-challenging-to-my-sense-of-how-far-you-can-push-things book of the year.

"Staff Pick" by ,

Yuknavitch is such a literary badass. In her debut novel (following last year's fantastic memoir, The Chronology of Water), she rips Freud's classic case study to shreds, then stitches it back together as a contemporary radical/feminist/hyperactive/queer coming-of-age story. Hysterical!

"Review" by , "Hold a basketball under water, take your hand away, and it'll surface with the powerhouse force of the suppressed. Welcome to Lidia Yuknavitch's world. In Dora: A Headcase, Yuknavitch reimagines the girl, the woman, at the heart of Sigmund Freud's breakthrough case study and unleashes this character's fury against a backdrop of hypocritical adulthood. Yuknavitch is talking back to a hundred years, to the founding of psychoanalysis. I'd like to think she wrote parts of this novel just for me, but so many readers will feel that way. Yuknavitch has wrestled with the force of her own convictions and given a powerful voice to a badass character born on the literary landscape."
"Review" by , "Dora is too much for Sigmund Freud but shes just right for us — raunchy, sharp and so funny it hurts."
"Review" by , "In these times there's no reason for a novel to exist unless it's dangerous, provocative and not like anything that's come before. Dora: A Headcase is that kind of novel. It's dirty, sexy, rude, smart, soulful, fresh and risky. Think of your favorite out-there genius writer; multiply by ten, add a big heart, a poet's ear, and a bad girl's courage, and you've got Lidia Yuknavitch."
"Review" by , "Dora: A Head Case is first and foremost an irreverent portrait of a smart seventeen year old trying to survive. It channels Sigmund Freud and his young patient Dora and is both a hilarious critique and an oddly touching homage. With an unerring ear and a very keen eye, Lidia Yuknavitch casts a very special slant of light on our centuries and our lives. Put simply, the book is needed."
"Review" by , "Snappy and fun. I can pretty much guarantee you haven't met a character quite l like Ida before."
"Review" by , "In Dora, [Lidia Yuknavitch] takes the most classic model of Thera-tainment, personal-crisis-as-content, and she re-imagines it wonderfully reversed. The world of Dora is not just possible, it's inevitable. It's revenge as the ultimate therapy."
"Review" by , "Dora: A Headcase is a feminist retelling of Freud's famous case study, Dora. But the novel constantly transcends this conceit in beautiful and surprising ways....Put simply, Yuknavitch has written the best portrait of teen girlhood I have ever read. I loved this book — it's like a smart, fast chick Fight Club."
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