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The Marriage Plot

by

The Marriage Plot Cover

ISBN13: 9781250014764
ISBN10: 125001476x
Condition: Standard
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Excerpt

To start with, look at all the books. There were her Edith Wharton novels, arranged not by title but date of publication; there was the complete Modern Library set of Henry James, a gift from her father on her twenty-first birthday; there were the dog-eared paperbacks assigned in her college courses, a lot of Dickens, a smidgen of Trollope, along with good helpings of Austen, George Eliot, and the redoubtable Brontë sisters. There were a whole lot of black-and-white New Directions paperbacks, mostly poetry by people like H.D. or Denise Levertov. There were the Colette novels she read on the sly. There was the first edition of Couples, belonging to her mother, which Madeleine had surreptitiously dipped into back in sixth grade and which she was using now to provide textual support in her English honors thesis on the marriage plot. There was, in short, this mid-size but still portable library representing pretty much everything Madeleine had read in college, a collection of texts, seemingly chosen at random, whose focus slowly narrowed, like a personality test, a sophisticated one you couldnt trick by anticipating the implications of its questions and finally got so lost in that your only recourse was to answer the simple truth. And then you waited for the result, hoping for “Artistic,” or “Passionate,” thinking you could live with “Sensitive,” secretly fearing “Narcissistic” and “Domestic,” but finally being presented with an outcome that cut both ways and made you feel different depending on the day, the hour, or the guy you happened to be dating: “Incurably Romantic.”

These were the books in the room where Madeleine lay, with a pillow over her head, on the morning of her college graduation. Shed read each and every one, often multiple times, frequently underlining passages, but that was no help to her now. Madeleine was trying to ignore the room and everything in it. She was hoping to drift back down into the oblivion where shed been safely couched for the last three hours. Any higher level of wakefulness would force her to come to grips with certain disagreeable facts: for instance, the amount and variety of the alcohol shed imbibed last night, and the fact that shed gone to sleep with her contacts in. Thinking about such specifics would, in turn, call to mind the reasons shed drunk so much in the first place, which she definitely didnt want to do. And so Madeleine adjusted her pillow, blocking out the early morning light, and tried to fall back to sleep.

But it was useless. Because right then, at the other end of her apartment, the doorbell began to ring.

Early June, Providence, Rhode Island, the sun up for almost two hours already, lighting up the pale bay and the smokestacks of the Narragansett Electric factory, rising like the sun on the Brown University seal emblazoned on all the pennants and banners draped up over campus, a sun with a sagacious face, representing knowledge. But this sun—the one over Providence— was doing the metaphorical sun one better, because the founders of the university, in their Baptist pessimism, had chosen to depict the light of knowledge enshrouded by clouds, indicating that ignorance had not yet been dispelled from the human realm, whereas the actual sun was just now fighting its way through cloud cover, sending down splintered beams of light and giving hope to the squadrons of parents, whod been soaked and frozen all weekend, that the unseasonable weather might not ruin the days festivities. All over College Hill, in the geometric gardens of the Georgian mansions, the magnolia-scented front yards of Victorians, along brick sidewalks running past black iron fences like those in a Charles Addams cartoon or a Lovecraft story; outside the art studios at the Rhode Island School of Design, where one painting major, having stayed up all night to work, was blaring Patti Smith; shining off the instruments (tuba and trumpet, respectively) of the two members of the Brown marching band who had arrived early at the meeting point and were nervously looking around, wondering where everyone else was; brightening the cobblestone side streets that led downhill to the polluted river, the sun was shining on every brass doorknob, insect wing, and blade of grass. And, in concert with the suddenly flooding light, like a starting gun for all the activity, the doorbell in Madeleines fourth- floor apartment began, clamorously, insistently, to ring.

The pulse reached her less as a sound than as a sensation, an electric shock shooting up her spine. In one motion Madeleine tore the pillow off her head and sat up in bed. She knew who was ringing the buzzer. It was her parents. Shed agreed to meet Alton and Phyllida for breakfast at 7:30. Shed made this plan with them two months ago, in April, and now here they were, at the appointed time, in their eager, dependable way. That Alton and Phyllida had driven up from New Jersey to see her graduate, that what they were here to celebrate today wasnt only her achievement but their own as parents, had nothing wrong or unexpected about it. The problem was that Madeleine, for the first time in her life, wanted no part of it. She wasnt proud of herself. She was in no mood to celebrate. Shed lost faith in the significance of the day and what the day represented.

She considered not answering. But she knew that if she didnt answer, one of her roommates would, and then shed have to explain where shed disappeared to last night, and with whom. Therefore, Madeleine slid out of the bed and reluctantly stood up.

This seemed to go well for a moment, standing up. Her head felt curiously light, as if hollowed out. But then the blood, draining from her skull like sand from an hourglass, hit a bottleneck, and the back of her head exploded in pain.

In the midst of this barrage, like the furious core from which it emanated, the buzzer erupted again. She came out of her bedroom and stumbled in bare feet to the intercom in the hall, slapping the speak button to silence the buzzer.

“Hello?”

“Whats the matter? Didnt you hear the bell?” It was Altons voice, as deep and commanding as ever, despite the fact that it was issuing from a tiny speaker.

“Sorry,” Madeleine said. “I was in the shower.”

“Likely story. Will you let us in, please?”

Madeleine didnt want to. She needed to wash up first.

“Im coming down,” she said.

This time, she held down the SPEAK button too long, cutting off Altons response. She pressed it again and said, “Daddy?” but while she was speaking, Alton must have been speaking, too, because when she pressed LISTEN all that came through was static.

Madeleine took this pause in communications to lean her forehead against the door frame. The wood felt nice and cool. The thought struck her that, if she could keep her face pressed against the soothing wood, she might be able to cure her headache, and if she could keep her forehead pressed against the door frame for the rest of the day, while somehow still being able to leave the apartment, she might make it through breakfast with her parents, march in the commencement procession, get a diploma, and graduate.

She lifted her face and pressed SPEAK again.

“Daddy?”

But it was Phyllidas voice that answered. “Maddy? Whats the matter?

Let us in.”

“My roommates are still asleep. Im coming down. Dont ring the bell

anymore.”

“We want to see your apartment!”

“Not now. Im coming down. Dont ring.”

She took her hand from the buttons and stood back, glaring at the intercom as if daring it to make a sound. When it didnt, she started back down the hall. She was halfway to the bathroom when her roommate Abby emerged, blocking the way. She yawned, running a hand through her big hair, and then, noticing Madeleine, smiled knowingly.

“So,” Abby said, “where did you sneak off to last night?”

“My parents are here,” Madeleine said. “I have to go to breakfast.”

“Come on. Tell me.”

“Theres nothing to tell. Im late.”

“How come youre wearing the same clothes, then?”

Instead of replying, Madeleine looked down at herself. Ten hours earlier, when shed borrowed the black Betsey Johnson dress from Olivia, Madeleine had thought it looked good on her. But now the dress felt hot and sticky, the fat leather belt looked like an S&M restraint, and there was a stain near the hem that she didnt want to identify.

Abby, meanwhile, had knocked on Olivias door and entered. “So much for Maddys broken heart,” she said. “Wake up! Youve got to see this.”

The path to the bathroom was clear. Madeleines need for a shower was extreme, almost medical. At a minimum, she had to brush her teeth. But Olivias voice was audible now. Soon Madeleine would have two roommates interrogating her. Her parents were liable to start ringing again any minute. As quietly as possible, she inched back down the hall. She stepped into a pair of loafers left by the front door, crushing the heels flat as she caught her balance, and escaped into the outer corridor.

The elevator was waiting at the end of the floral runner. Waiting, Madeleine realized, because shed failed to close the sliding gate when shed staggered out of the thing a few hours earlier. Now she shut the gate securely and pressed the button for the lobby, and with a jolt the antique contraption began to descend through the buildings interior gloom.

Madeleines building, a Neo-Romanesque castle called the Narragansett that wrapped around the plunging corner of Benefit Street and Church Street, had been built at the turn of the century. Among its surviving period details—the stained-glass skylight, the brass wall sconces, the marble lobby—was the elevator. Made of curving metal bars like a giant birdcage, the elevator miraculously still functioned, but it moved slowly, and as the car dropped, Madeleine took the opportunity to make herself more presentable. She ran her hands through her hair, fingercombing

it. She polished her front teeth with her index finger. She rubbed mascara crumbs from her eyes and moistened her lips with her tongue. Finally, passing the balustrade on the second floor, she checked her reflection in the small mirror attached to the rear panel.

One of the nice things about being twenty-two, or about being Madeleine Hanna, was that three weeks of romantic anguish, followed by a night of epic drinking, didnt do much visible damage. Except for puffiness around her eyes, Madeleine looked like the same pretty, dark-haired person as usual. The symmetries of her face—the straight nose, the Katharine Hepburn-ish cheekbones and jawline—were almost mathematical in their precision. Only the slight furrow in her brow gave evidence of the slightly anxious person that Madeleine felt herself, intrinsically, to be.

She could see her parents waiting below. They were trapped between the lobby door and the door to the street, Alton in a seersucker jacket, Phyllida in a navy suit and matching gold- buckled purse. For a second, Madeleine had an impulse to stop the elevator and leave her parents stuck in the foyer amid all the college-town clutter—the posters for New Wave bands with names like Wretched Misery or the Clits, the pornographic Egon Schiele drawings by the RISD kid on the second floor, all the clamorous Xeroxes whose subtext conveyed the message that the

wholesome, patriotic values of her parents generation were now on the ash heap of history, replaced by a nihilistic, post-punk sensibility that Madeleine herself didnt understand but was perfectly happy to scandalize her parents by pretending that she did—before the elevator stopped in the lobby and she slid open the gate and stepped out to meet them.

Alton was first through the door. “Here she is!” he said avidly. “The college graduate!” In his net-charging way, he surged forward to seize her in a hug. Madeleine stiffened, worried that she smelled of alcohol or, worse, of sex.

“I dont know why you wouldnt let us see your apartment,” Phyllida said, coming up next. “I was looking forward to meeting Abby and Olivia. Wed love to treat them to dinner later.”

“Were not staying for dinner,” Alton reminded her.

“Well, we might. That depends on Maddys schedule.”

“No, thats not the plan. The plan is to see Maddy for breakfast and

then leave after the ceremony.”

“Your father and his plans,” Phyllida said to Madeleine. “Are you

wearing that dress to the ceremony?”

“I dont know,” Madeleine said.

“I cant get used to these shoulder pads all the young women are

wearing. Theyre so mannish.”

“Its Olivias.”

“You look pretty whacked out, Mad,” Alton said. “Big party last

night?”

“Not really.”

“Dont you have anything of your own to wear?” Phyllida said.

“Ill have my robe on, Mummy,” Madeleine said, and, to forestall further inspection, headed past them through the foyer. Outside, the sun had lost its battle with the clouds and vanished. The weather looked not much better than it had all weekend. Campus Dance, on Friday night, had been more or less rained out. The Baccalaureate service on Sunday had proceeded under a steady drizzle. Now, on Monday, the rain had stopped, but the temperature felt closer to St. Patricks than to Memorial Day.

As she waited for her parents to join her on the sidewalk, it occurred to Madeleine that she hadnt had sex, not really. This was some consolation.

“Your sister sends her regrets,” Phyllida said, coming out. “She has to take Richard the Lionhearted for an ultrasound today.”

Richard the Lionhearted was Madeleines nine-week-old nephew. Everyone else called him Richard.

“Whats the matter with him?” Madeleine asked.

“One of his kidneys is petite, apparently. The doctors want to keep an eye on it. If you ask me, all these ultrasounds do is find things to worry about.”

“Speaking of ultrasounds,” Alton said, “I need to get one on my knee.”

Phyllida paid no attention. “Anyway, Allies devastated not to see you graduate. As is Blake. But theyre hoping you and your new beau might visit them this summer, on your way to the Cape.”

You had to stay alert around Phyllida. Here she was, ostensibly talking about Richard the Lionhearteds petite kidney, and already shed managed to move the subject to Madeleines new boyfriend, Leonard (whom Phyllida and Alton hadnt met), and to Cape Cod (where Madeleine had announced plans to cohabitate with him). On a normal day, when her brain was working, Madeleine would have been able to keep one step ahead of Phyllida, but this morning the best she could manage was to let the words float past her.

Fortunately, Alton changed the subject. “So, where do you recommend for breakfast?”

Madeleine turned and looked vaguely down Benefit Street. “Theres a place this way.”

She started shuffling along the sidewalk. Walking—moving—seemed like a good idea. She led them past a line of quaint, nicely maintained houses bearing historical placards, and a big apartment building with a gable roof. Providence was a corrupt town, crime-ridden and mob-controlled, but up on College Hill this was hard to see. The sketchy downtown and dying or dead textile mills lay below, in the grim distance. Here the narrow streets, many of them cobblestone, climbed past mansions or snaked around Puritan graveyards full of headstones as narrow as heavens door, streets with names like Prospect, Benevolent, Hope, and Meeting, all of them feeding into the arboreous campus at the top. The sheer physical elevation suggested an intellectual one.

“Arent these slate sidewalks lovely,” Phyllida said as she followed along. “We used to have slate sidewalks on our street. Theyre much more attractive. But then the borough replaced them with concrete.”

“Assessed us for the bill, too,” Alton said. He was limping slightly, bringing up the rear. The right leg of his charcoal trousers was swelled from the knee brace he wore on and off the tennis court. Alton had been club champion in his age group for twelve years running, one of those older guys with a sweatband ringing a balding crown, a choppy forehand, and absolute murder in his eyes. Madeleine had been trying to beat Alton her entire life without success. This was even more infuriating because she was better than he was, at this point. But whenever she took a set from Alton he started intimidating her, acting mean, disputing calls, and her game fell apart. Madeleine was worried that there was something paradigmatic in this, that she was destined to go through life being cowed by less capable men. As a result, Madeleines tennis matches against Alton had assumed such outsize personal significance for her that she got tight whenever she played him, with predictable results. And Alton still gloated when he won, still got all rosy and jiggly, as if hed bested her by sheer talent.

At the corner of Benefit and Waterman, they crossed behind the white steeple of First Baptist Church. In preparation for the ceremony, loudspeakers had been set up on the lawn. A man wearing a bow tie, a dean-of-students-looking person, was tensely smoking a cigarette and inspecting a raft of balloons tied to the churchyard fence.

By now Phyllida had caught up to Madeleine, taking her arm to negotiate the uneven slate, which was pushed up by the roots of gnarled plane trees that lined the curb. As a little girl, Madeleine had thought her mother pretty, but that was a long time ago. Phyllidas face had gotten heavier over the years; her cheeks were beginning to sag like those of a camel. The conservative clothes she wore—the clothes of a philanthropist or lady ambassador—had a tendency to conceal her figure. Phyllidas hair was where her power resided. It was expensively set into a smooth dome, like a band shell for the presentation of that long-running act, her face. For as long as Madeleine could remember, Phyllida had never been at a loss for words or shy about a point of etiquette. Among her friends Madeleine liked to make fun of her mothers formality, but she often found herself comparing other peoples manners unfavorably with Phyllidas.

And right now Phyllida was looking at Madeleine with the proper expression for this moment: thrilled by the pomp and ceremony, eager to put intelligent questions to any of Madeleines professors she happened to meet, or to trade pleasantries with fellow parents of graduating seniors. In short, she was available to everyone and everything and in step with the social and academic pageantry, all of which exacerbated Madeleines feeling of being out of step, for this day and the rest of her life.

She plunged on, however, across Waterman Street, and up the steps of Carr House, seeking refuge and coffee.

The café had just opened. The guy behind the counter, who was wearing Elvis Costello glasses, was rinsing out the espresso machine. At a table against the wall, a girl with stiff pink hair was smoking a clove cigarette and reading Invisible Cities. “Tainted Love” played from the stereo on top of the refrigerator.

Phyllida, holding her handbag protectively against her chest, had paused to peruse the student art on the walls: six paintings of small, skindiseased dogs wearing bleach-bottle collars.

“Isnt this fun?” she said tolerantly.

“La Bohème,” Alton said.

Madeleine installed her parents at a table near the bay window, as far away from the pink- haired girl as possible, and went up to the counter. The guy took his time coming over. She ordered three coffees—a large for her—and bagels. While the bagels were being toasted, she brought

the coffees over to her parents.

Alton, who couldnt sit at the breakfast table without reading, had taken a discarded Village Voice from a nearby table and was perusing it. Phyllida was staring overtly at the girl with pink hair.

“Do you think thats comfortable?” she inquired in a low voice.

Madeleine turned to see that the girls ragged black jeans were held together by a few hundred safety pins.

“I dont know, Mummy. Why dont you go ask her?”

“Im afraid of getting poked.”

“According to this article,” Alton said, reading the Voice, “homosexuality didnt exist until the nineteenth century. It was invented. In Germany.”

The coffee was hot, and lifesavingly good. Sipping it, Madeleine began to feel slightly less awful.

After a few minutes, she went up to get the bagels. They were a little burned, but she didnt want to wait for new ones, and so brought them back to the table. After examining his with a sour expression, Alton began scraping it punitively with a plastic knife.

Phyllida asked, “So, are we going to meet Leonard today?”

“Im not sure,” Madeleine said.

“Anything you want us to know about?”

“No.”

“Are you two still planning to live together this summer?”

By this time Madeleine had taken a bite of her bagel. And since the answer to her mothers question was complicated—strictly speaking, Madeleine and Leonard werent planning on living together, because theyd broken up three weeks ago; despite this fact, however, Madeleine hadnt given up hope of a reconciliation, and seeing as shed spent so much effort getting her parents used to the idea of her living with a guy, and didnt want to jeopardize that by admitting that the plan was off—she was relieved to be able to point at her full mouth, which prevented her from replying.

“Well, youre an adult now,” Phyllida said. “You can do what you like. Though, for the record, I have to say that I dont approve.”

“Youve already gone on record about that,” Alton broke in.

“Because its still a bad idea!” Phyllida cried. “I dont mean the propriety of it. Im talking about the practical problems. If you move in with Leonard—or any young man—and hes the one with the job, then you begin at a disadvantage. What happens if you two dont get along? Where are you then? You wont have any place to live. Or anything to do.”

That her mother was correct in her analysis, that the predicament Phyllida warned Madeleine about was exactly the predicament she was already in, didnt motivate Madeleine to register agreement.

“You quit your job when you met me,” Alton said to Phyllida.

“Thats why I know what Im talking about.”

“Can we change the subject?” Madeleine said at last, having swallowed her food.

“Of course we can, sweetheart. Thats the last Ill say about it. If your plans change, you can always come home. Your father and I would love to have you.”

“Not me,” Alton said. “I dont want her. Moving back home is always a bad idea. Stay away.”

“Dont worry,” Madeleine said. “I will.”

“The choice is yours,” Phyllida said. “But if you do come home, you could have the loft. That way you can come and go as you like.”

To her surprise, Madeleine found herself contemplating this proposal. Why not tell her parents everything, curl up in the backseat of the car, and let them take her home? She could move into her old bedroom, with the sleigh bed and the Madeline wallpaper. She could become a spinster, like Emily Dickinson, writing poems full of dashes and brilliance, and never gaining weight.

Phyllida brought her out of this reverie.

“Maddy?” she said. “Isnt that your friend Mitchell?”

Madeleine wheeled in her seat. “Where?”

“I think thats Mitchell. Across the street.”

In the churchyard, sitting Indian- style in the freshly mown grass, Madeleines “friend” Mitchell Grammaticus was indeed there. His lips were moving, as if he was talking to himself.

“Why dont you invite him to join us?” Phyllida said.

“Now?”

“Why not? Id love to see Mitchell.”

“Hes probably waiting for his parents,” Madeleine said.

Phyllida waved, despite the fact that Mitchell was too far away to notice.

“Whats he doing sitting on the ground?” Alton asked.

The three Hannas stared across the street at Mitchell in his half-lotus.

“Well, if youre not going to ask him, I will,” Phyllida finally said.

“O.K.,” Madeleine said. “Fine. Ill go ask him.”

The day was getting warmer, but not by much. Black clouds were massing in the distance as Madeleine came down the steps of Carr House and crossed the street into the churchyard. Someone inside the church was testing the loudspeakers, fussily repeating, “Sussex, Essex, and Kent. Sussex, Essex, and Kent.” A banner draped over the church entrance read “Class of 1982.” Beneath the banner, in the grass, was Mitchell. His lips were still moving silently, but when he noticed Madeleine approaching they abruptly stopped.

Madeleine remained a few feet away.

“My parents are here,” she informed him.

“Its graduation,” Mitchell replied evenly. “Everyones parents are here.”

“They want to say hello to you.”

At this Mitchell smiled faintly. “They probably dont realize youre not speaking to me.”

“No, they dont,” Madeleine said. “And, anyway, I am. Now. Speaking to you.”

“Under duress or as a change of policy?”

Madeleine shifted her weight, wrinkling her face unhappily. “Look. Im really hungover. I barely slept last night. My parents have been here about ten minutes and theyre already driving me crazy. So if you could just come over and say hello, that would be great.”

Mitchells large emotional eyes blinked twice. He was wearing a vintage gabardine shirt, dark wool pants, and beat-up wingtips. Madeleine had never seen him in shorts or tennis shoes.

“Im sorry,” he said. “About what happened.”

“Fine,” Madeleine said, looking away. “It doesnt matter.”

“I was just being my usual vile self.”

“So was I.”

They were quiet a moment. Madeleine felt Mitchells eyes on her, and she crossed her arms over her chest.

What had happened was this: one night the previous December, in a state of anxiety about her romantic life, Madeleine had run into Mitchell on campus and brought him back to her apartment. Shed needed male attention and had flirted with him, without entirely admitting it to herself. In her bedroom, Mitchell had picked up a jar of deep-heating gel on her desk, asking what it was for. Madeleine had explained that people who were athletic sometimes got sore muscles. She understood that Mitchell might not have experienced this phenomenon, seeing as all he did was sit in the library, but he should take her word for it. At that point, Mitchell had come up behind her and wiped a gob of heating gel behind her ear. Madeleine jumped up, shouting at Mitchell, and wiped the gunk off with a T-shirt. Though she was within her rights to be angry, Madeleine also knew (even at the time) that she was using the incident as a pretext for getting Mitchell out of her bedroom and for covering up the fact that shed been flirting with him in the first place. The worst part of the incident was how stricken Mitchell had looked, as if hed

been about to cry. He kept saying he was sorry, he was just joking around, but she ordered him to leave. In the following days, replaying the incident in her mind, Madeleine had felt worse and worse about it. Shed been on the verge of calling Mitchell to apologize when shed received a letter from him, a highly detailed, cogently argued, psychologically astute, quietly hostile four- page letter, in which he called her a “cocktease” and claimed that her behavior that night had been “the erotic equivalent of bread and circus, with just the circus.” The next time theyd run into each other, Madeleine had acted as if she didnt know him, and they hadnt spoken since.

Now, in the churchyard of First Baptist, Mitchell looked up at her and said, “O.K. Lets go say hello to your parents.”

Phyllida was waving as they came up the steps. In the flirtatious voice she reserved for her favorite of Madeleines friends, she called out, “I thought that was you on the ground. You looked like a swami!”

“Congratulations, Mitchell!” Alton said, heartily shaking Mitchells hand. “Big day today. One of the milestones. A new generation takes the reins.”

They invited Mitchell to sit down and asked him if he wanted anything to eat. Madeleine went back to the counter to get more coffee, glad to have Mitchell keeping her parents occupied. As she watched him, in his old mans clothes, engaging Alton and Phyllida in conversation, Madeleine thought to herself, as shed thought many times before, that Mitchell was the kind of smart, sane, parent-pleasing boy she should fall in love with and marry. That she would never fall in love with Mitchell and marry him, precisely because of this eligibility, was yet another indication, in a morning teeming with them, of just how screwed up she was in matters of the heart.

When she returned to the table, no one acknowledged her.

“So, Mitchell,” Phyllida was asking, “what are your plans after graduation?”

“My fathers been asking me the same question,” Mitchell answered. “For some reason he thinks Religious Studies isnt a marketable degree.”

Madeleine smiled for the first time all day. “See? Mitchell doesnt have a job lined up, either.”

“Well, I sort of do,” Mitchell said.

“You do not,” Madeleine challenged him.

“Im serious. I do.” He explained that he and his roommate, Larry Pleshette, had come up with a plan to fight the recession. As liberal-arts degree holders matriculating into the job market at a time when unemployment was at 9.5 percent, they had decided, after much consideration, to leave the country and stay away as long as possible. At the end of the summer, after theyd saved up enough money, they were going to backpack through Europe. After theyd seen everything in Europe there was to see, they were going to fly to India and stay there as long as their money held out. The whole trip would take eight or nine months, maybe as long as a year.

“Youre going to India?” Madeleine said. “Thats not a job.”

“Were going to be research assistants,” Mitchell said. “For Prof. Hughes.”

“Prof. Hughes in the theater department?”

“I saw a program about India recently,” Phyllida said. “It was terribly depressing. The poverty!”

“Thats a plus for me, Mrs. Hanna,” Mitchell said. “I thrive in squalor.”

Phyllida, who couldnt resist this sort of mischief, gave up her solemnity, rippling with amusement. “Then youre going to the right place!”

“Maybe Ill take a trip, too,” Madeleine said in a threatening tone.

No one reacted. Instead Alton asked Mitchell, “What sort of immunizations do you need for India?”

“Cholera and typhus. Gamma globulins optional.”

Phyllida shook her head. “Your mother must be worried sick.”

“When I was in the service,” Alton said, “they shot us up with a million things. Didnt even tell us what the shots were for.”

“I think Ill move to Paris,” Madeleine said in a louder voice. “Instead of getting a job.”

“Mitchell,” Phyllida continued, “with your interest in religious studies, Id think India would be a perfect fit. Theyve got everything. Hindus, Muslims, Sikhs, Zoroastrians, Jains, Buddhists. Its like Baskin and Robbins! Ive always been fascinated by religion. Unlike my doubting-Thomas husband.”

Alton winked. “I doubt that doubting Thomas existed.”

“Do you know Paul Moore, Bishop Moore, at the Cathedral of Saint John the Divine?” Phyllida said, keeping Mitchells attention. “Hes a great friend. You might find it interesting to meet him. Wed be happy to introduce you. When were in the city, I always go to services at the cathedral. Have you ever been there? Oh. Well. How can I describe it? Its simply— well, simply divine!”

Phyllida held a hand to her throat with the plea sure of this bon mot, while Mitchell obligingly, even convincingly, laughed.

“Speaking of religious dignitaries,” Alton cut in, “did I ever tell you about the time we met the Dalai Lama? It was at this fundraiser at the Waldorf. We were in the receiving line. Must have been three hundred people at least. Anyway, when we finally got up to the Dalai Lama, I

asked him, ‘Are you any relation to Dolly Parton? ”

“I was mortified!” Phyllida cried. “Absolutely mortified.”

“Daddy,” Madeleine said, “youre going to be late.”

“What?”

“You should get going if you want to get a good spot.”

Alton looked at his watch. “Weve still got an hour.”

“It gets really crowded,” Madeleine emphasized. “You should go now.”

Alton and Phyllida looked at Mitchell, as if they trusted him to advise them. Under the table, Madeleine kicked him, and he alertly responded, “It does get pretty crowded.”

“Wheres the best place to stand?” Alton asked, again addressing Mitchell.

“By the Van Wickle Gates. At the top of College Street. Thats where well come through.”

Alton stood up from the table. After shaking Mitchells hand, he bent to kiss Madeleine on the cheek. “Well see you later. Miss Baccalaureate, 1982.”

“Congratulations, Mitchell,” Phyllida said. “So nice to see you. And remember, when youre on your Grand Tour, be sure to send your mother loads of letters. Otherwise, shell be frantic.”

To Madeleine, she said, “You might change that dress before the march. It has a visible stain.”

With that, Alton and Phyllida, in their glaring parental actuality, all seersucker and handbag, cuff links and pearls, crossed the beige-and-brick space of Carr House and went out the door.

As though to signal their departure, a new song came on: Joe Jacksons high-pitched voice swooping above a synthesized drumbeat. The guy behind the counter cranked up the volume.

Madeleine laid her head on the table, her hair covering her face.

“Im never drinking again,” she said.

“Famous last words.”

“You have no idea whats been going on with me.”

“How could I? You havent been speaking to me.”

Without lifting her cheek from the table, Madeleine said in a pitiful voice, “Im homeless. Im graduating from college and Im a homeless person.”

“Yeah, sure.”

“I am!” Madeleine insisted. “First I was supposed to move to New York with Abby and Olivia. Then it looked like I was moving to the Cape, though, so I told them to get another roommate. And now Im not moving to the Cape and I have nowhere to go. My mother wants me to move back home but Id rather kill myself.”

“Im moving back home for the summer,” Mitchell said. “To Detroit. At least youre near New York.”

“I havent heard back from grad school yet and its June,” Madeleine continued. “I was supposed to find out over a month ago! I could call the admissions department, but I dont because Im scared to find out that Ive been rejected. As long as I dont know, I still have hope.”

There was a moment before Mitchell spoke again. “You can come to India with me,” he said.

Madeleine opened one eye to see, through a whorl in her hair, that Mitchell wasnt entirely joking.

“Its not even about grad school,” she said. Taking a deep breath, she confessed, “Leonard and I broke up.”

It felt deeply pleasurable to say this, to name her sadness, and so Madeleine was surprised by the coldness of Mitchells reply.

“Why are you telling me this?” he said.

She lifted her head, brushing her hair out of her face. “I dont know. You wanted to know what was the matter.”

“I didnt, actually. I didnt even ask.”

“I thought you might care,” Madeleine said. “Since youre my friend.”

“Right,” Mitchell said, his voice suddenly sarcastic. “Our wonderful friendship! Our ‘friendship isnt a real friendship because it only works on your terms. You set the rules, Madeleine. If you decide you dont want to talk to me for three months, we dont talk. Then you decide you do want to talk to me because you need me to entertain your parents—and now were talking again. Were friends when you want to be friends, and were never more than friends because you dont want to be. And I have to go along with that.”

“Im sorry,” Madeleine said, feeling put-upon and blindsided. “I just dont like you that way.”

“Exactly!” Mitchell cried. “Youre not attracted to me physically. O.K., fine. But who says I was ever attracted to you mentally?”

Madeleine reacted as if shed been slapped. She was outraged, hurt, and defiant all at once.

“Youre such a”—she tried to think of the worst thing to say—“youre such a jerk!” She was hoping to remain imperious, but her chest was stinging, and, to her dismay, she burst into tears.

Mitchell reached out to touch her arm, but Madeleine shook him off. Getting to her feet, trying not to look like someone angrily weeping, she went out the door and down the steps onto Waterman Street. Confronted by the festive churchyard, she turned downhill toward the river. She wanted to get away from campus. Her headache had returned, her temples were throbbing, and as she looked up at the storm clouds massing over downtown like more bad things to come, she asked herself why everyone was being so mean to her.

Copyright © 2011 by Jeffrey Eugenides

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jacquihiggins, January 9, 2013 (view all comments by jacquihiggins)
The smartest and most entertaining book I read in 2012. Although not very plot driven, the character portraits that Eugenides created here stuck with me and had me wanting to re-read the book immediately after I finished it. I have since recommended it to many friends who enjoyed it just as much.
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zb, January 3, 2013 (view all comments by zb)
Well written with diverse character and plot development without tabloid hype or soap opera drama. It was like reading about family and friends where you could identify with aspects of each of the characters while also being taken to new places and ideas. While there was no dramatic ending or an ending that left you hanging, I wanted to the story to continue because I was so absorbed.
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Jacek, January 2, 2013 (view all comments by Jacek)
The best book about the pleasure of reading since Borges short stories.
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Product Details

ISBN:
9781250014764
Subtitle:
A Novel
Author:
Eugenides, Jeffrey
Publisher:
Picador
Subject:
Literary
Subject:
Literature-A to Z
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Publication Date:
20120904
Binding:
Electronic book text in proprietary or open standard format
Language:
English
Pages:
416
Dimensions:
8.25 x 5.5 in 1 lb

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The Marriage Plot Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$10.95 In Stock
Product details 416 pages Picador - English 9781250014764 Reviews:
"Staff Pick" by ,

Addressing the ubiquitous love triangle, The Marriage Plot by Jeffrey Eugenides is a perfectly executed character study of three college students — Leonard, Madeleine, and Mitchell — who variously are a couple, are not a couple, were a couple, were never a couple, or were almost a couple. Ah, young love! However, absolutely nothing Eugenides writes is frivolous or insubstantial. The painful sucker punch delivered in both Middlesex and The Virgin Suicides is absent in The Marriage Plot, but the book doesn't miss it. The Marriage Plot is long on emotion and so accurately reflects our inner self-talk of angst, love, regret, and need that it feels like reading someone's diary (or maybe our own). Taking on subjects as enormous as mental illness, classism, meaningful work, religious faith, higher education, charity, self-knowledge and the nature of relationships, The Marriage Plot asks the question: Is it sometimes better to not get what you want? Eugenides is a masterful writer who doesn't shy away from uncomfortable emotions, and in his hands everyday issues reveal a deep and complex truth. Once again, the very long wait between his books has definitely been worth it.

"Review" by , "Remind[s] us with uncommon understanding what it is to be young and idealistic, in pursuit of true love, and in love with books and ideas."
"Review" by , "Eugenides's ability to reinvent the timeless tale of love and soul-searching is swoon-worthy."
"Review" by , "I gorged myself on The Marriage Plot."
"Review" by , "A masterful storyteller."
"Review" by , "Audacious and moving."
"Review" by , "Extremely ambitious...surprising, and propulsive."
"Review" by , "Deeply humane and elegantly constructed."
"Review" by , "The finale of The Marriage Plot is unexpected, beautiful, and — Dare we hope? — timeless."
"Review" by , "A master of voice."
"Review" by , "Great serious romantic fun."
"Review" by , "Wry, engaging, and beautifully constructed."
"Review" by , "A grand romance in the Austen tradition."
"Review" by , "A remarkable achievement."
"Review" by , "You'll never want The Marriage Plot to end."
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